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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
You think sports fans are superstitious? That baseball players have the corner on game-day rituals? I say they've got nothing on parents whose baby just slept through the night for the first time in weeks. After a couple of months of being solidly spoiled by several hours in a row of glorious sleep thanks to a sleeping baby, my husband and I were completely thrashed when he suddenly stopped sleeping more than a handful of hours at a stretch. And this continued for days and days, probably months if we calculated it (which trust me, we don't want to do)
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Just seven days ago, Baltimore's sports fans, the faithful clad in orange and purple, were brimming with optimism. The Ravens were set to open what they hoped would be a bounce-back season with star running back Ray Rice due to return at the end of the week from a two-game suspension for a domestic violence incident - a penalty roundly criticized as too light. The Orioles, meanwhile, were rolling toward a division title, leading their nearest rivals by a margin they hadn't enjoyed in decades.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Just seven days ago, Baltimore's sports fans, the faithful clad in orange and purple, were brimming with optimism. The Ravens were set to open what they hoped would be a bounce-back season with star running back Ray Rice due to return at the end of the week from a two-game suspension for a domestic violence incident - a penalty roundly criticized as too light. The Orioles, meanwhile, were rolling toward a division title, leading their nearest rivals by a margin they hadn't enjoyed in decades.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Edgar Allan Poe once wrote that those who dream during the day "are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night. " So it seems entirely fitting that Baltimore can spend the first Purple Friday - or dare we say, Orange-Purple Friday - of September daydreaming of a Ravens-Orioles championship season. Technically, the Ravens can't win a championship in 2014, as that feat was accomplished by some team out of Seattle last winter (coincidentally, a fellow member of the bird family)
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | March 20, 2011
Generally, I'm not big on all these "Best of" and "Worst of" lists that seem to crop up every five minutes. You know the ones: "Top 10 Best Cities to Live In," "Twenty Worst Rock Songs of All Time," "Fifteen Dumbest Commercials," etc. But when GQ magazine came out with its list of "The Worst Sports Fans in America," I got sucked in. Especially since it promised to feature "the bottle-throwers, couch-torchers and projectile-vomiters marring our...
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | June 23, 2010
Even if you're not into soccer, I hope you saw this one. This was a finish for the ages, as good as it gets in any sport you can name. This was the U.S. vs. Algeria in the World Cup on Wednesday, loser goes home, a tense match made even more nail-biting by the fact the Americans kept finding new and creative ways to blow easy goal-scoring opportunities. When Landon Donovan scored his thrilling rebound shot in the 91st minute -- three more minutes and the U.S. would have been packing its bags to go home instead of advancing with a 1-0 win -- the crowd around me at Slainte Irish Pub in Fells Point erupted.
NEWS
By Barbara Brotman | June 2, 1999
RESERVE the Barcalounger and pour me a tall, frosty mug of 1 percent milk. It's time for my kind of spectator sport -- the 1999 Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee, which will be held today and tomorrow in Washington.Words are, ironically, almost insufficient to describe my love of spelling bees. In a sports-obsessed world, they are a non-athlete's sweet delight.They are pinnacles of studious achievement, showcases of familiarity with Latin roots, rare public rewards for people given to reading the dictionary for fun.And the world series of spelling bees is the Scripps Howard.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 15, 2006
I truly love those rare occasions when sports becomes something much bigger than a game, when the boundary lines between the playing field and our everyday lives blur. And I truly hate when it's artificial, when we assign profound meaning to something that simply defies logic or explanation, pretending sports is the framework when it's really just faint background noise. That's why it was so laughable to hear ad nauseam last week that when New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle's plane crashed into a Manhattan high-rise, we were suddenly given this sharpened sense of understanding, that the death of a major league pitcher was what we all really needed to put sports into proper perspective.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | September 29, 1999
Parents often lament that their sons are not enthusiastic readers. Yet these same boys can be found devouring sports magazines and the sports pages of newspapers. If you are trying to encourage your boy child to read, play to this strength. Introduce him to sports books.Jim Trelease, in "The Read-Aloud Handbook," suggests these authors.* Matt Christopher, the most popular sports author for grades 1-4* Alfred Slote, grades 5-7* Thomas J. Dygard, grades 7-10* John R. Tunis, a writer from the 1930s through the 1960s.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2005
It's late afternoon at one of Baltimore's most beloved museums, and in the shafts of light streaming through the windows, three curators stand in a contemplative circle, scrutinizing the life-size, full-color treasure on the wall. Its colors are brilliant, its condition excellent. None has seen a more sensitive portrayal. So Michael Gibbons, director of Sports Legends at Camden Yards, and his two colleagues set a price on Johnny Unitas, Quarterback of the Century: $200. "He's gonna look great over somebody's bar," says the museum's curator, Shawn Herne.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Two years ago, when the Orioles unleashed the region's pent-up baseball passion with their first playoff run in years, they did it by walking baseball's version of a tightrope. They played a lot of nail-biters - winning 29 games by just one run. They snatched 16 of 18 in extra innings. They didn't nab a wild-card playoff spot until the last week of the season. This year has been a steadier march. These O's have seen no major streaks, good or bad, but they've won six or so games out of every 10, climbing to the top of the American League East, where they've been since early July.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
A memorial service for Charles Edward "Chub" Wagner and his wife, Jeannine Wagner, who both died Nov. 7 when their car was involved in a three-vehicle crash in Sparks, will be held at 11 a.m. Nov. 23 at Timonium United Methodist Church, 2300 Pot Spring Road. The drivers of the two other cars involved in the collision were cited with driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. The Wagners had been married for 62 years and lived in Towson. Mr. Wagner was the co-founder of an industrial pump business.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - Scott Van Pelt is joking that he may have gone too far this time, that Maryland may turn on him for his pointed criticism about the droves of fans who abandoned Byrd Stadium's student section before the end of the Terps ' one-point win over rival Virginia on Oct. 12. The ESPN commentator, radio show host and former Maryland student says he expects the stadium to be packed for this Saturday's homecoming game against Clemson, "and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Network TV never knows when to stop shilling, selling, hyping and hustling its audience. It's like a law of physics that whenever a network creates something of quality, it must always find a way to cheapen the product in trying to squeeze every last penny plus one out of it. That was the big story with NBC's pregame coverage of the Ravens 49-27 debacle in Denver Thursday night. The network's "Sunday Night Football" franchise is one of the epic success stories of prime-time TV, a winning hybrid of sports and pop culture programming that draws a larger audience than any sports program in history.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
As tens of thousands of Baltimore sports fans packed downtown to watch country music star Keith Urban kick off the NFL season and the Orioles' win at home, some of the lingering exasperation that the Ravens were playing out of town faded away. "It was frustrating that the Orioles couldn't move their game," said Kevin Williams, who was celebrating his 53rd birthday at the harbor with friends. "But this is the next best thing. And it's free, you know. " Over at Camden Yards, some Orioles fans were ducking out early to catch the Ravens on TV. But manager Buck Showalter didn't seem to mind.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 5, 2013
Baltimore's Ravens, reigning champions of professional football, kick off their new season Thursday night on national television while its Orioles once again have reached September with a shot at the playoffs. What's not to like? Plenty, say some Baltimore sports fans. For one thing - actually, the main thing - the Ravens will play the Broncos in Denver, a mile high and 1,700 miles from home. This marks the first time since the custom began that the Super Bowl champion won't host the National Football League Kickoff, the opening game of the season.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | April 6, 1992
Charles Woolston renews a spring ritual today, attending the Orioles game just as he has every opening day since 1964, celebrating the beginning of baseball just as he did as a young boy on the Eastern Shore.The assistant provost at University of Maryland Baltimore County, Dr. Woolston, 52, admits to being as passionate and emotional a fan as anyone else.But, as the professor who teaches a course called Sports and American Culture every fall semester, he has more than a rooting interest in the game.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 30, 1994
Every Sunday afternoon was golden. The athletes played only for love of the game. And the stands were always full of Baltimore fans -- the best sports fans in the world.That's pretty much the rose-colored view of "Gone But Not Forgotten II," another nostalgia-rama from Maryland Public Television. "Gone II," which airs at 8 tonight on Channels 22 and 67, revisits Maryland sports franchises and leagues from the 1930s to the '50s.Baltimore Sun columnist Dan Rodricks narrates the program. It's important for readers to know that I consider Rodricks a friend.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
There is something wonderfully nutty about the beginning of the National Football League season - that outrageously hyped and often appallingly violent national, made-for-TV gladiatorial pastime - and this year, Baltimore is knee-deep in it. As defending Super Bowl champions (ah, to have a nickel for each time that phrase is used in this town), the Ravens play the Broncos to officially kick off the regular season Thursday night. Naturally, the plot lines are thick and winding.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
The race car - what's left of it - sits in a yard in Middle River, a rusty hulk entombed by weeds. The engine's gone; the tires rotted. "It ain't very pretty to look at," Pete Kantorsky, Jr. said of the 1937 Ford. But one man's junk is another's treasure. Sitting by his old jalopy, which he drove at Dorsey Speedway in the 1960s, Kantorsky pats the side of the run-down stock car as a jockey might greet an aging racehorse. "I see this car and I think about the good times and the bad," he said.
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