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SPORTS
By Everett Cook and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
The Ravens are the 18th-most valuable sports franchise in the world, according to Forbes' list of the World's Most Valuable Sports Teams. The Ravens, who have made the playoffs the past four years and are owned by Steve Bisciotti, are valued at $1.09 billion dollars. The NFL, as usual, was represented well on the Forbes list. All 32 teams were on the list of 50 organizations, including two of the top five. According to the list, the Ravens are the 10th-most valuable NFL franchise, behind the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, New England Patriots, New York Giants, New York Jets, Houston Texans, Philadelphia Eagles, Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 24, 2014
Being a native Philadelphian and currently a resident of eastern Baltimore County, I am anything but a Redskins fan. However, I cannot understand why anyone would be offended by the team's name ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). In fact, Native Americans should feel proud that a team, especially one based in the nation's capital, would honor the fighting spirit of Native Americans by naming itself after them. A football team seeks to win every time it takes the field.
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NEWS
June 24, 2014
Being a native Philadelphian and currently a resident of eastern Baltimore County, I am anything but a Redskins fan. However, I cannot understand why anyone would be offended by the team's name ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). In fact, Native Americans should feel proud that a team, especially one based in the nation's capital, would honor the fighting spirit of Native Americans by naming itself after them. A football team seeks to win every time it takes the field.
NEWS
By Marty Conway | February 10, 2013
When the Baltimore Ravens won Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans last week, the team crossed a threshold for sports franchises: They joined 11 other teams in the National Football League to have won more than one Super Bowl in the 47 years the game has been played. It is a mark of distinction in sports, to be sure. But long before the Ravens became Super Bowl XLVII champions, they crossed another threshold in sports, one that can be every bit as difficult to achieve as becoming a consistent winner on the field.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
Bowie Kuhn, who stood on baseball's firing line for 15 years as commissioner, still doesn't see eye-to-eye with major-league owners, at least on the issue of leadership.Kuhn thinks the owners should be more receptive to filling their commissioner's vacancy and less concerned with throwing that person to the wolves."I have a certain bias about there being a commissioner in place," Kuhn said yesterday as he watched the Orioles-Chicago White Sox game at Camden Yards. "I disagree with their approach of not having one. I understand what is bothering them.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
They've done it again. The Yankees. Who else but the Yankees? Twenty-six world titles - the most by any pro sports franchise in American history - isn't enough to satisfy them. It's not enough that they spend more money, year after year, than any other club. They have to buy up everybody else's stars, just to remind the poor pretenders how far they really are from playing in the big leagues. And so it was again yesterday, when owner-omnivore George Steinbrenner finalized a deal that brought him the best, most expensive player in the known universe, slugging infielder Alex Rodriguez, a k a A-Rod.
SPORTS
July 23, 1995
NFL out of the question hereLeave it to the running rebel Al Davis, the man who started this parade of NFL franchise shifts in 1982, to take his Raiders back to Oakland, realizing 13 years later that his move to the larger L.A. market didn't quite pan out the way he had envisioned.If Davis had kept his Raiders in Oakland in the first place, Robert Irsay never would have had the courage to move the Colts out of Baltimore.But why is it that Oakland, St. Louis, Jacksonville and Charlotte got the NFL franchises they wanted?
SPORTS
May 27, 2012
Upward to $3 billion Steve Gould Baltimore Sun An awful lot of money. We're talking way more than any American sports team has been sold for before. Forbes valued the Yankees at $1.85 billion in March, and the general belief among experts and analysts seems to be that, in the wake of the Dodgers' being sold for $2.15 billion later that month, the Yankees would command about $3 billion. Much of that value is tied to the team's stake in YES, its regional sports network.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 14, 1995
Lost in all the tumult and turmoil that affected the American body politic in the 1960s was the upheaval that turned the sports culture on its ear, as virtually everything that touched the society at large, from protests to drug use and everything in between, invaded the athletic realm.The volatility of the era is painstakingly captured in yet another wonderful HBO documentary, "Fields of Fire: Sports in the '60s," which premieres tonight at 10, with repeats Thursday and Saturday.Narrated by Richie Havens, a musical legend of the era, "Fields of Fire" closely examines the impact of the Vietnam War on pTC sports, the struggles of women to find their place in athletics, the explosion of television, and baseball's reserve clause, as well as a tribute to Joe Namath.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
The Orlando Magic organization is supposed to be run like any other professional sports franchise. The GM makes decisions regarding personnel. He gives the team assembled to a coach, who does his best to put a winning product out on the court. The owner pays for it all. But the Magic aren't like most other franchises, because they have a superstar who thinks he is bigger than the game.  Dwight Howard has been the coach, general manager and star player in Orlando for about two years now . He has been holding the entire organization hostage as it tries to appease a flip-flopping All-World center who can't seem to make up his mind. This is just another chapter in a growing narrative of selfish, me-first NBA players who just refuse to play with the cards they're dealt.
SPORTS
By Everett Cook and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2012
The Ravens are the 18th-most valuable sports franchise in the world, according to Forbes' list of the World's Most Valuable Sports Teams. The Ravens, who have made the playoffs the past four years and are owned by Steve Bisciotti, are valued at $1.09 billion dollars. The NFL, as usual, was represented well on the Forbes list. All 32 teams were on the list of 50 organizations, including two of the top five. According to the list, the Ravens are the 10th-most valuable NFL franchise, behind the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, New England Patriots, New York Giants, New York Jets, Houston Texans, Philadelphia Eagles, Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers.
SPORTS
By Steven Petrella and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
The Orlando Magic organization is supposed to be run like any other professional sports franchise. The GM makes decisions regarding personnel. He gives the team assembled to a coach, who does his best to put a winning product out on the court. The owner pays for it all. But the Magic aren't like most other franchises, because they have a superstar who thinks he is bigger than the game.  Dwight Howard has been the coach, general manager and star player in Orlando for about two years now . He has been holding the entire organization hostage as it tries to appease a flip-flopping All-World center who can't seem to make up his mind. This is just another chapter in a growing narrative of selfish, me-first NBA players who just refuse to play with the cards they're dealt.
SPORTS
May 27, 2012
Upward to $3 billion Steve Gould Baltimore Sun An awful lot of money. We're talking way more than any American sports team has been sold for before. Forbes valued the Yankees at $1.85 billion in March, and the general belief among experts and analysts seems to be that, in the wake of the Dodgers' being sold for $2.15 billion later that month, the Yankees would command about $3 billion. Much of that value is tied to the team's stake in YES, its regional sports network.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
The Greene Turtle keeps reproducing. The McHenry Row location in Locust Point will be opening in a matter of weeks, and a Pasadena location opened quietly at the end of October on Magothy Beach Road. The Pasadena location is operated by James King, a former member of the Maryland General Assembly, who owns both Kaufmann's Tavern and King Catering in Gambrills. Including McHenry Row, that makes, by my count, 30 Greene Turtles. Pretty impressive for the Md.-based sports-bar franchise, which first opened in Ocean City 1976.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Reporter | September 13, 2006
Kyle Boller is an NFL quarterback, a son of a firefighter and a former companion of actress Tara Reid. Now the Raven can add another description to his name: owner. On Aug. 31, the American Basketball Association - a minor league - announced that Boller had joined an ownership group that formed the Hollywood Fame. Boller - a partner with, among others, singer Nick Lachey, Dancing with the Stars fan favorite and Rosedale native Stacy Keibler and former Oriole Brady Anderson - majored in American studies with an emphasis on education at California, but said he has always wanted to own a business.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2004
They've done it again. The Yankees. Who else but the Yankees? Twenty-six world titles - the most by any pro sports franchise in American history - isn't enough to satisfy them. It's not enough that they spend more money, year after year, than any other club. They have to buy up everybody else's stars, just to remind the poor pretenders how far they really are from playing in the big leagues. And so it was again yesterday, when owner-omnivore George Steinbrenner finalized a deal that brought him the best, most expensive player in the known universe, slugging infielder Alex Rodriguez, a k a A-Rod.
NEWS
By Marty Conway | February 10, 2013
When the Baltimore Ravens won Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans last week, the team crossed a threshold for sports franchises: They joined 11 other teams in the National Football League to have won more than one Super Bowl in the 47 years the game has been played. It is a mark of distinction in sports, to be sure. But long before the Ravens became Super Bowl XLVII champions, they crossed another threshold in sports, one that can be every bit as difficult to achieve as becoming a consistent winner on the field.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun Reporter | September 13, 2006
Kyle Boller is an NFL quarterback, a son of a firefighter and a former companion of actress Tara Reid. Now the Raven can add another description to his name: owner. On Aug. 31, the American Basketball Association - a minor league - announced that Boller had joined an ownership group that formed the Hollywood Fame. Boller - a partner with, among others, singer Nick Lachey, Dancing with the Stars fan favorite and Rosedale native Stacy Keibler and former Oriole Brady Anderson - majored in American studies with an emphasis on education at California, but said he has always wanted to own a business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | July 20, 1996
Comsat Corp. said yesterday that Chief Executive Officer Bruce L. Crockett resigned, as the Bethesda satellite company also announced the latest in a series of earnings disappointments that it warned would stretch into late 1996.Crockett, who had come under fire for sagging earnings and a lagging stock, said he was leaving to pursue unspecified "other business interests." The company said he will be replaced by Betty C. Alewine, 48, who has been in charge of the company's biggest business unit.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 14, 1995
Lost in all the tumult and turmoil that affected the American body politic in the 1960s was the upheaval that turned the sports culture on its ear, as virtually everything that touched the society at large, from protests to drug use and everything in between, invaded the athletic realm.The volatility of the era is painstakingly captured in yet another wonderful HBO documentary, "Fields of Fire: Sports in the '60s," which premieres tonight at 10, with repeats Thursday and Saturday.Narrated by Richie Havens, a musical legend of the era, "Fields of Fire" closely examines the impact of the Vietnam War on pTC sports, the struggles of women to find their place in athletics, the explosion of television, and baseball's reserve clause, as well as a tribute to Joe Namath.
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