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By LONNY WEAVER | October 25, 1992
Five years ago, I sat in on a sales pitch by the then-fledgling National Sporting Clays Association while attending that year's Outdoor Writers Association of America Conference in Harrisburg, Pa.As I recall, the only courses in the country were found in Texas at the time, though sporting clays had been established as a popular sport throughout Great Britain and Europe since the turn of the century.Anyway, I listened to the pitch, then joined a couple dozen writers in shooting a rough introductory course set up jointly by the NSCA, Winchester and Remington.
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By Bill Heavey and Bill Heavey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
My instructor, Wes Russum, pushes a button, and an orange clay disk sails away from the spring-loaded contraption at our feet. It spins up into the sky, floating like a tiny Frisbee, then stalls and falls to the ground, where it shatters noiselessly. It's a straightaway bird, the easiest shot in the game. Rounds are 50 and 100 birds, $18 and $35, respectively. Guns for rent. Information Here are Web sites to check for more information about sporting clays: * National Sporting Clays Association; www.nssa-nsca.
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SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | February 21, 1993
Soon the weather will be moderating and many area sportsmen will be thinking about shooting a round or two of sporting clays.Sporting clays is the fastest-growing target-hooting sport in the country, and a number of fine courses can now be found close to this area.A few that come to mind are Prince George's County Trap & Skeet Center (formerly known as the Beretta Course) in Glendale, The Isaac Walton course near Bethesda and Foxy Pheasant Hunting Preserve in Charles Town, W.Va.I'm far from being an expert clays shooter, but I have managed to pick up a trick or two either on my own or by hanging around shot-gunners much more accomplished than myself.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
Picture, if you will, this scene: A businessman places a chair outside his office door and practices pitchin' a lure under it while keeping an eye on the hum and drum of commerce.It could be at any small business in any small town in the country where bass fishing is king, right?Wrong.Zimbabwe. Harare, Zimbabwe, to be exact.And pitchin' a lure beneath a chair is how Gerry Jooste practiced his technique for the BASS Masters Classic that ended yesterday on Lake Logan Martin near Birmingham, Ala.Jooste, a 39-year-old boatbuilder, had a problem, you see.While there are big bass in Zimbabwe thanks to a stocking program started by the Bass Anglers Sportsmans Society in 1982, there is a dearth of docks and piers on the bass waters of that African country.
TRAVEL
By Bill Heavey and Bill Heavey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2000
My instructor, Wes Russum, pushes a button, and an orange clay disk sails away from the spring-loaded contraption at our feet. It spins up into the sky, floating like a tiny Frisbee, then stalls and falls to the ground, where it shatters noiselessly. It's a straightaway bird, the easiest shot in the game. Rounds are 50 and 100 birds, $18 and $35, respectively. Guns for rent. Information Here are Web sites to check for more information about sporting clays: * National Sporting Clays Association; www.nssa-nsca.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | July 17, 1994
I recently spent an enjoyable day shooting sporting clays with some friends at a popular course in York, Pa. Sporting clays is a clay target game conducted on specially designed courses and the closest thing to actual field hunting that you will find. Depending on the course design, a typical round features 50 to 100 targets simulating a great variety of shots actually encountered by the upland game or waterfowl hunter.Though this shotgun game has been popular throughout Europe for close to a century, it never reached our shores until 1984.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | May 12, 1991
Slammer bluefish are making their best run in several years, and although the 12- to 18-pound fish have not schooled up, they are making for great sport from the Middle Grounds off Point Lookout up to the Bay Bridge area.What that means for avid bluefish anglers is a chance to win money or prizes in the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's eighth annual Big Money Bluefish Tournament Saturday and next Sunday.The tournament is open to boats whose captains are members '' of the MSSA by the last skippers meeting Thursday.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | January 28, 1992
At mid-morning Sunday, a rabbit skittered across a snowy field in Pasadena, followed shortly by another, perhaps 10 yards out, but 18 yards on the diagonal. Two quick shots, and the rabbits broke apart in pieces.The rabbits were clay targets, and the field was a new sporting clays range at Stoney Creek Hunting and Fishing Association in Pasadena."Those rabbits are a little slow from the snow -- otherwise you never would have got two," one of a half-dozen club members gathered behind the shooter's cage said and laughed.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
Picture, if you will, this scene: A businessman places a chair outside his office door and practices pitchin' a lure under it while keeping an eye on the hum and drum of commerce.It could be at any small business in any small town in the country where bass fishing is king, right?Wrong.Zimbabwe. Harare, Zimbabwe, to be exact.And pitchin' a lure beneath a chair is how Gerry Jooste practiced his technique for the BASS Masters Classic that ended yesterday on Lake Logan Martin near Birmingham, Ala.Jooste, a 39-year-old boatbuilder, had a problem, you see.While there are big bass in Zimbabwe thanks to a stocking program started by the Bass Anglers Sportsmans Society in 1982, there is a dearth of docks and piers on the bass waters of that African country.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | August 1, 1993
Exactly one month from today this year's dove season will kick off. This means it is time to start thinking doves.Doves are quite possibly the hardest easy shooting a hunter is apt to encounter. Sure, they're fast and can change directions on the surface of a dime, but for the most part the gunner has a wide open shot at a bird that he probably saw sailing in his direction for the last mile or so. You will miss this bird because you have no concept of distance, haven't touched your shotgun since last fall, placed yourself so that the sun is squarely in your eyes, or a hundred other reasons.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | July 17, 1994
I recently spent an enjoyable day shooting sporting clays with some friends at a popular course in York, Pa. Sporting clays is a clay target game conducted on specially designed courses and the closest thing to actual field hunting that you will find. Depending on the course design, a typical round features 50 to 100 targets simulating a great variety of shots actually encountered by the upland game or waterfowl hunter.Though this shotgun game has been popular throughout Europe for close to a century, it never reached our shores until 1984.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | August 1, 1993
Exactly one month from today this year's dove season will kick off. This means it is time to start thinking doves.Doves are quite possibly the hardest easy shooting a hunter is apt to encounter. Sure, they're fast and can change directions on the surface of a dime, but for the most part the gunner has a wide open shot at a bird that he probably saw sailing in his direction for the last mile or so. You will miss this bird because you have no concept of distance, haven't touched your shotgun since last fall, placed yourself so that the sun is squarely in your eyes, or a hundred other reasons.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | July 4, 1993
The next time you drive up to Carlisle, Pa., to enjoy some of the nation's most famous trout streams, throw your shotgun in the trunk along with a couple boxes of shells and drop by the Carlisle Fish & Game Association's sporting clays course.Sporting clays is shot-gunning's answer to golf and one of the fastest-growing sports in the country. The game, which has been popular in Europe for about 100 years, simulates hunting situations. No two courses are the same.The only problem with the game in our area is one of limited course sites.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | February 21, 1993
Soon the weather will be moderating and many area sportsmen will be thinking about shooting a round or two of sporting clays.Sporting clays is the fastest-growing target-hooting sport in the country, and a number of fine courses can now be found close to this area.A few that come to mind are Prince George's County Trap & Skeet Center (formerly known as the Beretta Course) in Glendale, The Isaac Walton course near Bethesda and Foxy Pheasant Hunting Preserve in Charles Town, W.Va.I'm far from being an expert clays shooter, but I have managed to pick up a trick or two either on my own or by hanging around shot-gunners much more accomplished than myself.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | October 25, 1992
Five years ago, I sat in on a sales pitch by the then-fledgling National Sporting Clays Association while attending that year's Outdoor Writers Association of America Conference in Harrisburg, Pa.As I recall, the only courses in the country were found in Texas at the time, though sporting clays had been established as a popular sport throughout Great Britain and Europe since the turn of the century.Anyway, I listened to the pitch, then joined a couple dozen writers in shooting a rough introductory course set up jointly by the NSCA, Winchester and Remington.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker's | September 20, 1992
SHOWSThursday-Sept. 27: Sunfest Boat Show at Shantytown Village in West Ocean City. Show opens daily at noon. No admission. More than 100 boats on display. For more information, call (410)-213-1121.Thursday-Sept. 27: Penn's Landing in-the-water boat show, Penn's Landing Boat Basin in Philadelphia. For more information, call (215) 449-9910.Oct. 3-4: Camrod Hunting Club gun and knife show at the Timonium Fairgrounds. Hundreds of trade tables featuring shot guns, rifles, ammunition, pistols, gun parts, knives, swords, books, hunting supplies and antiques.
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