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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to consider a plea to revive a congressional plan to save -- at the same time -- the northern spotted owl and the jobs of lumber workers in the Pacific Northwest.In a brief order issued before the justices began their summer recess, the court granted a hearing to the federal government on its anxious plea that a "timber crisis" was looming as a result of a lower federal court ruling.Last September, a federal appeals court ruled that Congress had acted unconstitutionally in 1989 when it enacted the "Northwest Timber Compromise" -- a multifaceted plan to control logging in the habitats of an endangered species, the northern spotted owl.Under the compromise, which was pressed by Pacific Northwest members of Congress, the government was given orders to sell specific amounts of timber from national forests and public lands, to keep the lumber industry in the area going.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - In his 1992 book "Earth in the Balance," Al Gore pledged to "make the rescue of the environment the central organizing principle for civilization," raising hopes among even the fiercest environmentalists that, once elected vice president, he would radically reshape U.S. ecological policy. Instead, the Clinton administration, with Gore cast as environmentalist in chief, has built a record in land, air and water protection that is long on accomplishments and expansive in scope, but riddled with compromises that have left many environmentalists disappointed and some enraged.
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NEWS
By Art Pine and Art Pine,Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration set the stage yesterday for more controversy over protection of the northern spotted owl as a government panel ordered stiff new restrictions on logging in the Northwest and the administration moved promptly to dilute them.After months of deliberation, a panel of top government scientists, convened under the Endangered Species Act, proposed stringent new measures to help restore the spotted owl population, but at a loss of an estimated 32,000 timber jobs in the Northwest region.
NEWS
December 22, 1995
YOU WOULD THINK they'd just saved Flipper and his children judging from the way biologists went all giddy this week after finding 57 brook trout in the Jabez Branch, that piddling little creek that runs near Route 97 in Anne Arundel County. So what, you ask. Why should anyone care about 57 fish too little to make a decent snack even if you ate them all at once? And why is the state spending our money to protect the unimpressive waterway that is their home?Like most disputes over flora and fauna, this one looks like a hullabaloo over nothing to some people.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 4, 1990
A preliminary study has found no genetic variation between a California owl and the northern spotted owl, whose dwindling numbers and steady loss of habitat have put it at the center of a dispute concerning logging in the Pacific Northwest.The results raise the question of whether the two birds are one subspecies of spotted owl rather than two, as scientists have thought.But researchers said they had analyzed only a small portion of the birds' genes so far. Further investigation and the use of more powerful analytical tools might turn up genetic differences, they said.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | September 18, 1992
LONGVIEW, Wash. -- When Tom Wherry, an out-of-work lumberman now tending bar, heard last week that President Bush was coming to the Pacific Northwest, he laughed derisively."
BUSINESS
By Orlando Sentinel | June 25, 1991
Despite a recession that has crippled the housing industry, lumber prices have jumped more than 30 percent in the past six weeks, home builders and industry members have said.The National Association of Home Builders, a trade group based in Washington that represents builders' interests, laid the blame on proposed logging restrictions on millions of acres of forest land in the Pacific northwest and California to protect the habitat of the northern spotted owl.That has sent timber buyers scrambling to buy supplies to protect themselves from possible shortages, said Mark Ellis Tipton, a Raleigh, N.C., home builder and president of the national builders association.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 17, 1991
THE FORESTS are sanctuaries not only of human life but also of the human spirit. And every tree is a compact between generations.So declared President Bush in 1989. Yet Bush has done little more than his indifferent predecessor to stop the devastation of these sanctuaries. Logging in the national forests continues at a furious pace.Two senior Forest Service officials have told Congress they were kicked out of their jobs for resisting orders to increase the timber harvest that they felt were environmentally unsound.
NEWS
April 6, 1993
After taking on the job as logjam-breaker in the explosive battle between environmentalists and loggers in the Pacific Northwest, President Clinton must have considered his meeting with Russian President Boris Yeltsin last weekend as easy as breaking a match-stick. Instead of dealing with a foreign leader whose agenda coincides with his, Mr. Clinton had to begin fashioning a Northwest compromise that he knew in advance would work only if it satisfies none of the voters he so loves to woo.Ever since a federal judge ordered an end in 1991 to logging in a Maryland-sized forest area that is home to the endangered northern spotted owl, Washington, Oregon and northern California have been a battleground.
NEWS
December 22, 1995
YOU WOULD THINK they'd just saved Flipper and his children judging from the way biologists went all giddy this week after finding 57 brook trout in the Jabez Branch, that piddling little creek that runs near Route 97 in Anne Arundel County. So what, you ask. Why should anyone care about 57 fish too little to make a decent snack even if you ate them all at once? And why is the state spending our money to protect the unimpressive waterway that is their home?Like most disputes over flora and fauna, this one looks like a hullabaloo over nothing to some people.
NEWS
By Lloyd George Parry and Lloyd George Parry,Special to The Sun | July 30, 1995
Question: What's the difference between a Christian fundamentalist and a spotted owl?MA Answer: It's a federal crime to kill and roast a spotted owl.For a growing but still microscopic minority of Americans that exchange pretty well sums up the tragedy at Waco in which 76 men, women and children of the Branch Davidian sect suffered fiery deaths at the hands of the U.S. government.Unlike spotted owls, redwood trees, or, for that matter, defense contractors and health care lobbyists, the Davidians were seen as belonging to no protected or politically influential class.
NEWS
July 6, 1993
It all seemed so easy out there on the old campaign trail. Candidate Bill Clinton went to Portland, Ore., last September and effusively declared: "I know you can be both pro-growth and pro-environment" in sorting out a controversy that had shut down logging on federal lands in the Pacific Northwest to safeguard the endangered spotted owl. He got the endorsement of both the Sierra Club and unions representing 125,000 lumber workers, the political equivalent of...
NEWS
April 6, 1993
After taking on the job as logjam-breaker in the explosive battle between environmentalists and loggers in the Pacific Northwest, President Clinton must have considered his meeting with Russian President Boris Yeltsin last weekend as easy as breaking a match-stick. Instead of dealing with a foreign leader whose agenda coincides with his, Mr. Clinton had to begin fashioning a Northwest compromise that he knew in advance would work only if it satisfies none of the voters he so loves to woo.Ever since a federal judge ordered an end in 1991 to logging in a Maryland-sized forest area that is home to the endangered northern spotted owl, Washington, Oregon and northern California have been a battleground.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | April 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's long-promised "timber summit" in the Pacific Northwest today is beginning to look like a giant photo opportunity shoehorned into a six-hour break on his way to the Vancouver summit with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.An avalanche of lumberjacks, environmentalists, industrialists, trade unionists and fishermen -- about 30,000 in all -- is expected to descend on the Portland, Ore., convention center."Anyone [who] uses wood and paper products needs to be outside that door!"
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | September 25, 1992
Charleston, South Carolina -- George Bush was in the Pacific Northwest last week, chasing votes and damning the spotted owl. No one can reasonably object to a candidate's chasing votes, but I wish he would lay off the owl.The president said he would ask for a major amendment to the Endangered Species Act of 1973. This would direct the Interior Department to make balancing decisions on the survival of threatened animals and plants. The department would have to weigh the environmental benefits of protection against the economic benefits of employment.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | September 18, 1992
LONGVIEW, Wash. -- When Tom Wherry, an out-of-work lumberman now tending bar, heard last week that President Bush was coming to the Pacific Northwest, he laughed derisively."
NEWS
July 6, 1993
It all seemed so easy out there on the old campaign trail. Candidate Bill Clinton went to Portland, Ore., last September and effusively declared: "I know you can be both pro-growth and pro-environment" in sorting out a controversy that had shut down logging on federal lands in the Pacific Northwest to safeguard the endangered spotted owl. He got the endorsement of both the Sierra Club and unions representing 125,000 lumber workers, the political equivalent of...
NEWS
By William Safire | May 17, 1991
I LIKE TREES, and respect other people who like trees. Tree people are stalwart.As a certified city boy at the Bronx High School of Science I used to stay home to observe Arbor Day, which some of the superachievers uncharitably thought was a tricky way to curry favor with the botany teacher.As a political partisan, I winced when Ronald Reagan argued that trees were partly responsible for acid rain, and secretly enjoyed it when press wags derided this with a sign tied around a tree reading "Chop me down before I kill again."
NEWS
By Art Pine and Art Pine,Los Angeles Times | May 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration set the stage yesterday for more controversy over protection of the northern spotted owl as a government panel ordered stiff new restrictions on logging in the Northwest and the administration moved promptly to dilute them.After months of deliberation, a panel of top government scientists, convened under the Endangered Species Act, proposed stringent new measures to help restore the spotted owl population, but at a loss of an estimated 32,000 timber jobs in the Northwest region.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 17, 1991
THE FORESTS are sanctuaries not only of human life but also of the human spirit. And every tree is a compact between generations.So declared President Bush in 1989. Yet Bush has done little more than his indifferent predecessor to stop the devastation of these sanctuaries. Logging in the national forests continues at a furious pace.Two senior Forest Service officials have told Congress they were kicked out of their jobs for resisting orders to increase the timber harvest that they felt were environmentally unsound.
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