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NEWS
June 29, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay and the rich habitat it contains provide outstanding sporting opportunities for the region's millions of hunters, anglers and birders. As a Maryland resident sportsman, conservationist and professional wildlife biologist, I support the Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act, which is currently before Congress. The legislation would improve water quality and wildlife habitat in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and ensure that generations of sportsmen and other outdoors enthusiasts will continue to enjoy the region's wildlife-oriented traditions.
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NEWS
August 22, 2011
The Baltimore Sun has seriously erred in canceling Candus Thomson 's "Outdoors Girl" column ("Headed off down a different trail after many memorable adventures," Aug. 14). I grew up on the Severn River in the '60s. Rising before dawn to fish for perch with my father and siblings is a cherished memory. We stalked the crabgrass for soft crabs and netted doublers off the Naval Academy wall. We vacationed at Herrington Manor in a state cabin and went to Gambrills for picnics. During cold winters, we'd skate to Annapolis.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 7, 2004
RED STATES? Blue states? How about camo? Mainstream media latched onto the "sportsmen's vote" for a nanosecond this fall. But the urban warriors quickly dashed any illusion of a serious discussion by getting lost in the superficial underbrush: Was Kerry wearing the right clothes for hunting? Were they borrowed clothes? Do hunters crawl on their bellies to stalk deer? Who's the better shot, Bush or Kerry? Ugh. Luckily, big-city political reporters have the attention span of the average house cat, so no actual harm was done in their drive-by journalism.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 19, 2010
Robert Edmund Haynes, who owned a popular Gwynn Oak jazz and sports club and was a former Maryland State Lottery commissioner, died Nov. 12 of stroke complications at the Veterans Hospital in downtown Baltimore. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 81. Born in Clarksburg, W.Va., he was the son of the Rev. Egbert Adolphus Haynes, a Methodist pastor, and Margret Delena Jackson, a teacher and homemaker. He moved to Baltimore in 1947 after graduating from Armstrong High School in Washington, D.C. He earned a degree at Morgan State University and belonged to the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
The Carroll County Sportsmen's Association has endorsed incumbents in five local races, but will not make recommendations in the county commissioner race.Association members are unhappy that the current board of commissioners has not pushed to build a county shooting range and preserve farmland, past president Steve Scherer said yesterday."There's just been no results in four years," he said. "Our endorsements are based on past performance." The group endorsed candidates "who reflect our conservative views," association President C. D. "Hap" Baker Jr. said.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
Clarification An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun about Democratic candidates courting sportsmen quoted Rich Novotny, executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association, at a rally for gubernatorial candidate Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. Novotny and MSSA president Bruno Vasta were at the Cecil County event as individuals, not in their official capacity. The association does not endorse candidates for governor, as was explained in another article this week.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 4, 2001
HAGERSTOWN - Except when they squeeze off a shot at game, Maryland hunters tend to be a pretty quiet bunch. They don't rally or boycott. They rarely engage in letters-to-the-editor campaigns or hand out literature at polling places. That could change next Sunday at the North American Rod and Gun Club. Hunters from the western and eastern ends of the state are converging here to decide how to take on Gov. Parris N. Glendening over his anti-hunting stance. The most controversial proposal would have Maryland hunters taking their business to neighboring states.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 19, 2010
Robert Edmund Haynes, who owned a popular Gwynn Oak jazz and sports club and was a former Maryland State Lottery commissioner, died Nov. 12 of stroke complications at the Veterans Hospital in downtown Baltimore. The Northwest Baltimore resident was 81. Born in Clarksburg, W.Va., he was the son of the Rev. Egbert Adolphus Haynes, a Methodist pastor, and Margret Delena Jackson, a teacher and homemaker. He moved to Baltimore in 1947 after graduating from Armstrong High School in Washington, D.C. He earned a degree at Morgan State University and belonged to the Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 14, 2002
You don't have to know a lot about birds to enjoy watching them and listening to their singing. Sometimes the recipe for a perfect day starts with a cup of coffee and a seat on the back porch - a private skybox to watch the finches and chickadees at the feeders and bird bath. For a change of pace from suburban birds, the lower Eastern Shore is just the ticket for watching herons and osprey, warblers and raptors, and more waterfowl than a Daffy Duck film festival. The folks down there know they have a good thing and share it every year during the Delmarva Birding Weekend, which comes up at the end of the month.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | November 17, 2002
Psst, psst, Mr. Ehrlich. Over here in the Mossy Oak Gore-Tex media blind with Polarfleece seats. So, what's new? Just kidding. You've got a lot on your plate, for sure. There's a big helping of IOUs left by Glendening, plus phone calls from long-lost pals who need jobs and getting the governor's mansion off the PETA mailing list. One of those divided camp plates won't be enough, buddy. But when you get around to second helpings, it's important that you don't forget the outdoors community.
NEWS
June 29, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay and the rich habitat it contains provide outstanding sporting opportunities for the region's millions of hunters, anglers and birders. As a Maryland resident sportsman, conservationist and professional wildlife biologist, I support the Chesapeake Clean Water and Ecosystem Restoration Act, which is currently before Congress. The legislation would improve water quality and wildlife habitat in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and ensure that generations of sportsmen and other outdoors enthusiasts will continue to enjoy the region's wildlife-oriented traditions.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 3, 2008
Even though Michael Phelps is taking a break from the pool, he's still picking up honors. The Rodgers Forge native yesterday became the first swimmer named Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year. He's just the third athlete from Maryland to be so honored. Phelps - who appears on the cover of the magazine in a soaking wet tuxedo with his coat draped over his shoulder - is the sixth Olympian selected by the magazine, which has handed out the honor every year since 1954, when runner Roger Bannister won the award.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 15, 2008
By nature, he's a bird trainer. But he's no chicken. Ever since the horse he trains, Kentucky Bear, officially entered the Preakness, Reade Baker has had the same answer to the question he's asked most often: How are you going to beat Big Brown, who hasn't lost a race yet? "He hasn't raced against us yet," Baker deadpans. He repeated the line for a national audience at ESPN Zone late yesterday afternoon, moments after Kentucky Bear got post position 8 at the Preakness draw. As everybody found out later, Kentucky Bear is next to Big Brown at No. 7 on Saturday.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | September 30, 2007
Upon the huntsman's command, the hounds sprinted out ahead, followed closely by riders galloping across a farm field on a clear, crisp morning. The entourage - about 40 crossbred hounds leading 25 horsemen - raced over rolling hills spread across four farms in Harford and Baltimore counties, a spectacle of action focused on the pursuit of a single, diminutive yet tricky creature: a fox. For more than two hours, the pack weaved through a series of cornfields,...
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 26, 2006
Growing up in the wilds of northern New Jersey four decades ago, I wanted to be the next Curt Gowdy. Not the one who was the voice of so many famous sporting events, including the 1969 Colts-Jets Super Bowl and the Orioles-Mets World Series of the same year. I wanted someday to be the host of ABC's The American Sportsman. Every year, from the time I was little, my father and I would plop ourselves down in front of the TV in the coldest winter months and let Gowdy take us to faraway places to fish and hunt with famous people we could never hope to meet.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 29, 2004
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED can certainly make a case for choosing the world champion Boston Red Sox as the magazine's 2004 Sportsmen of the Year, but the main headline on the SI Web site trumpeting the announcement yesterday left me scratching my strikingly handsome noggin. "Who Else?" That's quite an interesting question in a year in which cancer-survivor Lance Armstrong won yet another Tour de France, New England football hero Tom Brady won his second Super Bowl and Baltimore's own Michael Phelps delivered one of the greatest individual Olympic performances in history.
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