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NEWS
By Marty Conway | June 2, 2014
The recent three-day 2014 NCAA Men's Lacrosse championship event at M&T Stadium drew the lowest attendance yet - 78,234 - since Baltimore introduced it to NFL stadiums in 2003. And the Baltimore Ravens, the main stadium tenant, did not submit a bid to host the event in 2015 through 2018 in part because of potential parking lot conflicts during simultaneous Orioles games. How does this happen with a sporting event and geographic region, that seem to be so right for one another? With the sport's national governing body, US Lacrosse, here, along with the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame,  there is little doubt about the depth of both participation and support for the sport locally, and within 100 miles from Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Marty Conway | June 2, 2014
The recent three-day 2014 NCAA Men's Lacrosse championship event at M&T Stadium drew the lowest attendance yet - 78,234 - since Baltimore introduced it to NFL stadiums in 2003. And the Baltimore Ravens, the main stadium tenant, did not submit a bid to host the event in 2015 through 2018 in part because of potential parking lot conflicts during simultaneous Orioles games. How does this happen with a sporting event and geographic region, that seem to be so right for one another? With the sport's national governing body, US Lacrosse, here, along with the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame,  there is little doubt about the depth of both participation and support for the sport locally, and within 100 miles from Baltimore.
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SPORTS
April 15, 1991
Health Secretary Louis Sullivan may think sports and the tobacco industry make a lousy marriage, but Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL don't agree.Sullivan has asked fans to boycott sports events such as Virginia Slims tennis and Winston Cup auto racing, which are sponsored by tobacco companies. But of the 454 callers to SUNDIAL over the weekend, only 167 (37 percent) said they would not attend such a sports event. The other 287 (63 percent) said they would attend an athletic event that was sponsored by a tobacco company.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
Thirty years ago last month, the Baltimore Colts left town, and the loss of the beloved NFL franchise was a stunning blow not only to football fans but to the city's identify. Nine years later, Baltimore's image as a sports town suffered another big hit when, after getting passed over for an expansion franchise, then-NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue famously suggested a museum be purchased for the city instead. The beauty of that "Let them eat fossils and Pre-Columbian art" put-down was that it not only implied that an NFL team would never be coming to Baltimore but that the city had a cultural deficit, too. Whatever chip on the shoulder Baltimore had from the day of the Mayflower moving vans suddenly got a lot heavier.
NEWS
December 29, 2009
I'll leave it to your Kevin Van Valkenburg to decide what he thought the Top 10 sports events were - that's his prerogative as a columnist. However, I am writing to question his decision to only mention the Maryland men's NCAA title in his narrative leading up to the final selections. What about the women? They won a title too. Even if Mr. Van Valkenburg didn't see it or appreciate it - others apparently did. Sports Illustrated named it the top women's game of the decade! What gives? Tricia O'Neill, Lutherville
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
Play-by-play sports radio is going the way of the dinosaur, at least on the American Forces Network. Responding to a survey that indicates military personnel and civilian employees overseas would rather watch than listen to sports events, the AFN has decided to drop radio play-by-play broadcasts by the end of the summer. The decision was based on a worldwide audience survey, conducted by the Department of Defense, of approximately 9,500 military and civilian employees stationed overseas.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | January 18, 1991
The TV repairman: No one has yet come up with a good reason why sports events or just about anything else should be canceled or postponed because of the Persian Gulf (undeclared) war. Therefore, the people calling the shots for pro or amateur sports shouldn't be regarded as insensitive clods and subversives for carrying on.Van Gordon Sauter, former head of CBS News and Sports, told The National yesterday, "Networks have a moral responsibility to advise the nation on any consequential actions in the outside world that would affect our society, and that includes breaking into sports events."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | December 4, 1995
Longtime readers of this space, and especially those who are easily startled, are advised to sit down and refrain from imbibing anything that might shoot out quickly when you read the next paragraph, which contains words never before seen in this column.Way to go, Comcast.We're speaking, of course, of the cable company's decision to switch the status of Home Team Sports from a premium channel to that of basic, starting Dec. 31, in its three suburban systems in Baltimore, Harford and Howard counties, affecting 300,000 subscribers.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | July 25, 1992
The Inner Harbor's next major attraction may be a $30 million sports museum featuring ABC TV's "Wide World of Sports" program and Baltimore native Jim McKay, if Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke accepts the recommendation of a blue-ribbon panel.Called Sports Center USA, the entertainment center would be the first of its kind in the nation. Motion simulators, video, a large-screen theater and "virtual reality" computer technology are among the concepts under consideration.Visitors could participate in interactive exhibits that simulate various sports events and experiences, such as skiing down a mountain slope.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | April 19, 1998
25 years ago:Friday morning started gray and rainy, much to the dismay of residents of the Union Bridge area. For Friday was the day that Sgt. Peter Edward Drabic, son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Drabic of Lightner St., was finally returning to his hometown after 4 1/2 years of captivity in Vietnam. But by 3 p.m., when the expectant crowd began gathering at the edge of town, excitement and laughter mingling with tears, the day had turned sunny and warm. It was a made-to-order day for Union Bridge to welcome back its own personal hero of the long Vietnam conflict.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Water? Check. Playbook? Check. AED? Check. When Baltimore area middle school coaches take their teams to a sporting event, they are increasingly adding some new equipment to the list of necessary supplies: automated external defibrillators. The devices are perhaps most frequently associated with helping people middle-aged and older in cardiac emergencies, but statistics show that sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death and is a major concern for young athletes, too. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, about 3,000 young people die every year from cardiac arrest.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
As tens of thousands of Baltimore sports fans packed downtown to watch country music star Keith Urban kick off the NFL season and the Orioles' win at home, some of the lingering exasperation that the Ravens were playing out of town faded away. "It was frustrating that the Orioles couldn't move their game," said Kevin Williams, who was celebrating his 53rd birthday at the harbor with friends. "But this is the next best thing. And it's free, you know. " Over at Camden Yards, some Orioles fans were ducking out early to catch the Ravens on TV. But manager Buck Showalter didn't seem to mind.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Ticketmaster and other ticket sellers could add unlimited fees to the price of admission for concerts and sporting events under legislation approved by a key City Council committee on Tuesday. The committee gutted a bill that sought to limit "convenience" fees for processing and other services. The fees are sometimes split by the ticket sellers and the venues hosting the events. The decision won praise from ticket sellers and their venue clients — who packed the City Council chambers with lawyers and lobbyists — but criticism from a consumer rights group that advocated for lower fees.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Four members of the Harlem Globetrotters will take turns dribbling and spinning basketballs during a 7.7 mile walk from the Inner Harbor to Towson University's new arena Monday morning. The Globetrotters -- who, according to a Reuters report, are up for sale -- will be the first sports team to play in the new 5,200-seat arena when they open a three-game set on Wednesday night at 7 p.m. Eric Nemeth, the 87-year-old organization's senior director of event publicity, said the team -- which makes an annual stop at 1st Mariner Arena around Christmas -- wanted to mark the opening of the arena with a unique event.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
A visibly increased police presence greeted Orioles fans Tuesday as they ventured to Camden Yards for Baltimore's first major sporting event since the previous day's deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon. Nonetheless, fans, players and team officials spoke defiantly of refusing to give up day-to-day pleasures because of the specter of terror. "There are so many places where someone could do so many things that you can't worry about everything," said Kevin Ridgely of Severna Park, who attended the game with his 19-year-old son, Will.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
Baltimore's 1st Mariner Arena will host the Colonial Athletic Association men's basketball tournament for three years, starting in 2014, officials from the city and league confirmed Wednesday. The city now offers a centralized location for the conference, CAA commissioner Tom Yeager said, and more amenities than long-time host Richmond. "It's closer for many of our fans," Yeager said after a news conference at Visit Baltimore's offices downtown. "And while we hope they're there to watch basketball, we realize that they're focused on having a good weekend.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 12, 2000
WASHINGTON -- This month the pulse of higher education reaches a crescendo with "March Madness," the college basketball championship tournament. So 'tis a season for a surge in sports gambling. This is a problem, for two reasons. One is that gambling on sports is pervasive, and mostly illegal. Widespread and casual illegality undermines legality. The second reason is why Congress, in 1992, made almost all sports gambling illegal: Substantial sums wagered on sports events are potential threats to the integrity of the competition.
NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Staff writer | January 26, 1992
Superintendent Michael E. Hickey's proposed $105,000 reduction in the school system's 1992-1993 athletics budget comes with a warning that deeper cuts appear imminent.Hickey's proposal aims to eliminateworkshop pay for all soccer coaches and junior varsity football coaches, decrease the need for security at evening and weekend games by moving those events to the afternoon, and to curtail uniform purchases.The cuts are part of a $183.7 million budget Hickey proposed lastweek. Under Hickey's proposal, the athletics budget would be reducedfrom $1.3 million to $1.2 million.
NEWS
August 26, 2012
How ironic that The Sun should publish another letter from a racing hater complaining about traffic problems on the same day that it ran a picture of the people fighting the traffic problems caused by last week's Ravens game ("Baltimore isn't Le Mans," Aug. 24). If we're going to base which sporting events the city is going to host based on traffic disruptions, then we'd better get rid of the Orioles and the Ravens before we do away with the Baltimore Grand Prix. In terms of the total number of hours of people struggling with traffic, the Grand Prix causes but a fraction of the problem caused by our two major league sports teams.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
Luxury boxes at major sporting events. Sold-out concerts. Galas. Vegas shows. Baltimore's lawmakers often receive tickets for shows and other popular events from developers, business people, corporations and nonprofits as one of the perks of office. Over three years, elected officials in City Hall reported getting more than 170 tickets worth more than $15,000, according to the most recent filings available. City Hall has strengthened ethics laws after Mayor Sheila Dixon pleaded guilty to perjury charges two years ago and agreed to resign after failing to disclose gifts from a developer boyfriend.
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