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By Kathy Hudson
hudmud@aol.com
| March 19, 2012
I was away this weekend in Rehoboth. As usual, I experienced one of the best parts of travel: unexpected pleasures. On Friday I rode down with a woman I've known all but 10 years of my life.  Being with a friend of so many years is like travelling with family.  Nothing needs to be held back. Honesty of opinion is expressed. Differences are known, understood, and generally appreciated. Still, it seems that new ideas and thoughts are always discussed. This and shared experiences are part of what keeps friendship fresh.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
William Maughlin and "Downtown" Kevin Brown want you to have a good time and good food in Station North , a community they love. The duo behind the much-adored Station North Arts Cafe Gallery are following up that success with a second restaurant, Nancy by SNAC (as in Station North Arts Cafe), which opened last fall. Plans for a third Station North spot, a barbecue joint, are already in the works. Nancy is named for Nancy Haragan , the late founder of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance . Given the arts connection, its location - within the Maryland Institute College of Art Graduate Studio Center on North Avenue - is an appropriate one. Nancy by SNAC is open for breakfast, lunch and snacks every weekday but for dinner only on Fridays.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2011
For her last spring break next week, Morgan State University senior Tenisha Duke planned a road trip to Florida with friends, the eight of them packed in two cars. That way, they could split the cost of gas. But when violence broke out half a world away, sending gas prices here soaring, even that strategy wasn't frugal enough for Duke. She will be spending her break at her District of Columbia home instead of the beach. "I'll be home," said Duke, who spends $80 a week on gas to commute to Morgan State's North Baltimore campus.
TRAVEL
April 3, 2014
Six Flags America launches its 2014 season on Saturday, opening weekends in April and May and daily for spring break, April 12-21. The Maryland theme park has a new Mardi Gras section featuring New Orleans-themed rides, parades and other activities. French Quarter Flyers is a new flying ride that opens this spring. A rollercoaster - the Ragin' Cajun - is set to open in the new area on Memorial Day weekend. To celebrate the season opener and the new section, visitors will be feted Louisiana-style with a traditional jazz march, Mardi Gras beads, masks and a visit from Gator King, the park's newest character.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Howard County Public Schools superintendent Sydney Cousin, who is on medical leave battling lymphoma, will not return to work until after spring break in late April, a memo released Wednesday to school system employees said. The county superintendent since 2004, Cousin took an indefinite medical leave in early January. Earlier this month, school officials announced that he was battling lymphoma and would be out at least until March 1. On Wednesday, a memo to employees said that while Cousin looks forward to returning to the school system, his doctors have advised him to wait until after spring break.
TRAVEL
April 3, 2014
Six Flags America launches its 2014 season on Saturday, opening weekends in April and May and daily for spring break, April 12-21. The Maryland theme park has a new Mardi Gras section featuring New Orleans-themed rides, parades and other activities. French Quarter Flyers is a new flying ride that opens this spring. A rollercoaster - the Ragin' Cajun - is set to open in the new area on Memorial Day weekend. To celebrate the season opener and the new section, visitors will be feted Louisiana-style with a traditional jazz march, Mardi Gras beads, masks and a visit from Gator King, the park's newest character.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN AND ABIGAIL TUCKER and DAVID KOHN AND ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTERS | March 9, 2006
An online survey released yesterday by the American Medical Association found that large numbers of college women engage in unhealthy and risky behavior on spring break. More than half of those who went on spring break regretted having gotten sick from drinking; 83 percent had friends who drank most nights while on spring break. And about six in 10 women knew friends who were sexually active with more than one partner. "The whole problem of what happens on spring break is not new," said the study's director, Richard A. Yoast, head of the Office of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Abuse for the AMA. "We wanted to probe more and see what the perspective of women was."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 20, 2008
I see where the Associated Press conducted a confidential survey of 2,253 college students and found some of them feeling a lot of stress because of spring break -- many can't afford to go to the beaches, and some are out of shape and not sufficiently tanned. And then there's the whole business of grades and finding a job and falling in love; some college students reported feeling too frazzled to sleep. Some don't eat, or eat too much. Many feel lonely, depressed or anxious. I'm sure some freak when they can't get decent cell service, too. Life is rough for the 20-somethings of America.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN COLUMNIST | March 21, 2006
Spring break has become more than a rite of passage for college students. It has become a right. Tens of thousands will be heading to warmer climates this month for a week of sun and fun they believe is somehow owed to them after the rigors of a winter hitting the books. For most of these kids, it is their first vacation away from parents or other relatives. And for many it is a vacation out of the country, in a place where the legal drinking age is 18, not 21. One travel industry estimate has 100,000 college kids heading for Mexico.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
After a busy first semester last year at Boston University, Hayley Spivey was eager to head home to Florida for spring break. Yet while the theater arts major enjoyed the sun and fun, she also found herself slightly bored. "It was nice seeing my family and friends," recalled Spivey, 19. "But other than relaxing, I didn't do much else. " This year, however, the sophomore was in Maryland for her school break, taking part in a movement that's swept college campuses nationwide. Known as Alternative Spring Break, the concept, which gained popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, centers around students performing community service during their time off, instead of, say, participating in wild parties or beach escapes.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Saturday's 12-10 loss to No. 11 Syracuse (4-2) dropped No. 2 Johns Hopkins from the ranks of the unbeaten, which leaves only No. 1 Maryland (6-0) and No. 4 Cornell (6-0) as teams with unblemished records. So where do the Blue Jays (5-1) go from here? “We just turn the page and you move on,” coach Dave Pietramala said during his post-game conference after Saturday's outcome. “It's certainly easier to end your week when you win a game. But as I've told the guys, it's not about winning or losing.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Michelle Obama and her daughters will visit China for eight days during the girls' spring break. Although I am a retired teacher and believe that education is of utmost importance, I am a bit curious as to the purpose of this trip. Educational exchange is certainly of some value, but I am concerned about the expense of this particular trip during a time when our country is in dire economic straights and we are trying to extricate ourselves from more defense spending. So who is actually footing the bill for this trip?
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2013
The Roosevelt Park Recreation Center reopened Wednesday after being closed for about a month because of a broke water pipe. "I missed it," said Gabrielle Barnes, 10, a third grader from Hampden Elementary/Middle School. She was one of 14 children who returned to the center for after-school enrichment activities. Usually, that number is about 25, but some families might not have gotten the message yet that the center was reopen, director Joshua Fissel said. The pipe was repaired at a cost of $10,000, said Kia McLeod, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | April 1, 2013
April, in these parts, is irresistibly transformative. Vibrant life and color rise up and relentlessly overwhelm a drab winter's landscape, inspiring notions in the human heart of renewal and redemption. And with it comes another baseball season and all its manifestations of new beginnings and the grand possibilities that await in the lush green days ahead. So it was supposed to be 45 years ago. 1968 had dawned with the stunning reports of the Tet Offensive, a sobering reality that stretched deep into March, concluding with a sitting president declining to seek re-election, and bringing to us a reluctant familiarity with places called Khe Sanh, Hue, Lang Vei and My Lai. Our weariness longed for April's explosion of daffodils, bright green leaves, and baseball.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Frustrated travelers reported long lines at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport on Friday morning, as crowds jammed into terminals on their way out of town as local schools prepared to let out for spring break. The delays followed the closure Friday morning of one of BWI Marshall Airport's best-kept secrets in swift security navigation: the temporary security checkpoint on the airport's lower level - used by savvy travelers to avoid the crush at the upper level security lines for Concourses A and B. The checkpoint was removed to make way for continued construction of a nine-lane checkpoint, though because of its relative obscurity, it's unclear whether its closure impacted lines.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Savannah Bass, 21, who grew up in Ruxton and graduated from Roland Park Country School in 2008, is working to curb binge drinking on college campuses and along the beach during spring break. As one of 13 University of Alabama students in charge of LessThanUThink, she is using a humorous approach to convey the message that excessive drinking can have unintended, even embarrassing consequences. "We found through research that students don't respond to messages that are negative," she said.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson
hudmud@aol.com
| March 19, 2012
I was away this weekend in Rehoboth. As usual, I experienced one of the best parts of travel: unexpected pleasures. On Friday I rode down with a woman I've known all but 10 years of my life.  Being with a friend of so many years is like travelling with family.  Nothing needs to be held back. Honesty of opinion is expressed. Differences are known, understood, and generally appreciated. Still, it seems that new ideas and thoughts are always discussed. This and shared experiences are part of what keeps friendship fresh.
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