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By Jane Applegate and Jane Applegate,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 12, 1991
HONOLULU -- Dave Rochlen's passion for zany fabrics and comfortable clothes has kept his company going for nearly 30 years.Rochlen's thriving surf and sportswear company was inspired in part by his love for Life magazine."
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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | May 21, 2009
Many athletes train by the old concept of "no pain, no gain," and now sports apparel company Under Armour thinks it has a way to make that pain go away a little faster. The Baltimore company is introducing a first of its kind, two-piece body suit this summer that it says will help athletes and exercise enthusiasts recover more quickly from the aches and pains caused by tiny tears in the muscles that follow a strenuous workout. The fitted, long-sleeved suit, which covers the body from chest to foot, is to be worn for 24 hours after a workout and pushes excess water from the muscles and into the bloodstream to reduce swelling and help the micro tears heal more quickly.
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NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
HEAD Sportswear, the ski, tennis and golf equipment and apparel company, is re-opening its discount outlet at its Columbia headquarters, but purchases will be limited to Howard County residents.HEAD will require customers to prove their county residency with a driver's license or other documentation -- a sharp difference from most warehouse or discount outlets which seek to draw customers from a regional market.Company executives decided to limit sales to Howard residents as part of an effort to become widely identified as a Howard County-based company and to avoid direct competition with its retailers in the Baltimore-Washington area.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | December 11, 2007
Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. is planning to add 350 employees at a site in walking distance of its waterfront headquarters, significantly increasing its city work force at a time when it is aggressively expanding into new markets. The sports apparel company expects to open offices in a building now used as a warehouse and freight terminal in Locust Point. Baltimore developer Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse has a contract to purchase the 7.2-acre property, between Beason Street and Key Highway, and wants to do a $14.2 million renovation if it can get zoning approval.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2001
The National Football League filed a federal lawsuit yesterday against two area businesses, alleging they sold unlicensed Super Bowl merchandise. League officials said the suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, is the first of what they expect will be a series of actions against local distributors and manufacturers of unlicensed merchandise. Brian McCarthy, an NFL spokesman, said the league has dispatched teams of investigators to Baltimore to search for counterfeit Baltimore Ravens merchandise such as T-shirts and hats.
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1998
I. C. Isaacs & Co. Inc., a sportswear designer and manufacturer based in Baltimore, reported yesterday a second-quarter loss of $3.1 million, or 37 cents per share.During the comparable period last year, Isaacs posted net income of $3.4 million, or 85 cents per share.Net sales were $26.8 million for the second quarter of 1998, which ended June 30, down 30 percent from $38.4 million a year ago.The company, which offers sportswear for men and women under the BOSS, Beverly Hills Polo Club and Girbaud brand names, attributed the drop in business to growing competition in the young men's jeans market and a late release of the BOSS and Beverly Hills Polo Club fall lines.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
I. C. Isaacs & Co. Inc., a Baltimore- and New York-based sportswear maker, reported a hefty jump in first-quarter earnings yesterday, despite a slight dip in sales. The company also alerted its stockholders that its shares could be delisted from the Nasdaq stock market. I. C. Isaacs sells full lines of sportswear for men, women and boys in the United States, Europe and Puerto Rico under the licensed brand names of Beverly Hills Polo Club, Urban Expedition and Marithe and Francois Girbaud.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
I. C. Isaacs & Co. yesterday reported substantially reduced sales and earnings for its fiscal first quarter, and said it had signed a three-year licensing agreement that should mean more business for the Baltimore-based maker of sportswear for men and women.The firm said it earned $700,000, or 9 cents per share, during the three months ended March 31, a 73 percent decline from the $2.6 million, or 53 cents per share, reported a year earlier. Analysts had forecast earnings of 10 cents a share for the recent quarter.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
An investment company owned by two French designers has drastically increased its stake in I.C. Isaacs & Co. Inc. and is now its biggest shareholder, the Baltimore and New York-based sportswear designer and marketer said yesterday. Eugene C. Wielepski, chief financial officer of I.C. Isaacs, said that the investment company owned by designers Marithe and Francois Girbaud increased its position in the publicly traded firm from 5 percent to 40 percent. News of the deal boosted I.C. Isaacs' shares in the over-the-counter market, where they closed yesterday at a 52-week high of $1.18, up 43 cents.
NEWS
May 22, 1995
POLICE LOG* Elkridge: 7300 Washington Blvd.: Officers responding to an alarm at Imprinted Sportswear found its front glass door shattered with a rock Friday morning, but police said there was no entry.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2006
Under Armour Inc. said yesterday that it had raised the number of shares its founder and other early investors plan to cash in and set the price of those shares at $34. The Baltimore athletic-wear company first announced May 10 that investors planned to sell 6.8 million shares with more than 1 million additional shares available if the deal's underwriters need to cover over-allotments. Yesterday, it raised the number to 7.3 million shares of its Class A common stock. The deal is the first major stock sale since the company became a public entity last year.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | April 27, 2006
Shares of Under Armour Inc. rose more than 13 percent yesterday as the Baltimore sports apparel company reported that first-quarter profit tripled and also raised its earnings forecast for the year. Under Armour said net income increased 248 percent to $8.7 million, or 18 cents a share, for the quarter that ended March 31, compared with $2.5 million, or 5 cents a share in last year's first quarter. Net revenue increased 50.7 percent to $87.7 million, compared with $58.2 million during the corresponding period last year.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
If the Ehrlich administration gets its way, Marylanders will be able to heal the Chesapeake Bay by buying bay-themed spring water and sportswear and by telling cashiers at their favorite shops to keep the change. Details of the governor's proposal to raise millions of private dollars for a Chesapeake Bay Recovery Fund emerged yesterday in the plan's first airing before state lawmakers. Natural Resources Secretary C. Ronald Franks said that the goal was to raise $24 million by 2010 for large-scale projects such as rebuilding oyster populations and planting grasses that boost oxygen for marine life.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2003
Fila Holding SpA, the Italian maker of athletic footwear and apparel, sold all its subsidiaries yesterday, including Sparks-based Fila USA Inc., to a Fila management team for $351 million in cash. The new owner is Sport Brands International LLC, whose partners include Fila USA's current chief executive, Jon Epstein, and its chief operating officer, Tom O'Riordan. In addition to Fila USA, the purchased companies are Fila Sport SpA, Fila Nederland BV, Ciesse Piumini SRL and Enyce. Sport Brands International, a newly formed affiliate of Cerberus, a private U.S. investment fund manager, will operate from the current Fila USA headquarters in Sparks and from offices in New York.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
The story of Kevin Plank and his company, Under Armour Performance Apparel, has so far been a feel-good tale: The former University of Maryland fullback comes up with a new kind of athletic clothing that sweeps the nation and lands him contracts with everyone from the National Hockey League to the United States Ski Team and makes his product a must-have among the Little League set. But now comes the part in the story where the battle really begins....
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2002
Strong sales of Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc.'s sportswear line and increased production overseas have led the Hampstead-based men's apparel company to add two top management positions. Thomas Teves, who previously managed $285 million in retail sales and 61 stores for North Carolina-based Belk Department Stores, was hired for the new position of vice president and general merchandise manager of sportswear and furnishings. Frank Barbarino was promoted to the new position of divisional vice president of worldwide sourcing, Bank said.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | June 16, 1991
That classic summer favorite -- all-white dressing -- gets a new twist this season with texture. Crisp white pique, damask and lace fabrics are turning up not only in the avant-garde collections of fancy French designers, but also in the more affordably priced American sportswear lines. Watch for oversized tops over lacy leggings.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2002
Bill Blass, the American designer who built a multimillion-dollar business on understated clothes and a keen perception of the taste of upper-income American woman, died last night at his home in New Preston, Conn. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his friend Helen O'Hagan. Mr. Blass was the first to say he was the kind of designer who was rediscovered every few years, but although his star burned more brightly in some seasons than in others, he remained in the forefront of fashion for more than three decades.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2002
An investment company owned by two French designers has drastically increased its stake in I.C. Isaacs & Co. Inc. and is now its biggest shareholder, the Baltimore and New York-based sportswear designer and marketer said yesterday. Eugene C. Wielepski, chief financial officer of I.C. Isaacs, said that the investment company owned by designers Marithe and Francois Girbaud increased its position in the publicly traded firm from 5 percent to 40 percent. News of the deal boosted I.C. Isaacs' shares in the over-the-counter market, where they closed yesterday at a 52-week high of $1.18, up 43 cents.
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