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By Chris Korman | December 17, 2012
Every now and then we'll offer a lunch-time gathering of news and links related to sports business: Let's start first with what is easily the most important sports business story you'll read this year. Patrick Hruby -- a rare writer equally adept at humor and narrative and analysis -- turned his attention to our government's penchant for giving handouts to sports owners for Sports on Earth . His point being that reducing these costs would go some of the way toward edging the country away from the fiscal cliff you may have heard about.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
At a time of amped-up competitions like cage matches and extreme obstacle-course races, there's something downright retro about a good old-fashioned arm-wrestle. A couple of combatants, usually at a bar, usually egged on by onlookers, plant their elbows, grasp hands and try to force each other's arms down. What could be simpler, sweatier and thus more suited to that summer's-end tradition, the Maryland State Fair? "It's mano a mano," said Steve Simons, who for the past five years has hosted an arm-wrestling tournament at the fair, which began Friday.
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EXPLORE
September 29, 2011
Shame on the Catonsville Times for essentially running a story for the i9 flag football league ("New flag football league puts the fun in fundamentals," Sept. 21). Make no mistake, i9 is a for-profit business. The Times was misguided to devote a full page advertisement to this organization. Catonsville already has dozens of sports programs, offered to the children of the community under the Baltimore County Parks and Recreation umbrella. These are run 100 percent by volunteers, who are completely focused on the children - not turning a profit.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Childs Walker took a look at the mysterious process used to pick the location of the Major League All-Star Game for Tuesday's paper. It's clear why the Orioles -- and those working in tourism and sports marketing in the city -- covet the chance to host the game in 2016. The last time it was here, in 1993, the game delivered an economic impact of $31.4 million , according to city estimates. In 2013 dollars, that's $50 million. (For comparison's sake, the Grand Prix of Baltimore had an economic impact of about $47 million two years ago and $42 million in 2012 .)
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | April 9, 1992
Even if players surprise everyone and end their strike today, the National Hockey League still will have more than its share of problems on and off the ice.The more likely scenario is that the season will end today, with the playoffs canceled because the players union and owners remain deadlocked.When the labor strife is finally settled, what does the future hold? The sport seems to have the fundamentals of a winning business: The action on the ice is fast, the teams are established and the sport is widely played, at least in northern regions.
NEWS
By Mitch Albom | December 30, 2009
O nce upon a time, we looked away. That's how it used to be in the sports writing business. If Babe Ruth was drunk at night but hit a home run during the day, only the home run was reported. That attitude has changed. Over the years, the wink-and-nod agreement between sports heroes and the men who lionized them withered away. The behavior got worse (gambling, drugs, steroids) and the journalism got more pointed. Now comes news that TMZ, the powerful gossip Internet and TV organization, is sharpening its fangs for a bite into the sports business - and this could take the ugliness, as athletes like to say, to whole new level.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
At a time of amped-up competitions like cage matches and extreme obstacle-course races, there's something downright retro about a good old-fashioned arm-wrestle. A couple of combatants, usually at a bar, usually egged on by onlookers, plant their elbows, grasp hands and try to force each other's arms down. What could be simpler, sweatier and thus more suited to that summer's-end tradition, the Maryland State Fair? "It's mano a mano," said Steve Simons, who for the past five years has hosted an arm-wrestling tournament at the fair, which began Friday.
NEWS
September 18, 2005
Our sports section will be as action-packed as the games we cover.We'll take you inside the locker rooms and expand your knowledge of issues facing our local pro, college and high school teams. DAILY Sports New look for scores and stats Redesigned Kickoff on Page 2 New, theme pages focusing on a variety of sports and recreation. MONDAY GAMEDAY Complete Ravens coverage, report card and stats Weekly NFL wrapup of weekend games AFC NFC standings and stats. WEDNESDAY VARSITY Regional school sports Athletes of the week, Statistical leaders Multiple editions, including Baltimore and five metro area counties.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 4, 2012
Every now and then we'll offer a lunch-time gathering of news and links related to sports business: Jack Lambert of the Baltimore Business Journal wrote last week that the Ravens quietly unveiled a $250,000 makeover of the general concession stand near Section 101 during the team's Nov. 11 game with the Raiders. The new stand, which allows consumers to see food being prepared, is a prototype that could be used as the team seeks to update the first level of the 14-year-old stadium, according to the story.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Sports business lunch offers quick look at stories in Baltimore and across the country. From The Sun: Under Armour's newest football commercial has former Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis' fingerprints all over it. I wrote about the spot for today's paper , and you can get a look at it there. Lewis helped the creative team solidify the narrative. CEO and founder Kevin Plank came up with the original idea for an urban football feel after seeing kids walking through Baltimore carrying their equipment.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Sports business lunch is a collection of business stories from Baltimore and the rest of the country. From The Sun: Lacrosse's growth has been astounding. Deadspin best illustrated this with a map showing the spread of the college game over the last decade . (The site used data from The Growth Blog, another fascinating resource for tracking the way lacrosse has moved across the country.) US Lacrosse, tucked in a building next to Homewood Field - you've likely seen the statue of Native Americans out front playing the game - has driven and managed that growth.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
Sports business lunch offers quick look at stories in Baltimore and across the country. From The Sun: Under Armour's newest football commercial has former Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis' fingerprints all over it. I wrote about the spot for today's paper , and you can get a look at it there. Lewis helped the creative team solidify the narrative. CEO and founder Kevin Plank came up with the original idea for an urban football feel after seeing kids walking through Baltimore carrying their equipment.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 23, 2013
An occasional look at sports business stories from across the country ... Brendon Ayanbadejo knows there is no better time to speak than in the lead up to the Super Bowl. Thousands of reporters from every sort of outlet will be in New Orleans to cover the spectacle, and a good number of them will look to seize on something beyond the battle of the brothers Harbaugh, or Ray Lewis' last stand. How about gay marriage? Ayanbadejo is a long-time and unabashed advocate for gay rights . That's an unusual thing for a pro athlete to be in the most normal of times.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 17, 2012
Every now and then we'll offer a lunch-time gathering of news and links related to sports business: Let's start first with what is easily the most important sports business story you'll read this year. Patrick Hruby -- a rare writer equally adept at humor and narrative and analysis -- turned his attention to our government's penchant for giving handouts to sports owners for Sports on Earth . His point being that reducing these costs would go some of the way toward edging the country away from the fiscal cliff you may have heard about.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 4, 2012
Every now and then we'll offer a lunch-time gathering of news and links related to sports business: Jack Lambert of the Baltimore Business Journal wrote last week that the Ravens quietly unveiled a $250,000 makeover of the general concession stand near Section 101 during the team's Nov. 11 game with the Raiders. The new stand, which allows consumers to see food being prepared, is a prototype that could be used as the team seeks to update the first level of the 14-year-old stadium, according to the story.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 3, 2012
Alan Rifkin, outside counsel for the Orioles and owner Peter Angelos, said Monday that reports of a possible MASN sale are innacurate. "There has been no contact," he said. "There has been no offer. There has been no discussion of it. MASN is not for sale. " According to John Ourand of the Sports Business Journal, Fox and Comcast have had negotiations with Peter Angelos about acquiring his majority share of the television network and the rights to both Orioles and Nationals games.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 23, 2013
An occasional look at sports business stories from across the country ... Brendon Ayanbadejo knows there is no better time to speak than in the lead up to the Super Bowl. Thousands of reporters from every sort of outlet will be in New Orleans to cover the spectacle, and a good number of them will look to seize on something beyond the battle of the brothers Harbaugh, or Ray Lewis' last stand. How about gay marriage? Ayanbadejo is a long-time and unabashed advocate for gay rights . That's an unusual thing for a pro athlete to be in the most normal of times.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Childs Walker took a look at the mysterious process used to pick the location of the Major League All-Star Game for Tuesday's paper. It's clear why the Orioles -- and those working in tourism and sports marketing in the city -- covet the chance to host the game in 2016. The last time it was here, in 1993, the game delivered an economic impact of $31.4 million , according to city estimates. In 2013 dollars, that's $50 million. (For comparison's sake, the Grand Prix of Baltimore had an economic impact of about $47 million two years ago and $42 million in 2012 .)
EXPLORE
September 29, 2011
Shame on the Catonsville Times for essentially running a story for the i9 flag football league ("New flag football league puts the fun in fundamentals," Sept. 21). Make no mistake, i9 is a for-profit business. The Times was misguided to devote a full page advertisement to this organization. Catonsville already has dozens of sports programs, offered to the children of the community under the Baltimore County Parks and Recreation umbrella. These are run 100 percent by volunteers, who are completely focused on the children - not turning a profit.
NEWS
By Mitch Albom | December 30, 2009
O nce upon a time, we looked away. That's how it used to be in the sports writing business. If Babe Ruth was drunk at night but hit a home run during the day, only the home run was reported. That attitude has changed. Over the years, the wink-and-nod agreement between sports heroes and the men who lionized them withered away. The behavior got worse (gambling, drugs, steroids) and the journalism got more pointed. Now comes news that TMZ, the powerful gossip Internet and TV organization, is sharpening its fangs for a bite into the sports business - and this could take the ugliness, as athletes like to say, to whole new level.
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