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NEWS
By Neil Lippy and Neil Lippy,Contributing sports writer | February 19, 1992
Sports medicine and related fields have found a niche in the health care community.Carroll residents have a better opportunity to learn more about the field at two upcoming meetings.Western Maryland College is the site of the 14th annual Mid-Atlantic Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine symposium Thursday and Friday."I think we have a good program lined up," said Samuel Case, professor of physical education at WMC. "We havesome of the best people in the country, if not in the world coming here.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Mervo senior Tyreke Rudolph has been a big part of the Mustangs' quick start on the gridiron this fall. The 5-foot-9, 165-pound tailback has run for 316 yards on 28 carries and scored four touchdowns to lead the Mustangs to wins over Patterson (27-0) and Dunbar (14-8). He also has nine tackles at cornerback. A three-sport standout, Rudolph has won two Baltimore City wrestling championships at 152 pounds and was a Class 4A-3A North region finalist last season. He is also city champ in the 300-meter hurdles and finished second in the regional meet.
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NEWS
By Peg Adamarczk and Peg Adamarczk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2001
AN EERILY QUIET Oriole Park at Camden Yards was transformed into an impromptu classroom this week when a group of Northeast High School students were allowed a peek at the Baltimore Orioles' inner sanctum of athletic training. The 23 teen-agers, with teacher Marianne Schultz and chaperones in tow, went to the stadium Tuesday to blend fun with a dose of serious study about health careers. The students are enrolled in "Introduction to Health Professions," a prerequisite for the Health Academy program being offered on a trial basis this semester at five county high schools - Annapolis, Arundel, Broadneck, Glen Burnie and Northeast.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
The professional organization for NFL athletic trainers has endorsed USA Football's Heads Up Football program, which teaches kids safe tackling technique. The Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society on Thursday announced its plan to partner with USA Football in an effort to prevent concussions in youth football. "Athlete safety is advanced through education, and that is the heart of USA Football's Heads Up Football program,” society President John Norwig said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | September 15, 2006
In the ever-competitive business of health care, Union Memorial Hospital has taken a shot at a marketing coup with legendary golfer Arnold Palmer lending his name to the hospital's sports medicine program. Palmer took a break yesterday from the Constellation Energy Classic at Hayfields Country Club in Hunt Valley to announce the establishment of the Arnold Palmer SportsHealth Center at the Baltimore hospital. Union Memorial hopes that Palmer, playing in his first tournament in almost a year and just days after his 77th birthday, will provide an example for other professional athletes and "weekend warriors."
SPORTS
By Dr. Richard Hinton, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Lacrosse is the fastest-growing team sport in America. Its combination of speed, sticks, a ball and physical contact make for a unique set of injury types, mechanisms and priorities. Growing nearly as fast as the game itself are the efforts of a group of health care professionals and lacrosse experts working in the area of lacrosse-specific sports medicine. This includes not only developing best treatments for lacrosse-related injuries but also the broader areas of preventing injuries, promoting safety and enhancing participation at all levels of play.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2006
My child has been complaining of ankle and foot pain. I talked briefly with a friend who is a physical therapist. Could it be his shoes? It could be your child's shoes. But then, it could be something more serious. Kevin Crowley, a physical therapist and manager of Towson Sports Medicine Center, says any time a child is complaining of reoccurring pain, you should consult your physician. "As physical therapists," Crowley says, "we really can't diagnose patients. We help implement the treatment."
BUSINESS
April 27, 1996
Baltimore's new NFL team has tapped the University of Maryland Medical Center to provide medical care for its players. The center was one of several Baltimore area health care providers that submitted proposals to the Ravens.The medical center has recruited two sports medicine specialists experienced in sports and family medicine, including a doctor who worked with the team for the past five years in Cleveland.Claude T. Moorman III, an orthopedic surgeon with special training in sports medicine, was hired as director of sports medicine by the university's medical system.
NEWS
August 16, 1999
Names in the newsHospice of the Chesapeake'sboard of directors recently installed officers at its annual meeting: Chairwoman, Martha O'Herlihy; vice chairman, Joe Brennan; secretary, M. Pat Farrell; and treasurer, John P. Rhody. O'Herlihy, Farrell and Rhody are longtime board members. Brennan recently retired as senior director for regional procurement at Marriott Corp.Marc F. Brassard,an orthopedic surgeon with an interest in joint replacement and sports medicine, has joined the staff of Anne Arundel Medical Center.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
Flying Colors elects new directors, officersFlying Colors of Success Inc., a Westminster-based nonprofit organization, recently announced its board of directors and officers for 1994:Chairman, David Bollinger of Barnes-Bollinger Insurance Services Inc.; president/chief executive officer, C. Michael Hardesty, executive director; treasurer, William Guldin, manager of licensing and international, London Fog Corp.; and secretary, Leza M. Griffith, lawyer.Directors are: Charles Cull, associate broker, Long & Foster Realtors; John Jarkweic, curator of marine mammals, National Aquarium in Baltimore; Tim McShea, chairman and chief executive officer of McShea & Co. Inc.; Jolene Sullivan, director of the Carroll County Department of Citizen Services; William D. Swaggerty, account executive with MARCOR Environmental Inc.; and Rick Zengel, F. C. S. consumer representative.
SPORTS
Compiled from Inside Lacrosse and Sun staff reports | October 7, 2013
Sonia Seremet , the wife of Air Force men's lacrosse coach Eric Seremet , was killed in a car accident in Colorado on Sunday, multiple outlets reported. The 37-year-old was ejected from the car, driven by her husband, after it swerved off a road and rolled twice. Their two children were in the back seat and were flown to St. Anthony Central Hospital in Denver along with Eric and Sonia. KKTV reported that Eric Seremet was listed in fair condition; there was no word on the condition of their two daughters.
EXPLORE
By Catherine Mallette | August 19, 2013
“Pay no attention to what I'm doing here,” says Mike Stone, in his best “Wizard of Oz” voice. “Just look out the window, and keep pedaling.” I keep pedaling, breaking into a sweat but going nowhere, as my bike is mounted on what's called a trainer in the bike-fitting studio in the back of Princeton Sports in Columbia. And then I do look away from the window and see that “Stoney,” as he's known, has set up some kind of laser on the windowsill and is projecting a red line along my left leg. The line is showing that my knee gravitates to the side as I pedal.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
"Pay no attention to what I'm doing here," says Mike Stone, in his best Wizard of Oz voice. "Just look out the window and keep pedaling. " I keep pedaling, breaking into a sweat but going nowhere, as my bike is mounted on what's called a trainer in the bike-fitting studio in the back of Princeton Sports in Columbia. And then I do look away from the window and see that "Stoney," as he's known, has set up some kind of laser on the windowsill and is projecting a red line along my left leg. The line is showing that my knee gravitates to the side as I pedal.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
Duke men's lacrosse head coach John Danowski announced Thursday that redshirt senior defenseman Casey Carroll will miss the 2013 season after undergoing surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee. The procedure was performed Monday by Dr. Claude T. Moorman III , Duke's director of sports medicine. Carroll returned to the Blue Devils for a fifth year of eligibility after serving five years as an Army Ranger. He previously played for Duke from 2004-07, earning first team All-America honors his senior season.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | September 26, 2012
The Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland has formed a partnership with Towson Orthopaedic Associates and Towson Sports Medicine to provide injury prevention services and education to the girls who play sports in the IAAM. “We try to connect with those organizations that have the same mission and the same journey we're taking and this seemed like a good fit,” said Sue Thompson, executive director of the IAAM. “We're excited about it and I know they're excited about it. It means better opportunities for our girls and it will enhance their athletic experiences.” One of the first products of the partnership will be a “Tips from the Athletic Trainer” feature for the IAAM and the Towson Sports Medicine websites.
SPORTS
August 13, 2012
After 4 games, look out Ron Fritz Baltimore Sun At first, Vikings running back Adrian Peterson will be tentative and not the superior back he once was. But after four games, look out. I would expect him to run wild in the last 12 games, especially when quarterback Christian Ponder proves he can't win a game by throwing the ball. Peterson can return to form as one of the NFL's top running backs, it just won't happen overnight. He can easily gain 1,000 yards in 2012, but much will depend on how good the Vikings are. If they are always coming from behind, Peterson will get fewer chances to run the ball.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
Jewelry sale to aid Partners in Care The fourth annual Valentine's Jewelry Extravaganza will be held Feb. 3 and 4 to benefit Partners In Care, a registered 501(c)3 organization that helps older and disabled adults remain independent in their own homes. Precious, semi-precious, vintage, costume, polymer and beaded jewelry from Partners In Care collections, local artisans and private vendors will be included. The preview show and sale will be held from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Feb. 3 at Corky's Hard Bean Cafe, 562 Ritchie Highway in Park Plaza.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | July 24, 1992
Next time an Oriole ace turns sour, don't ask why his curve ball doesn't break or why his fastball has lost its pop. Instead, furrow your brow and wonder whether he's lost an inch off his stride, or if his elbow-to-body angle has dropped a few degrees.Welcome to biomechanics. Using high-speed video technologyand computer graphics, physicians from Johns Hopkins and Children's hospitals are getting athletic performance down to an exacting science that gives new meaning to the question: "What's gone wrong?"
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 15, 2012
The stories of marathon runners collapsing and dying at the finish line are enough to scare anybody thinking of participating in one of the 26.2 mile races popular around this time of year. But a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers has found the risk of deaths at marathon races is pretty low. Not impossible, but not all that likely either. A runner's risk of dying during or soon after the race is about .75 per 100,000 the research found. Men were twice as likely to die as women.
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