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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2005
LAKE PLACID, N.Y. -- Americans have never really gotten over their love affair with the "Miracle on Ice" game, played 25 years ago today between U.S. amateurs and the Soviet hockey machine. Here, in this village with the snow-globe good looks, parents still bring their children to the rink to pose and play. They visit the Olympic museum one floor below to watch the grainy videotape of that magical win and reconnect with a glorious moment when underdogs triumphed. Lore has it that on the night of the victory, a U.S. warship sent a message to a Soviet vessel nearby that said simply, "4-3," the final score.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | March 28, 2014
It has been exactly 30 years since a covert convoy of Mayflower moving vans spirited the Colts out of town, but all that proves is that time doesn't really heal all wounds. That snowy night in 1984 still lives in sports infamy for the generation of fans who kept the flame and the generation that grew up hearing the sad story of Baltmore's betrayal over and over again at the dinner table. Which is why Ron Piper Sr. showed up this week for a Sports Legends Museum event commemorating Bob Irsay's despicable midnight ride wearing the blue vendor's jacket he wore for 23 seasons selling programs at Memorial Stadium.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 16, 2011
If you watched Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday night, you witnessed the end of one of the greatest wire-to-wire seasons in recent sports history. Tim Thomas, the former journeyman turned unlikely All-Star goalie, capped off his superlative season by leading the Bruins to their first Stanley Cup since 1972. The 37-year-old Michigan native regained his starting job from Tuukka Rask early in the season and put up some very impressive numbers for the Bruins in the regular season.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | August 11, 2013
Major League Baseball's suspension of 13 players in its most recent attempt to address the use of performance-enhancing drugs, including an unprecedented 211-game suspension of its highest-paid player, Alex Rodriguez, is a welcome sign that the game is serious about re-establishing the legitimacy of player accomplishments. The importance of such vigilance cannot be overestimated in a game where statistical comparison serves as a generational bond, and the integrity of those statistics is the adhesive that gives meaning to the experiences shared across time that are the game's narrative.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
In Sports, we have moved our deadlines back a full hour to give readers more late-night scores. Otherwise, you'll find what you've come to expect from The Sun - thorough coverage of professional, college and high school sports, and the best coverage of baseball and the Orioles anywhere.Here's what to look for:* A new front-page scoreboard and index to provide, at a glance, yesterday's results from major league sports, the Top 25 college teams, selected area high schools, and such local teams as the Stallions, Bandits and Spirit.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | January 25, 1992
Eric Crawford readily admits it's not just a ticket to a football game that he's after.Bundled tightly against the cold wind lashing Memorial Stadium last night, the 20-year-old Perry Hall resident said he has never even been to a football game.But there he was at 8 p.m. with about 75 other people who were claiming their places in line -- and, they hope, in local sports history -- waiting for the ticket windows to open this morning.At 9 a.m. today, 32,000 tickets were scheduled to go on sale for the first pro football game in Baltimore in nine years.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | January 27, 2000
ATLANTA -- Another day, another Super Bowl sales pitch, another high-powered Internet merger. Quick, name the reason that John Elway, Michael Jordan and Wayne Gretzky came together yesterday for perhaps the most star-studded news conference in sports history. Hint: It wasn't to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony. Then again, their goal was no more transparent than Coca-Cola's back in the prehistoric days when TV commercials were the preferred way to reach consumers. The Three Entrepreneurs, portraying themselves as the Three Musketeers, want you to visit their Web site -- the appropriately monikered mvp.com.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 7, 1995
In the morning, he took his daughter to her first day of kindergarten.In the evening, he broke an immortal record, hit another home run, kissed his kids and took a victory lap around the field that reduced an entire city to tears.Pretty good day -- only the best in this city's sports history.How can anything compare to the night Cal Ripken passed Lou Gehrig at Camden Yards?How can any other moment compare to an accomplishment, a moment, that shimmered on so many levels?In a city that treasures its past like few others, a city that revels in its sports history, this moment was the ultimate historical marker.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | February 2, 1995
Babe Ruth is looking down from a baseball diamond in the sky, and he is laughing.He is laughing because he has read the 90 papers that will be presented at Hofstra University's conference April 27-29 commemorating Ruth's 100th birthday. Academics from across the country have written about half of the papers, using their diverse scholarly backgrounds to find religious imagery in Babe Ruth movies, to analyze Ruth's behavior using Freudian psychology and to compare him with characters in Shakespearean tragedies.
SPORTS
March 26, 1991
Give Royals a break* John Steadman's lambasting of the Kansas City Royals for the waiver of Bo Jackson was ridiculously off base. Why in the world should the Royals show loyalty and devotion to Jackson when Jackson has never demonstrated these qualities to the Royals? The Royals' front office would have given Jackson the world if only he would have concentrated on baseball, a concession his ego would not allow him. Now he's seriously injured as the result of his pursuit of a "hobby," and his future in any sport is in peril.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 12, 2012
It was one of the true watershed moments in Baltimore sports history, so why should anyone be surprised that Frank Deford - one of the greatest sportswriters of the modern era and a Charm City native - would be there to witness it? Well, slightly after the fact. The date was July 4, 1944 and the place was Greenmount Avenue and 29th Street, where a 5-year-old Deford stood with his mother and looked at the smoking pile of debris that remained of Oriole Park. The old wooden stadium was destroyed the night before by a fire that some now credit with helping turn Baltimore into a major league city.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 16, 2011
If you watched Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday night, you witnessed the end of one of the greatest wire-to-wire seasons in recent sports history. Tim Thomas, the former journeyman turned unlikely All-Star goalie, capped off his superlative season by leading the Bruins to their first Stanley Cup since 1972. The 37-year-old Michigan native regained his starting job from Tuukka Rask early in the season and put up some very impressive numbers for the Bruins in the regular season.
SPORTS
April 1, 2010
There's a bigger streak Shannon Ryan Chicago Tribune While individual female performances make a long and debatable list - from Billie Jean King's victory over Bobby Riggs to Jackie Joyner-Kersee's three gold medals - outstanding female teams are harder to come up with. The Connecticut women's basketball team's only rival seems to be UConn, running its tally to 76 straight victories and apparently destined for a seventh national title. But as much respect as Connecticut deserves, there is another team that has an even more impressive record and receives far less fanfare.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
Frederick W. "Fred" Brocklander III, a former National League umpire who called balls and strikes in the majors and minors for nearly 30 years, died of complications from a stroke Aug. 13 at a daughter's Severn home. He was 69. Born in Baltimore, the son of a city liquor board inspector and a homemaker, he was raised in Highlandtown. He was a 1958 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School, where he was an outstanding baseball and soccer player. He attended the University of Baltimore.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG and KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2007
Cheating, whether it occurs in sports, war, politics or academia, is as old as time. The Iliad and The Odyssey, two of mankind's oldest and greatest works of literature, are full of tales of deception and trickery, and most of it is done in the pursuit of victory. So can we really blame Michael Waltrip, the sandy-haired, aging NASCAR driver with Hasselhoff good looks, for allegedly turning a blind eye this week as his race crew tried to sneak, according to the Associated Press, a jet fuel additive into his stock car during qualifying for the Daytona 500?
NEWS
By David Kohn and Jonathan Bor and David Kohn and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2005
The steroid that Rafael Palmeiro allegedly took is a powerful drug, experts say, one not likely to be ingested unwittingly. The drug, stanozolol (sta-NOZ-ah-lol), is an anabolic steroid that has been used for decades. "It's potent. It's up there in the major leagues of anabolic steroids," said Dr. Gary Wadler of New York University, a leading expert on steroid use. Steroid experts said it was unlikely that Palmeiro had accidentally taken stanozolol. "It's virtually impossible to imagine how someone could have taken stanozolol without knowing it," Wadler said.
NEWS
November 26, 1994
Bigger is better when it comes to vehicle safety, which should be no surprise to anyone who's ever driven a Volkswagen Beetle with a mile-high 18-wheel Peterbilt breathing down his back.That conclusion is bolstered by two recent studies of driver deaths and injuries by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the affiliated Highway Loss Data Institute.Station wagons, vans and large cars had generally lower driver fatalities and passenger injuries than the average passenger vehicle. Higher death and injury rates were typically reported for categories of smaller vehicles, including sports cars, pickup trucks and utility vehicles.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | October 19, 1995
The Baseball Network concept of regionalized playoff telecasts remains a critical bomb, but the viewing public seems a lot more willing to forgive than scribes or telecasters, though not completely.Three of the games in the league championship series broadcast last week landed in the top 14 of the most widely viewed shows of the week, and if Baltimore's preliminary figures for the sixth game of the American League series are any gauge, Tuesday's Cleveland-Seattle finale may have done impressive business.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
The Westside Preakness Parade, replete with marching bands and cheerleaders, renewed a venerable tradition yesterday as it streamed along Eutaw Street. But the procession ended at the doorstep of Baltimore's latest sports-culture attraction. The true main event for crowds gathered downtown was the grand opening of Sports Legends at Camden Yards, a museum in the former Baltimore and Ohio Railroad station that showcases Maryland sports and social history. Fifteen years in the making, the attraction is an extension of the Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum on Emory Street, near the neighborhood where Ruth spent his youth in an orphanage.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2005
LAKE PLACID, N.Y. -- Americans have never really gotten over their love affair with the "Miracle on Ice" game, played 25 years ago today between U.S. amateurs and the Soviet hockey machine. Here, in this village with the snow-globe good looks, parents still bring their children to the rink to pose and play. They visit the Olympic museum one floor below to watch the grainy videotape of that magical win and reconnect with a glorious moment when underdogs triumphed. Lore has it that on the night of the victory, a U.S. warship sent a message to a Soviet vessel nearby that said simply, "4-3," the final score.
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