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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 17, 1999
Hurricane Floyd forced the postponement of numerous sporting events scheduled for yesterday and today throughout the region.Horse racing from Virginia to New York was canceled yesterday and at least one track will not run today.The Orioles-Athletics games for Wednesday and yesterday were both postponed.The first round of the PGA B.C. Open in Endicott, N.Y., was postponed early in the first round, with organizers still hoping to get in the full four rounds through Sunday.Some golfers managed to tee off before the rain began, but they soon had to head for the clubhouse.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Heubeck | June 2, 2014
Parents of child athletes, take this quiz: Does your child receive lessons from a professional, paid coach in addition to a team coach? Do you routinely travel more than 30 minutes, one way, to your child's sporting events? Does your child's sport schedule conflict with other family commitments? If you answered yes to any of the questions above, chances are your family has also been ensnared in the sport-centric web that's now so much a part of childhood. I know mine has. It's tough to pinpoint how it happens or who is to blame.
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NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Next month, 1,000 young swimmers will converge on Baltimore. Normally, that wouldn't raise too many eyebrows. But with the Baltimore-Washington region chasing the 2012 Summer Olympic Games, the meet suddenly has taken on new importance."
NEWS
By Marty Conway | June 2, 2014
The recent three-day 2014 NCAA Men's Lacrosse championship event at M&T Stadium drew the lowest attendance yet - 78,234 - since Baltimore introduced it to NFL stadiums in 2003. And the Baltimore Ravens, the main stadium tenant, did not submit a bid to host the event in 2015 through 2018 in part because of potential parking lot conflicts during simultaneous Orioles games. How does this happen with a sporting event and geographic region, that seem to be so right for one another? With the sport's national governing body, US Lacrosse, here, along with the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame,  there is little doubt about the depth of both participation and support for the sport locally, and within 100 miles from Baltimore.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
WESTMINSTER - Looking for a different gift idea? The American Heart Association is selling the Entertainment '91 books for $35.The books include discount coupons for restaurants, movies, sporting events, dry cleaning, film developing, hotels and more.To purchase books, call 876-1029 or stop by the AHA office at 280 E.Main St.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | September 22, 1998
A few area responses to the release of President Clinton's grand jury testimony:Virginia Cooper, 80, Lauraville homemaker: "I really think they've overplayed everything. They've just overdone it. We've had other presidents who've had affairs and things."Bonnie Downing, marketing manager of ESPN Zone, the sports theme restaurant in Baltimore's Inner Harbor: "Mostly ourscreens are tuned to sporting events. People come in here to watch sports. ... Personally, I'm curious. When I go home, I'll check it out then."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 30, 2008
Editor's note: Sports columnist Peter Schmuck begins a new blog today. He'll hit on a variety of topics, but the focus will be Orioles and Ravens. This is an excerpt from his first post. For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog. The first thing I'd like to do before I unlink my tether from the journalistic mother ship and float off into the blogosphere is to separate fact from fiction with a quick game of true or false: True or false: Peter Schmuck has relocated into cyberspace and will no longer be the bright, insightful and wildly popular columnist we've come to love in the print edition of The Sun. False.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | October 5, 2007
Fans at two Howard County high schools are being told to leave all beverages at home when they attend athletic events in an effort to combat what one school official called an alarming level of drinking among students. Administrators at Wilde Lake High School in Columbia and Centennial High School in Ellicott City separately instituted the ban in the past two weeks. The edicts, which apply to both students and adults, allows fans to possess only beverages that have been purchased from concession stands.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1999
Annapolis could be the site of Olympic sailing races in 13 years if the Washington Baltimore 2012 Coalition succeeds in bringing the international games to the region.Clarence T. Bishop, senior vice president of the coalition, spoke to a small group from the Annapolis and Anne Arundel Chamber of Commerce yesterday, urging business leaders to support the region's Olympic bid."We must show the [U.S. Olympic Committee] that the community is behind this effort," Bishop said. "The Olympics is the single biggest economic development opportunity in the world.
NEWS
By John Fritze | May 3, 2008
Mayor Sheila Dixon joined officials from Pimilico Race Course yesterday to announce the calendar of events leading up to the Preakness on May 17 - including the annual parade in downtown Baltimore and several live concerts. "We attract not only people from all over the country to come here but also residents of Baltimore," Dixon said at the Maryland Jockey Club. "People come to the city, and they realize how wonderful our city is." The Crawdaddies will play at Belevedere Square starting at 6 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
Thirty years ago last month, the Baltimore Colts left town, and the loss of the beloved NFL franchise was a stunning blow not only to football fans but to the city's identify. Nine years later, Baltimore's image as a sports town suffered another big hit when, after getting passed over for an expansion franchise, then-NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue famously suggested a museum be purchased for the city instead. The beauty of that "Let them eat fossils and Pre-Columbian art" put-down was that it not only implied that an NFL team would never be coming to Baltimore but that the city had a cultural deficit, too. Whatever chip on the shoulder Baltimore had from the day of the Mayflower moving vans suddenly got a lot heavier.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Water? Check. Playbook? Check. AED? Check. When Baltimore area middle school coaches take their teams to a sporting event, they are increasingly adding some new equipment to the list of necessary supplies: automated external defibrillators. The devices are perhaps most frequently associated with helping people middle-aged and older in cardiac emergencies, but statistics show that sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death and is a major concern for young athletes, too. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, about 3,000 young people die every year from cardiac arrest.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Gary Jobson is not only a Hall of Fame sailor. He is also something of a history buff when it comes to a sport that has been a big part of his life since childhood. Which is why Jobson, of Annapolis, was happy to witness this year's America's Cup competition in San Francisco Bay up close, as someone who could both enjoy the event and appreciate its historical context. For those who were busy following the Ravens, Orioles or even Maryland, Oracle Team USA came back from the largest deficit in the competition's history to win and retain the cup. Trailing 8-1 to Emirates Team New Zealand, Oracle took the last eight races to win the 17-race competition and put Jimmy Spithill, the Australian skipper who headed Oracle's crew, in the company of the sport's legendary figures.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
As tens of thousands of Baltimore sports fans packed downtown to watch country music star Keith Urban kick off the NFL season and the Orioles' win at home, some of the lingering exasperation that the Ravens were playing out of town faded away. "It was frustrating that the Orioles couldn't move their game," said Kevin Williams, who was celebrating his 53rd birthday at the harbor with friends. "But this is the next best thing. And it's free, you know. " Over at Camden Yards, some Orioles fans were ducking out early to catch the Ravens on TV. But manager Buck Showalter didn't seem to mind.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Ticketmaster and other ticket sellers could add unlimited fees to the price of admission for concerts and sporting events under legislation approved by a key City Council committee on Tuesday. The committee gutted a bill that sought to limit "convenience" fees for processing and other services. The fees are sometimes split by the ticket sellers and the venues hosting the events. The decision won praise from ticket sellers and their venue clients — who packed the City Council chambers with lawyers and lobbyists — but criticism from a consumer rights group that advocated for lower fees.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Four members of the Harlem Globetrotters will take turns dribbling and spinning basketballs during a 7.7 mile walk from the Inner Harbor to Towson University's new arena Monday morning. The Globetrotters -- who, according to a Reuters report, are up for sale -- will be the first sports team to play in the new 5,200-seat arena when they open a three-game set on Wednesday night at 7 p.m. Eric Nemeth, the 87-year-old organization's senior director of event publicity, said the team -- which makes an annual stop at 1st Mariner Arena around Christmas -- wanted to mark the opening of the arena with a unique event.
NEWS
June 9, 2013
It should be crystal clear that the city of Baltimore and the state of Maryland should ratchet up the discussion over replacing the 1stt Mariner Arena, a venue that has clearly outlived its usefulness. An observation made by Mark Turgeon, head basketball coach at the University of Maryland College Park, pointed out the problem: In discussing his willingness to foster stronger ties with the Baltimore region, Mr. Turgeon said his major obstacle was 1st Mariner. "We tried, and I don't see our playing up here in the foreseeable future," he said.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,HARTFORD COURANT | August 26, 2005
Except for the lack of a swimsuit issue, Geezerjock - a new magazine targeting older athletes - could be called Sports Illustrated for Seniors. The slick publication, launched this year, includes a similar format of feature stories, event coverage, profiles and eye-catching photography as SI - with one major difference. All of Geezerjock's content is focused on Masters' level competitors and competitions. "Masters" is commonly used to refer to sporting events for men and women amateur athletes 40 or 50 and above.
NEWS
June 9, 2013
It should be crystal clear that the city of Baltimore and the state of Maryland should ratchet up the discussion over replacing the 1stt Mariner Arena, a venue that has clearly outlived its usefulness. An observation made by Mark Turgeon, head basketball coach at the University of Maryland College Park, pointed out the problem: In discussing his willingness to foster stronger ties with the Baltimore region, Mr. Turgeon said his major obstacle was 1st Mariner. "We tried, and I don't see our playing up here in the foreseeable future," he said.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
A visibly increased police presence greeted Orioles fans Tuesday as they ventured to Camden Yards for Baltimore's first major sporting event since the previous day's deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon. Nonetheless, fans, players and team officials spoke defiantly of refusing to give up day-to-day pleasures because of the specter of terror. "There are so many places where someone could do so many things that you can't worry about everything," said Kevin Ridgely of Severna Park, who attended the game with his 19-year-old son, Will.
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