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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
It was no big deal, said University of Maryland football player Devonte Campbell. The tight end remembers catching a short pass in a practice scrimmage last month, lowering his shoulders as he turned downfield, and ramming helmet-to-helmet with an oncoming defender. "I had a nice little headache," the third-year player said with a smile. "It wasn't intentional, you know. Just happens from playing the sport. " It happens a lot. As Maryland and Navy begin their seasons today at M&T Bank Stafium — renewing a 105-year-old rivalry — the public's focus will naturally be drawn to the game's most jarring tackles.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Several U.S. senators have proposed stripping the NFL of its tax-exempt status — a warning analysts say the image-damaged league can't afford to ignore even if the threat proves hollow. Just as it did during Major League Baseball's steroid scandal nearly a decade ago, Congress is using its bully pulpit — and threatening legislation — to prod change on another of the nation's pastimes. Lawmakers introduced bills last week threatening to revoke the league's tax exemption for two different reasons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Last November, 26-year-old Alexis Marianes was in the middle of an intramural soccer game at the Du Burns Arena in Canton when a player on the opposing team swept her feet out from under her. Marianes did a "halfway back-flip" and landed squarely on her head, resulting in a concussion. "I couldn't read or open my eyes for four days," Marianes said. "I'd just lay in bed crying. " As Baltimore's social sports leagues continue to grow, so do the number of injuries associated with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
I joined Christine Brennan, of "USA Today," and Howard Kurtz on "Media Buzz" today to talk about TMZ and the performance of mainstream media in covering -- or not covering -- the Ray Rice story. I was at first surpised to hear Brennan, who knows this turf as well as anyone, say an argument could be made that it is "the biggest controversy to ever hit a U.S. sports league. " But having thought about it since, I think she could be right. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | July 11, 1992
The troubles that killed the Major Soccer League demonstrate the fierce struggle under way for the attention -- and dollars -- of American sports fans.From slo-pitch softball to half-pint basketball, there has rarely been a shortage of sports leagues in this country. And though a few have succeeded, most have not."The highways are littered with the carnage of these leagues," said Alan Friedman, editor of Team Marketing Report, a Chicago-based sports marketing newsletter.Remember the National Box Lacrosse League?
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | May 20, 2005
THE DOCTOR WAS talking about drugs and science meant to help patients fight disease, things such as human growth hormone, erythropoietin, insulin growth factor, testosterone and reprogenetics. "People with wasting diseases, people anemic from chemotherapy, these are people for whom these drugs were invented, to change their lives," anti-doping expert Dr. Gary Wadler said yesterday. "Those are the intended uses. These are also the drugs used by athletes to cheat. These are the perverse uses," he said.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 2002
The WNBA begins its sixth season today with much to celebrate. Start with survival, which has been unusual among women's sports leagues. Its players and teams have improved and become more competitive. The 16-team league seems happy with its television exposure and expects to announce a new television agreement within two weeks. The WNBA has taken over the operation of the Charlotte Sting this season, because the Charlotte Hornets, the NBA team that spawned the Sting, is moving to New Orleans.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
I want to thank Brett Schwartz for the measured and thoughtful response to his mugging at the hands of teenage assailants ("After a mugging, renewed faith in Baltimore," Feb. 29). It takes courage and conviction to keep moving forward and stay positive after such a scary incident. I'd also like to comment on Mr. Schwartz's question about positive outlets available to kids in Baltimore. There are many organizations throughout the city that are fighting the good fight, providing constructive activities and mentors.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
The sale of the Redskins for $800 million yesterday caps off a breathtaking 12 months of new highs for the sale of franchises in all four major-league sports.And with each mega-dollar deal, fans accustomed to pleas of poverty from the home team are left scratching their heads.Critics say the bidding wars for teams reveal an underlying profitability that sports leagues are loath to acknowledge. To do so would endanger the millions of tax dollars that can be won to build new arenas, or weaken the teams in negotiations with players unions.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
With the NFL's tentative labor settlement this week, two of the nation's four major sports leagues have adopted an idea once considered revolutionary: Let athletes change teams nearly will, but tie their salaries to team revenues.Coupling a salary cap with limited free agency was accomplished first by the NBA in 1983, which credits the invention with helping to save the league.If it can work in football, it could spread to other sports and potentially reduce the chronic money disputes that have marked modern sports labor relations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
The NFL has worked on several fronts to draw in female fans: holding special stadium events for women, injecting football themes into shows such as "The Biggest Loser" and expanding lines of merchandise to include not only clothing for women and girls, but household goods such as cheese boards and stemless wine glasses. But after league officials acknowledged fumbling their response to the physical altercation between Ravens running back Ray Rice and his now-wife at a casino in Atlantic City, the outreach effort is coming under closer scrutiny.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 8, 2014
Katrina Marinelli swung for the fences and got all ball. "Nice hit," said a teammate. It wasn't really a hit. The 12-year-old Roland Park girl was hitting a softball off a tee into a net during practice, as the Rams, a newly formed girls softball team at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School, prepared for an April 8 away game against Dumbarton Middle School in Rodgers Forge. Coaches and parents who organized the team say it's the first girls softball team at the school in many years, if not ever, and a rarity in the budget-conscious Baltimore Public School System, where middle school softball is considered a luxury.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Two-time Women's World Cup gold medalist Devon Wills was claimed by the New York Lizards today, making her the first woman to sign with a Major League Lacrosse team, the league announced. "It was an honor to be considered, and I have a lot of respect for all the guys in the supplemental draft," said Wills, who was not selected in last week's event. "Now comes the time for me to compete and take my chance to fight for a spot on the first team. " Wills will have a chance to earn a roster spot at the beginning of April when the Lizards begin training camp.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Now that Major League Soccer has its first openly gay player , the league is launching a new effort to tackle anti-gay attitudes and encourage inclusion in its ranks. Through a partnership with the You Can Play Project, a nonprofit dedicated to fighting LGBT discrimination in sports, the MLS and MLS Players Union hope to build on existing anti-discrimination efforts to offer greater support for gay players and fans. "The diversity found in our League has always been a point of pride for us," MLS commissioner Don Garber said in a statement released today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Last November, 26-year-old Alexis Marianes was in the middle of an intramural soccer game at the Du Burns Arena in Canton when a player on the opposing team swept her feet out from under her. Marianes did a "halfway back-flip" and landed squarely on her head, resulting in a concussion. "I couldn't read or open my eyes for four days," Marianes said. "I'd just lay in bed crying. " As Baltimore's social sports leagues continue to grow, so do the number of injuries associated with them.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray | September 6, 2012
Art Modell forever will be known as the man who took the Browns out of Cleveland, but his legacy as one of the NFL's most influential personalities extends far beyond state lines. As an old-guard owner, he helped pour the foundation for today's game and presided over a host of landmark events. The league's golden era was launched soon after he purchased the Browns franchise for a then-record price of just under $4 million in 1961. Among Modell's cornerstone moments:  ** Because of a television background, he was named chairman of the broadcast committee in only his second year in the league.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 20, 2011
It's London week in the NFL. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who played American football across the pond two seasons ago, return to Wembley to "host" the Chicago Bears. The London experiment is now in its fifth year. The game hasn't sold out -- the NFL can blame the lockout for that -- but it has been well-attended in the past. But can interest be sustained if the NFL placed a team in London, or would it be a novelty act that faded away? John York, co-owner of the San Francisco 49ers and the head of the NFL owners' international committee, told BBC that having a franchise in London “is a long-range plan.” For now, they are trying to market the sport.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Two-time Women's World Cup gold medalist Devon Wills was claimed by the New York Lizards today, making her the first woman to sign with a Major League Lacrosse team, the league announced. "It was an honor to be considered, and I have a lot of respect for all the guys in the supplemental draft," said Wills, who was not selected in last week's event. "Now comes the time for me to compete and take my chance to fight for a spot on the first team. " Wills will have a chance to earn a roster spot at the beginning of April when the Lizards begin training camp.
NEWS
March 7, 2012
I want to thank Brett Schwartz for the measured and thoughtful response to his mugging at the hands of teenage assailants ("After a mugging, renewed faith in Baltimore," Feb. 29). It takes courage and conviction to keep moving forward and stay positive after such a scary incident. I'd also like to comment on Mr. Schwartz's question about positive outlets available to kids in Baltimore. There are many organizations throughout the city that are fighting the good fight, providing constructive activities and mentors.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 20, 2011
It's London week in the NFL. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who played American football across the pond two seasons ago, return to Wembley to "host" the Chicago Bears. The London experiment is now in its fifth year. The game hasn't sold out -- the NFL can blame the lockout for that -- but it has been well-attended in the past. But can interest be sustained if the NFL placed a team in London, or would it be a novelty act that faded away? John York, co-owner of the San Francisco 49ers and the head of the NFL owners' international committee, told BBC that having a franchise in London “is a long-range plan.” For now, they are trying to market the sport.
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