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By Jordan Bartel | December 30, 2013
One of the best parts of New Year's Eve (other than preparing for a fresh start) is the parties. You must go. To maybe a few. And you must be prepared for what you'll encounter. Or, more specifically, who you'll encounter. It's not an exact science, but we've determined in our years of New Year's Eve party anthropological analyses that there are seven distinct species native to the New Year's Eve party. Proceed with caution. The over-anxious, fireworks-obsessed host How to spot them: He/she is the one dressed very nicely, hovering over hors d'oeuvres, looking at the clock frantically as though there's some way (some way!
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SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Members of the Bluford Drew Jemison Rockets baseball team gathered in a group on the third-base line of Utz Twardowicz Field on Tuesday afternoon. The day was already special. The weather was gorgeous, they were playing baseball and knew they had raised enough money to keep their previously struggling program afloat. But all of a sudden, their day got even better. Orioles center fielder Adam Jones walked through the third-base gate, waved and strolled down the base path toward the players, many of whose mouths hung open in shock.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Keven Moldenhauer doesn't have a problem with any other sports. In fact, he coached high school basketball for 10 years and is a fan of baseball and football. But for Moldenhauer, a Forest Hill native and Salisbury graduate, nothing quite compares to the excitement of ultimate. "In baseball, you're just waiting for that big play, maybe a home run or a double play. And in football, you're waiting for a big catch," Moldenhauer said. "In ultimate, those type of plays happen all the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | December 30, 2013
One of the best parts of New Year's Eve (other than preparing for a fresh start) is the parties. You must go. To maybe a few. And you must be prepared for what you'll encounter. Or, more specifically, who you'll encounter. It's not an exact science, but we've determined in our years of New Year's Eve party anthropological analyses that there are seven distinct species native to the New Year's Eve party. Proceed with caution. The over-anxious, fireworks-obsessed host How to spot them: He/she is the one dressed very nicely, hovering over hors d'oeuvres, looking at the clock frantically as though there's some way (some way!
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 22, 2011
After stringing together five straight scoreless appearances and picking up his first save of 2011 in the Indians series, Michael Gonzalez allowed three runs in Monday's 15-10 loss to the Red Sox. To make matters worse, the Orioles reliever was picked for this week's "Not Top 10" segment on SportsCenter after falling off the mound Monday while throwing a pitch. Poor Gonzalez. The guy just can't win. He is the Orioles' Charlie Brown.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | July 2, 1994
The group backing the proposed Sports Center USA complex on Baltimore's Inner Harbor said it has cleared one of its highest hurdles: finding financing for the project's development and construction.Funding for the center, which would have sports-related virtual-reality machines, motion simulators, video highlights booths and big-screen movies, "has been secured to the point where the entire project is ready to be developed, once we finalize details," said Lynda O'Dea, president of development for Sports Center USA Inc.She declined to reveal the financiers' identities or the deal's structure.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | April 29, 1996
To the serious sports fan, there may be no more hallowed program than ESPN's "SportsCenter," the evening news of athletics. The "da-da-da, da-da-da" of its theme song is as familiar as the national anthem, and its anchors are known worldwide.Yet, for all the programs under the ESPN umbrella, "SportsCenter" has been the show that received the least publicity."I think people have sort of taken us for granted. It [SportsCenter] is always there," anchor Dan Patrick said during a recent conference call.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
The Strand Theatre, which has stood empty for six years in the heart of the Dundalk Historic District, is getting a new life.After six decades of providing cinema entertainment, the theater will now become an indoor sports center, much to the relief of a community that had fretted over the building's future.The 9,105-square-foot theater will have six batting cages, basketball hoops, an arcade, a concession stand and a nine-hole miniature golf course on its second-floor balcony. It will be developed by America's Pastime, which opened a similar center in April in South Baltimore's historic McHenry Theatre.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 10, 1992
It's been a long, long time since sound of blessed bedlam filled the McHenry Theatre's auditorium.The noise and fun returned to South Baltimore's favorite movie house last weekend, when the long-shuttered plaster palace reopened as a sports center called America's Pastime.The 1917 playhouse now has six indoor batting cages with automatic pitching machines, video games, pool tables, Skee-Ball, air hockey, a restaurant and baseball collectible store. The building is in the 1000 block of Light St., near the Cross Street Market.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
Lynda O'Dea made her reputation in sports marketing as the "Queen of the Sports Palaces" at Maryland's thoroughbred racetracks and for throwing elaborate and fun parties at the state's big horse races.She has had waiters on roller skates and dinner for 1,000 people on a Norweigian cruise ship. And she has used Baltimore backdrops from the Dundalk Marine Terminal to the Peabody Conservatory as props for her racetrack entertaining.But since the death of her mentor and companion, Frank De Francis, three years ago, she has kept a low profile at the track, serving mostly as a social consultant, coordinating such events as the tented village in the infield for the Preakness and Maryland Million and activities for the International Turf Festival.
SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Keven Moldenhauer doesn't have a problem with any other sports. In fact, he coached high school basketball for 10 years and is a fan of baseball and football. But for Moldenhauer, a Forest Hill native and Salisbury graduate, nothing quite compares to the excitement of ultimate. "In baseball, you're just waiting for that big play, maybe a home run or a double play. And in football, you're waiting for a big catch," Moldenhauer said. "In ultimate, those type of plays happen all the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
The sorry tableau of two replacement referees standing side by side in the end zone making opposite calls on a controversial play at the end of ESPN's "Monday Night Football" led to the largest audience on record for the post-game SportsCenter show. That image of those two hopeless referees making the opposite call on a contested reception will long serve as the symbol of what has happened to the game in this labor dispute between the real referees and owners. But the ratings for the games, compromised as they might be by utterly inept officiating, just keep going up. Sunday's contest between the Ravens and the New England Patriots was seen by 21.3 million viewers.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 22, 2011
After stringing together five straight scoreless appearances and picking up his first save of 2011 in the Indians series, Michael Gonzalez allowed three runs in Monday's 15-10 loss to the Red Sox. To make matters worse, the Orioles reliever was picked for this week's "Not Top 10" segment on SportsCenter after falling off the mound Monday while throwing a pitch. Poor Gonzalez. The guy just can't win. He is the Orioles' Charlie Brown.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 13, 2011
I’ve got good news for fans holding out hope that Sergio Kindle will suit up for the Ravens in 2011 (and beyond): The second-year linebacker told The San Antonio Express-News he was cleared to resume playing football in March and he already has visions of watching himself on “SportsCenter” highlights dancing through his head. “First and foremost, we have to wait for the lockout,” said Kindle, who missed the entire 2010 season with a fractured skull he suffered when he fell down a flight of stairs the week before training camp.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | September 2, 2005
A FOOLISH consistency, the saying goes, is the hobgoblin of little minds. How much you care about seeing the same anchors doing SportsCenter at set times will probably determine whether you believe that hobgoblin has taken up residence in ESPN's offices. The network announced this week it is setting up consistent anchor teams, starting Monday. During the week, Dan Patrick and Fred Hickman will be at 6 p.m., John Anderson and Steve Levy at 11 p.m. and Scott Van Pelt and Neil Everett at 1 a.m. The latter two teams will switch spots each month.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 15, 2005
SPILLING OUT the notebook and offering up small pieces of my mind (which is about all I can afford to give up): On Sunday, ESPN begins its "SportsCenter Across America" summer tour, in which various anchors fan out across the country, appearing at sporting events in all 50 states on 50 consecutive days. We'll get plenty of baseball drop-ins - from the majors to minors to youth league - and a few more off-the-beaten-track appearances, such as from skydiving, freestyle Frisbee and pie-eating events.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | January 17, 1996
A seemingly innocuous four-minute piece on the reformation of former Dallas linebacker Thomas "Hollywood" Henderson airing on Monday's 6:30 p.m. and overnight "SportsCenters" may have dangerous repercussions.It was a thought-provoking story on how the gifted defender on the Cowboys teams of the 1970s has bounced back from acocaine addiction, but more interesting is where the piece came from.The story was reported and produced by NFL Films, a biased source, and raises questions about how closely intertwined the leagues and the networks should be.In many ways, the line between the networks and the leagues they cover has been blurred, if not directly crossed.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | September 14, 1999
BRISTOL, Conn. -- From his perch at the "SportsCenter" desk, Dan Patrick is the cool, calm, authoritative anchor personified, a guy who looks not to have a care in the world.And, in a certain sense, he really doesn't have a concern. Patrick, probably the lead "SportsCenter" anchor as the core of the signature 11 p.m. show, has had his appearances trimmed to twice a week -- at his own request.In addition, ESPN officials have also created a daily radio talk show for Patrick, again at his request, to take his career in a different direction after 10 1/2 years here.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 1, 2003
John and Darlene Keister of Woodbine opened an indoor sports center in Howard County because they were tired of driving their daughter, Candace, to Westminster for soccer practice. "That's a long drive when it's bad weather," Darlene Keister said. Candace, 11, had been playing soccer in a local Recreation and Parks program. When the fall season ended, several of the girls wanted to continue playing through the winter months. John Keister, who was also the team's coach, was happy to continue his work with the team, but the closest indoor facility he could find was in Carroll County.
SPORTS
By John Jeansonne and John Jeansonne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2002
BRISTOL, Conn. - ESPN's SportsCenter, a genuine slice of Americana, will air its 25,000th edition Sunday, a run of success possibly reinforcing the notion that we are not a profound people. Aside from stressing our preoccupation with pleasing 18- to 34-year-old males, though, the occasion is a timely example of the many ironies in the life and influence of John A. Walsh, the man who created and shaped SportsCenter, as well as virtually every aspect of ESPN's news operation. He is widely proclaimed a visionary in the most visual media, his editorial moves having affected competitive giants from Sports Illustrated to television cable rivals, yet his eyesight is so poor he has no driver's license.
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