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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
Not only is there war in the Persian Gulf, says Assistant City State's Attorney Roni Young, there's one being fought in Baltimore."There's a war going on in our homes today," said Young, director of the Domestic Violence Unit of the city state's 'N attorney's office. The unit was established in 1983 to assist victims of spousal abuse.Last year, the unit handled 4,500 reported cases of domestic violence, basically misdemeanors, in only six of the nine police districts, she said, citing a small staff of five as the reason.
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NEWS
November 11, 2013
The recent article, "Gansler, Brown clash over domestic violence proposals (Oct 29), pointed out to your readers where two candidates stand regarding domestic violence, so how about giving me an opportunity to express my thoughts on this issue? Unfortunately, I have been a victim of domestic violence. I know first hand what it is like when a spouse hits you, spits at you, attempts to scratch your eyes and uses verbal abuse as well. My experiences from this dreadful situation serve to validate the importance of getting out of those horrendous circumstances immediately.
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NEWS
September 22, 2010
Regardless of the circumstances, sending someone convicted of fatally beating his dog to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to serve out his sentence is akin to sending a male, convicted of spousal abuse, to the House of Ruth, to serve out his sentence. What were they thinking? McNair Taylor, Baltimore
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
A White Marsh woman will spend the rest of her life in prison for hiring a hit man to kill her husband — a man she has insisted subjected her to years of abuse. A judge handed down the sentence Monday after jurors rejected Karla Porter's claim of self-defense and convicted her in August of first-degree murder. Prosecutors have disputed the allegations of abuse by William "Ray" Porter, arguing that she concocted them to justify a cold-blooded murder. "The evidence at the trial was very clear.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore County jury on Tuesday rejected a White Marsh woman's claim that the only way to end years of spousal abuse was to hire a hit man to kill her husband. The jury, composed of nine women and three men, convicted Karla Porter of first-degree murder in a case that tested the scope of self-defense arguments. The 51-year-old defendant stood stoically in a dark pant suit with her long red hair tightly braided as the jury foreman read the verdict, which could send her to prison for the rest of her life without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | November 25, 1993
A 30-year-old Rosedale woman was held without bail last night on charges of first-degree murder and arson after police said she doused her sleeping husband with charcoal fluid and set him on fire.Police said Patricia Ann Hawkins told them she was the victim of spousal abuse and wanted to kill her husband before he killed her."I did it," Mrs. Hawkins, the mother of two, allegedly told officers who arrived at her home about 4:35 a.m. yesterday in the 6100 block of Marquette Road.Milton Hawkins, 32, suffered third-degree burns over 60 percent of his body, mostly his face, head and upper torso, said Capt.
NEWS
May 12, 1992
Starting Oct. 1, Marylanders no longer need be shamed by the state's weak protection of women who are driven from their homes by abusive partners. Gov. William Donald Schaefer last week signed into law a bill strengthening Maryland's weak spousal abuse statute -- the worst in the nation at providing safeguards for battered women. But Maryland is still far behind many other states in this regard. And the sexist way in which the General Assembly dealt with the governor's original measure demonstrates that many of its members still have a lot to learn about this problem.
NEWS
April 4, 1997
IT IS DIFFICULT ENOUGH for domestic violence victims to take the first step and file court charges against a spouse or mate in a potentially life-threatening relationship. Once the legal process begins, however, fragile victims often need help getting through the system.This is where Howard County has fallen short.The state's attorney's office has not responded as well as some of its neighbors in helping battered women who enter the courthouse. Victims should not have to go it alone.Police officers and the courts are more sensitive to brutal acts of spousal abuse than they were a decade ago. More public attention to this problem and changes in the system have given victims the strength they need to get help.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Marilyn McCraven and Kate Shatzkin and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | June 29, 1996
Former state Sen. Clarence M. Mitchell III, who spent 16 months in federal prison for influence-peddling, was arrested yesterday and charged with assault after an altercation with his wife in their Northwest Baltimore home, according to police and court documents.Mitchell, whose late father and namesake is the civil rights leader after whom Baltimore's Circuit Court building is named, was arrested on a warrant charging him with spousal abuse of his wife, Joyce.The arrest came after an incident yesterday morning at the couple's home in the 6300 block of Wallis Ave., said Sam Ringgold, a Baltimore police spokesman.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Recently, the Vatican reaffirmed its position that divorced and remarried Catholics are barred from receiving communion. The solution then for a devout Catholic whose marriage ended in spousal abuse, infidelity, or otherwise through no fault on their own is just to live with a new partner without being remarried. But wait, there's a Catch 22: Doesn't that just constitute "living in sin?" The Vatican's position on remarrying makes about as much sense as its hypocritical position on homosexuality.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Recently, the Vatican reaffirmed its position that divorced and remarried Catholics are barred from receiving communion. The solution then for a devout Catholic whose marriage ended in spousal abuse, infidelity, or otherwise through no fault on their own is just to live with a new partner without being remarried. But wait, there's a Catch 22: Doesn't that just constitute "living in sin?" The Vatican's position on remarrying makes about as much sense as its hypocritical position on homosexuality.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
A Baltimore County jury on Tuesday rejected a White Marsh woman's claim that the only way to end years of spousal abuse was to hire a hit man to kill her husband. The jury, composed of nine women and three men, convicted Karla Porter of first-degree murder in a case that tested the scope of self-defense arguments. The 51-year-old defendant stood stoically in a dark pant suit with her long red hair tightly braided as the jury foreman read the verdict, which could send her to prison for the rest of her life without the possibility of parole.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Jurors are expected to begin deliberating Monday whether Karla Porter is guilty of premeditated murder for hiring a man to kill her husband, or of a lesser charge because she was acting in self-defense. Porter, 51, is charged with first-degree murder in the death of her husband of 24 years, William "Ray" Porter. He was shot to death March 1, 2010, at the Towson gas station he owned after prosecutors said his wife offered to pay an Essex man $9,000. The hit man, William Bishop, was previously convicted in the murder and is serving a life sentence.
NEWS
September 22, 2010
Regardless of the circumstances, sending someone convicted of fatally beating his dog to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to serve out his sentence is akin to sending a male, convicted of spousal abuse, to the House of Ruth, to serve out his sentence. What were they thinking? McNair Taylor, Baltimore
NEWS
January 3, 2010
It would have taken courage to reject an award for Vick The Ed Block Courage Awards celebrate Ed Block, "...a pioneer in his profession and a respected humanitarian," per the foundation's mission statement. I respected Ed Block and his work. I deplore child abuse and the abuse of any sentient life. Anyone working with abuse survivors knows that child abuse, and also spousal abuse, is frequently preceded, or accompanied by, animal abuse. Since Michael Vick's actions first became public, the Philadelphia Eagles organization, including players, has done everything possible to "get past" the "problem" and show that Mr. Vick has "redeemed" himself.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
It didn't take long for Glenwood Freeman to become the prime suspect. A maintenance man at a Catonsville apartment building had discovered Freeman's wife, Tina Marie Williams, 33, sprawled on her floral-pattered sheets, apparently bludgeoned to death with a clothes iron. The house had not been ransacked. Williams' credit cards and jewelry were in place. And Freeman had apparently skipped town, Baltimore County police said, leaving behind what appeared to be a hastily packed travel bag and stories of abuse told by Williams' co-workers and family.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | June 29, 1994
A woman and her 9-year-old son were shopping at a grocery store near their home in Woodstock, Ga. The boy, his mother would say later, was "being rotten" and picking on his sister.Anyone who has ever taken kids to a grocery store can sympathize with the mother.What happened next does not seem to be in dispute.The mother yelled at the son.The son yelled back.And then the mother slapped him.She slapped him across the face, one time. Twenty years ago, or maybe even 10, there would have been some whispers and pointed fingers and nothing more.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | February 28, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The House Judiciary Committee spent yesterday afternoon trying to figure out a way to help women who assault or kill their abusive husbands or lovers defend themselves better in court.The committee was considering a bill that would permit expert evidence of "Spousal Abuse Syndrome" to be introduced in trials of people charged with such crimes. It did so before an audience that included three women sent to prison for assaulting or killing husbands or lovers but granted clemency by Gov. William Donald Schaefer just last week.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Lessons learned at last month's National Conference on Domestic Violence in Dallas may prove valuable to victims of spousal abuse in Carroll County, a local prosecutor says.The four-day conference afforded opportunities to discover how other jurisdictions prosecute domestic violence and deal with victims, said Melissa O. Hockensmith, an assistant state's attorney who heads Carroll's domestic violence unit.Hockensmith, who attended the conference with investigator Gary W. Cofflin and domestic violence case coordinator Latisha Mayne, said that spousal abuse among the elderly, for example, must be treated differently than abuse among younger people.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson SO SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
When Vera Case was found slain in her Mount Airy home in January, workers at the Domestic Violence Center of Howard County felt a pang of defeat.They wondered how Case, 31, could become the victim of her husband's brutal and jealous rage after center workers spent two decades educating Howard residents about domestic abuse."
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