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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
Hundreds of gallons of sports drinks will be poured down the throats of 7,000 runners pounding the streets of the city in the Baltimore Marathon this Saturday. Will those drinks do as promised, help make those 26 miles, 385 yards go by easily and painlessly? Well, yes and no. To understand the ambiguity, go back to the beginnings of what is now a $2.6 billion-a-year business. In the mid-1960s, Dr. Robert Cade, a researcher at the University of Florida, looked into an interesting question: Why don't football players have to relieve themselves during games?
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
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SPORTS
By Jacqueline R. Berning, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
As a sport dietitian, I find it very interesting to be on the sideline listening to what parents and players have to say about feeding and hydrating lacrosse players. Where do they get this information? Do they really believe that three Red Bulls before a game will improve performance? Here are the three common sports nutrition myths heard on the sidelines: MYTH: Players do not need to eat carbohydrates because lacrosse is a sprinting sport, not an endurance event. FACT: The game of lacrosse involves lots of sprinting and jogging, and very little walking.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
A Beverly Hills sports drink maker being sued by Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. says the trademark infringement lawsuit is without merit, according to court documents filed Thursday. The lawsuit filed April 26 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore says drink maker Body Armor Nutrition LLC uses a brand name and logo that confuses consumers. The complaint seeks an injunction banning the California company from using the name Body Armor and a logo and tagline that Under Armour says is similar to its own. Body Armor's court filing says it would be nearly impossible for consumers to confuse brands that sell unrelated products.
NEWS
June 25, 2000
Tips to care for your body while working out in the summer heat: Drink water before, during and after your game, practice or workout. In fact, 8 ounces of water every 15 minutes is recommended. Water or sports drinks? Water is cheaper and best for most people. Mineral-laced sports drinks are OK for adults into extreme exercise, but some contain more salt, sugar and calories than children need. Avoid germs. Use disposable cups or your own, personal water container. Insulated quart- and half-gallon containers that are durable are plentiful -- and cheap -- at most discount and sporting goods stores.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Special to The Sun | August 1, 1995
Q: My daughter loves sports and is very active during the day. I'm afraid to let her be too active during these hot summer days -- can't she get heatstroke?A: We can only answer your question in general terms because we don't know your daughter's age nor whether she is in good physical shape. Both these points are important: children are less able to get rid of the body heat generated during exercise than adolescents, and a child's body has the capacity over time to adapt to the stress imposed by exercising in hot weather.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
"Powered by Me: Playing Safe, Fair and Sober," a program for coaches, athletes and parents on the use of steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs -- as well as energy drinks and sports drinks -- will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. The "Powered by Me" program is sponsored statewide by St. Joseph's Hospital. HC Drug Free is co-sponsoring it in Howard County with the Wilde Lake High School PTSA and boosters. The National Collegiate Athletic Association-certified substance-abuse education program will address the pressures on athletes to excel, the use of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing substances to increase strength, power, speed and endurance, the short- and long-term physical and psychological effects of use, and how to get help.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 16, 1999
WHEN THE SUMMER weather turns nasty, I seek comfort in cold beverages.There are a handful of alcoholic beverages that I consider counter agents to hot weather. Among them are bottles of cold beer and gin rickeys -- soothing concoctions made with a shot of gin, juice of half a lime, a large dose of ice cubes and club soda. But since these potations pack a wallop, I wait until the end of the day to administer them.For midday relief, I seek something nonalcoholic that will make me shiver. On a recent sizzling afternoon, I opened the family refrigerator and considered the array of chilly countermeasures to the day's heat.
NEWS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | May 4, 2006
A ban on calorie-laden soft drinks in schools is not necessarily a blow to the giant beverage companies that sell them. Instead, the voluntary ban could boost their public images as well as their bottom lines, several experts said yesterday. "The companies are worried about the avalanche of bad press they've received about predatory marketing in our schools," said Gary Ruskin, executive director of Commercial Alert, a nonprofit critical of commercialism in schools. "This will help alleviate their [public relations]
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | August 24, 1993
Training too much can injure athletes and hamper their performance. A group of researchers from Australia showed that a sustained rise in blood levels of norepinephrine, the body's natural stimulant, is associated with a decrease in performance and the overtraining syndrome. Their findings were published in the June 1993 issue of the journal Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise.Training for athletic competition is like going to the well. You want to be as close to the edge as possible, but you don't want to fall in. Athletic training is done by stressing your body, then allowing enough time for your body to recover before you stress it again.
EXPLORE
By Nikki Highsmith Vernick | May 30, 2012
Growing up in Texas, I played fast pitch softball. After playing in the hot Texas sun, our team, the Sweetpeas, had a snack of oranges and water, in containers brought from home. Today, my husband and I are new Howard County residents and we have gotten our children, ages 6 and 4, involved in sports activities, beginning with T-ball. We have been struck by the well-groomed baseball fields and the engaged volunteer parents. We were impressed with it all — until the post-game snacks came out. Over the last three weeks, these snacks have included chips, fruit roll-ups, sugary rice treats, chocolate-covered doughnuts with rainbow sprinkles, assorted fruit punch and sports drinks.
NEWS
By Nikki Highsmith Vernick | May 14, 2012
Growing up in Texas, I played softball - fast pitch. After playing in the hot Texas sun, our team, the Sweetpeas, had a snack of oranges and water, in containers brought from home. Today, my husband and I are new Howard County residents, and we have gotten our children, ages 6 and 4, involved in sports activities, beginning with T-ball. We have been struck by the well-groomed baseball fields and the engaged volunteer parents. We were impressed with it all - until the post-game snacks came out. Over the last three weeks, these snacks have included chips, fruit roll-ups, sugary rice treats, chocolate-covered doughnuts with rainbow sprinkles, assorted fruit punch, and sports drinks.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. is accusing Beverly Hills sports drink maker Body Armor Nutrition LLC of trademark infringement for using a brand name and logo that confuses consumers, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court. The sports apparel maker filed the case in U.S. District Court in Baltimore on April 26, seeking an injunction banning the California company from using the name Body Armor, a logo that resembles Under Armour's interlocking U and A, or the tagline Protect + Restore, which Under Armour says is similar to its tagline, Protect This House.
SPORTS
By Jacqueline R. Berning, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
As a sport dietitian, I find it very interesting to be on the sideline listening to what parents and players have to say about feeding and hydrating lacrosse players. Where do they get this information? Do they really believe that three Red Bulls before a game will improve performance? Here are the three common sports nutrition myths heard on the sidelines: MYTH: Players do not need to eat carbohydrates because lacrosse is a sprinting sport, not an endurance event. FACT: The game of lacrosse involves lots of sprinting and jogging, and very little walking.
NEWS
By Peter L. Beilenson and Rich Krieg | July 24, 2011
A recent Harvard School of Public Health study indicated that potatoes, especially chips or fries, but even boiled ones, contribute more to weight gain than other foods. But rather than putting the question to rest, the finding prompted the U.S. Potato Board to provide the public with precisely the opposite advice: "There is no evidence that potatoes, when prepared in a healthful manner, contribute to weight gain. … In fact, they are one of the most naturally nutrient dense vegetables available.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
"Powered by Me: Playing Safe, Fair and Sober," a program for coaches, athletes and parents on the use of steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs -- as well as energy drinks and sports drinks -- will be held from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake High School. The "Powered by Me" program is sponsored statewide by St. Joseph's Hospital. HC Drug Free is co-sponsoring it in Howard County with the Wilde Lake High School PTSA and boosters. The National Collegiate Athletic Association-certified substance-abuse education program will address the pressures on athletes to excel, the use of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing substances to increase strength, power, speed and endurance, the short- and long-term physical and psychological effects of use, and how to get help.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Reporter Meredith Cohn 's recent article about the World Health Organization's new sugar recommendations highlighted the concerns of medical and public health experts over the epidemic of childhood obesity ( "Officials urge consumers to cut back on sugar," March 21). Sugar in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages is in fact the leading contributor to the obesity epidemic. According to the Institute of Medicine's 2012 report, a full 20 percent of the nation's weight increase since 1977 can be directly attributed to sugary drinks like soda, sports drinks, energy drinks and sweetened juices and teas.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 8, 2005
I drink at least eight large glasses of water every day to maintain good health. When I play soccer or tennis, I force myself to drink a lot more. I recently heard that you can drink too much water. What are the consequences? People have been led to believe that they need to drink a lot of water to stay healthy, especially if they are exercising vigorously. But new research suggests that there are hazards to overdosing on fluids. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine (April 14, 2005)
NEWS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | May 4, 2006
A ban on calorie-laden soft drinks in schools is not necessarily a blow to the giant beverage companies that sell them. Instead, the voluntary ban could boost their public images as well as their bottom lines, several experts said yesterday. "The companies are worried about the avalanche of bad press they've received about predatory marketing in our schools," said Gary Ruskin, executive director of Commercial Alert, a nonprofit critical of commercialism in schools. "This will help alleviate their [public relations]
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY AND JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and LIZ F. KAY AND JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTERS | May 4, 2006
America's largest beverage makers pledged yesterday to stop selling their signature sodas and other high-sugar drinks in the nation's schools as part of an agreement with health care groups who allege that soft drinks contribute to an epidemic of childhood obesity. The agreement permits only water, low-fat milk and unsweetened juice to be sold in elementary and middle schools - and only 8 ounces in elementary and 10 ounces in middle schools. High schools will have a little more leeway to stock as much as 12-ounce containers of juice, milk and sports drinks - but half the products must be low- or no-calorie.
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