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NEWS
June 3, 2003
On May 25, 2003 HELEN BELTZ HAID, 85, of Catonsville, MD, at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, VA. She was the beloved wife of the late Robert E. Haid and mother of the late Deborah Haid. She is survived by a daughter Nannette Haid of Spotsylvania, VA and three grandchildren Jessica Hellman of St. Petersburg, Florida, Nicole Hellman of Fresno, California and Casey Pfitzner of Spotsylvania, VA. A Memorial contributions may be made in her name to the American Heart Association.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Midway between Washington and Richmond, this town on the Rappahannock River was fought over and around repeatedly. There are four different battlefields and related historic sites at the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields Memorial National Military Park — all within a radius of just 17 miles. For two days in December 1862, Union troops under Gen. Ambrose Burnside — whose facial hair became known as sideburns — launched a two-pronged attack across the river in a futile attempt to dislodge Confederate forces dug in on high ground.
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NEWS
April 16, 2004
On April 14, 2004 CHARLES FRANKLIN FERGUSON of Spotsylvania, VA beloved husband of the late Josephine Ferguson; loving father of Timothy M. Ferguson and his wife Ann Kirby of Spotsylvania, VA and the late Charles "Chuck" Ferguson; dear brother of Regina Dowling of Germantown, David and his wife Donna Ferguson of Cumberland; dear brother-in-law of Alice and her husband Myron Vargas and Jack O'Neal. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the GARY L. KAUFMAN FUNERAL HOME AT MEADOWRIDGE MEMORIAL PARK, INC., on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. and to attend funeral services in our Vermillion Chapel on Saturday, April 17 at 9:30 a.m. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park.
NEWS
April 16, 2004
On April 14, 2004 CHARLES FRANKLIN FERGUSON of Spotsylvania, VA beloved husband of the late Josephine Ferguson; loving father of Timothy M. Ferguson and his wife Ann Kirby of Spotsylvania, VA and the late Charles "Chuck" Ferguson; dear brother of Regina Dowling of Germantown, David and his wife Donna Ferguson of Cumberland; dear brother-in-law of Alice and her husband Myron Vargas and Jack O'Neal. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the GARY L. KAUFMAN FUNERAL HOME AT MEADOWRIDGE MEMORIAL PARK, INC., on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. and to attend funeral services in our Vermillion Chapel on Saturday, April 17 at 9:30 a.m. Interment Meadowridge Memorial Park.
NEWS
By Cathy Dyson and Cathy Dyson,THE FREE-LANCE STAR | October 20, 2002
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. - Bob Taylor steers his brown Chevy Suburban along a rundown road in rural Spotsylvania County. There's not a lot of traffic in this part of Paytes or asphalt for that matter and Taylor's glad he's got four-wheel drive. "When it's wet, this road can be a bear," he says, bouncing along with the bumps. At the end of the winding driveway is a rickety trailer and a woman who's lived there alone since her husband died last fall. As always, she's glad for the medicine and the company he brings.
FEATURES
By Charley Mitchell and Charley Mitchell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
Few acres in America have endured more brutal, concentrated fighting than the small area in eastern Virginia below the fork of the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers. During two years, four major battles in the Civil War claimed almost 90,000 men there -- 15 percent of all those who died in the conflict. These battlefields make up the 8,000-acre Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, and all four can be seen in a long weekend.The battle of Fredericksburg in December 1862 was the first of these bloody clashes; Chancellorsville came the next spring, the Wilderness and Spotsylvania a year later.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
FAIRFAX, Va. - Fairfax County Police Chief J. Thomas Manger dreaded the buzzing of his pager, fearing the next message would bring news that snipers terrifying the Washington region had finally struck his bustling suburb. One night last month, the alert came - an apparent sniper attack at a Home Depot store in Falls Church - and the veteran police officer raced to the scene. He had supervised several serial rape cases, but nothing had prepared him or his department for this. "We tried to manage the best we could," Manger said.
NEWS
By JEFFREY SCHEUER | May 25, 1992
Craryville, New York -- I can't think about war, veterans or the American past without recalling an obscure Union soldier from the Hudson River town of Poughkeepsie, New York, who died 128 years ago this week in a Washington hospital.His name was Alvah Kirk, and he was 34 years old, a husband and father. He left behind some letters, which I stumbled upon a few years ago at an antique show in a Connecticut meadow. They tell a story tinged with pathos, mystery, tragedy -- and a bottle of brandy.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Midway between Washington and Richmond, this town on the Rappahannock River was fought over and around repeatedly. There are four different battlefields and related historic sites at the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields Memorial National Military Park — all within a radius of just 17 miles. For two days in December 1862, Union troops under Gen. Ambrose Burnside — whose facial hair became known as sideburns — launched a two-pronged attack across the river in a futile attempt to dislodge Confederate forces dug in on high ground.
NEWS
By Paul Ruppel and Paul Ruppel,Special to the Sun | May 20, 1999
Hoping to disengage from the Wilderness without giving the appearance of retreat, Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant began moving south around the Confederate right flank toward Spotsylvania. Lee anticipated Grant's movement and had already started his army on the march toward Spotsylvania. Lee intended to use his cavalry, commanded by Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, to slow the Union advance, and the Union cavalry, which had been used to protect Grant's enormous wagon train, was ordered to clear a path to Spotsylvania.
NEWS
June 3, 2003
On May 25, 2003 HELEN BELTZ HAID, 85, of Catonsville, MD, at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg, VA. She was the beloved wife of the late Robert E. Haid and mother of the late Deborah Haid. She is survived by a daughter Nannette Haid of Spotsylvania, VA and three grandchildren Jessica Hellman of St. Petersburg, Florida, Nicole Hellman of Fresno, California and Casey Pfitzner of Spotsylvania, VA. A Memorial contributions may be made in her name to the American Heart Association.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
FAIRFAX, Va. - Fairfax County Police Chief J. Thomas Manger dreaded the buzzing of his pager, fearing the next message would bring news that snipers terrifying the Washington region had finally struck his bustling suburb. One night last month, the alert came - an apparent sniper attack at a Home Depot store in Falls Church - and the veteran police officer raced to the scene. He had supervised several serial rape cases, but nothing had prepared him or his department for this. "We tried to manage the best we could," Manger said.
NEWS
By Cathy Dyson and Cathy Dyson,THE FREE-LANCE STAR | October 20, 2002
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. - Bob Taylor steers his brown Chevy Suburban along a rundown road in rural Spotsylvania County. There's not a lot of traffic in this part of Paytes or asphalt for that matter and Taylor's glad he's got four-wheel drive. "When it's wet, this road can be a bear," he says, bouncing along with the bumps. At the end of the winding driveway is a rickety trailer and a woman who's lived there alone since her husband died last fall. As always, she's glad for the medicine and the company he brings.
NEWS
May 21, 1999
The Washington Star of last evening says:A messenger got in last night from the army who left Spotsylvania Court House yesterday at twelve o'clock, and came on horseback to Aquia Creek, and thence came up on a gunboat. At twelve o'clock yesterday a heavy fight was going on a Spotsylvania Court House. we held the place at that hour, and Lee gave evidence of being weakened and of falling back. The messenger had an escort of one hundred and fifty cavalry, and guerrillas were frequently encountered on the way, and it is not improbable that many of the escort were captured when returning to the army.
NEWS
By Paul Ruppel and Paul Ruppel,Special to the Sun | May 21, 1999
When President Abraham Lincoln appointed General Ulysses S. Grant overall commander of federal forces in March 9, 1864, he hoped that Grant would be able to coordinate the Union effort and bring the Confederacy to its knees.On May 6, just before Grant engaged Gen. Robert E. Lee at the Battle of the Wilderness, he gave a message for Lincoln to a reporter headed back to Washington: "If you see the president, tell him for me that, whatever happens, there will be no turning back."In 1862, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan stopped just short of Richmond, Va., overestimating the size of the army before him. In 1863, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker sustained major casualties and turned back just beyond the Rapidan River.
NEWS
By Paul Ruppel and Paul Ruppel,Special to the Sun | May 20, 1999
Hoping to disengage from the Wilderness without giving the appearance of retreat, Union Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant began moving south around the Confederate right flank toward Spotsylvania. Lee anticipated Grant's movement and had already started his army on the march toward Spotsylvania. Lee intended to use his cavalry, commanded by Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, to slow the Union advance, and the Union cavalry, which had been used to protect Grant's enormous wagon train, was ordered to clear a path to Spotsylvania.
NEWS
May 21, 1999
The Washington Star of last evening says:A messenger got in last night from the army who left Spotsylvania Court House yesterday at twelve o'clock, and came on horseback to Aquia Creek, and thence came up on a gunboat. At twelve o'clock yesterday a heavy fight was going on a Spotsylvania Court House. we held the place at that hour, and Lee gave evidence of being weakened and of falling back. The messenger had an escort of one hundred and fifty cavalry, and guerrillas were frequently encountered on the way, and it is not improbable that many of the escort were captured when returning to the army.
NEWS
By Paul Ruppel and Paul Ruppel,Special to the Sun | May 21, 1999
When President Abraham Lincoln appointed General Ulysses S. Grant overall commander of federal forces in March 9, 1864, he hoped that Grant would be able to coordinate the Union effort and bring the Confederacy to its knees.On May 6, just before Grant engaged Gen. Robert E. Lee at the Battle of the Wilderness, he gave a message for Lincoln to a reporter headed back to Washington: "If you see the president, tell him for me that, whatever happens, there will be no turning back."In 1862, Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan stopped just short of Richmond, Va., overestimating the size of the army before him. In 1863, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker sustained major casualties and turned back just beyond the Rapidan River.
FEATURES
By Charley Mitchell and Charley Mitchell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 2, 1997
Few acres in America have endured more brutal, concentrated fighting than the small area in eastern Virginia below the fork of the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers. During two years, four major battles in the Civil War claimed almost 90,000 men there -- 15 percent of all those who died in the conflict. These battlefields make up the 8,000-acre Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, and all four can be seen in a long weekend.The battle of Fredericksburg in December 1862 was the first of these bloody clashes; Chancellorsville came the next spring, the Wilderness and Spotsylvania a year later.
NEWS
By JEFFREY SCHEUER | May 25, 1992
Craryville, New York -- I can't think about war, veterans or the American past without recalling an obscure Union soldier from the Hudson River town of Poughkeepsie, New York, who died 128 years ago this week in a Washington hospital.His name was Alvah Kirk, and he was 34 years old, a husband and father. He left behind some letters, which I stumbled upon a few years ago at an antique show in a Connecticut meadow. They tell a story tinged with pathos, mystery, tragedy -- and a bottle of brandy.
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