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NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2003
I ADMIT to not being a big fan of sport utility vehicles; some readers have picked up on that bias. Brad Closs e-mailed me recently in defense of SUVs. "While it is currently `in' to bash SUVs because they take up a lot of space, are hard to see around and use too much gas, there is an interesting comparison to be made between the most popular SUVs and minivans," he said. He compares the vehicles' dimensions, noting that "the most popular minivan (the Chrysler/Dodge Grand Caravan)" is almost a foot longer and over a half foot wider than the Ford Explorer, according to Consumer Reports' Annual Auto Issue.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
A single-vehicle crash took the life of a man in Westminster after his SUV left a roadway and crashed into trees, according to Maryland State Police. Luis Alberto Martinez Gomez, for whom no age was provided, was driving a Mercury Mountaineer on Sunday morning southward on Stone Road, just north of Halter Road, and failed to negotiate a curve. The vehicle struck two pine trees, a statement from the state police's Westminster barrack said. Gomez, who lived on Black Locust Lane, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 1997
DETROIT -- Over the past quarter-century, affluent families have become increasingly able to insulate themselves from the rest of society. Nearly 4 million Americans live in gated communities. Private schools have become wildly popular. Even the humble sport of walking has changed, as treadmills at chic health spas supplant trails in public parks.And then there are the Jeeps.As the distance -- physical and financial -- between rich and poor grows, so does the appeal of the sport utility vehicle.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | May 28, 2008
Shares of General Motors Corp. fell yesterday to their lowest value since 1982 after Citigroup Inc. cut its rating on the world's largest automaker to "hold" from "buy," noting that he company faces "cash-burn risks" as the costs of raw materials rise. "Auto fundamentals are poised to deteriorate beyond 2008," Citigroup analysts wrote in a note. GM's decline extended a slide that has reached 30 percent this year. The shares dropped 18 cents, or 1 percent, to $17.42 in trading on the New York Stock Exchange, the lowest price since October 1982.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 1998
DETROIT -- As sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks become bigger and more common, their height and high-mounted headlights are making visibility on the road more difficult for other drivers, particularly at night. Federal regulators are growing concerned.The normal headlights of an oncoming full-size sport utility vehicle or pickup truck can create so much glare that they appear to car drivers as bright as high beams. When such a big vehicle follows a car at night, the car's rear-view mirror and side mirrors reflect very bright glare.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2000
Oh, the anti-SUV crowd, they're having a field day with this one, aren't they? Let's face it: They've always hated us. They see us lumbering down the highway in our rolling steel-encased fortresses, burning 14 barrels of OPEC crude on a five-minute trip to the 7-Eleven, sitting high above the fray in our leather club seats and gazing down at the little people in their Honda Civics and Geo Prisms and Toyota Corollas, and it just drives them nuts....
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
IT IS ONE OF THE MORE ironic signs of our times -- a four-wheel drive, a pickup or a minivan sporting a bumper sticker that says "Save The Bay" or a license plate proclaiming "Treasure the Chesapeake."It's a common enough sight, as all have gotten very popular.The pickups, vans and "sport utility vehicles" like Jeeps, Suburbans and Explorers have burgeoned from 20 million in the 1970s to 65 million nationwide. They account for half of all passenger vehicles sold each year.Membership in environmental groups such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (slogan, Save The Bay)
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 29, 1998
The County Commissioners yesterday raised tipping fees at the Hoods Mill Landfill, off Hoods Mill Road near the Howard County border.Effective July 1, tipping fees will be $6 for cars, $7 for sport utility vehicles and $10 for pick-up trucks.Cars are now charged $4 and pick-up trucks are charged $6. The county does not have a separate charge for sport utility vehicles.J. Michael Evans, director of the county's Department of Public Works, said the fee increase is needed to offset the landfill's $37,000 deficit.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 5, 1996
DEARBORN, Mich. -- Ford Motor Co.'s U.S. vehicle sales fell 2.2 percent in November, slightly better than analysts expected.Car sales slid 12 percent, wiping out the company's 5.7 percent gain in sales of pickups, minivans and sport utility vehicles.November is traditionally a lackluster month for auto sales because of bad weather and holiday-focused shoppers, but this year was worse than last. U.S. car and truck sales slipped 1.6 percent, compared with November 1995.Ford is cutting prices with big rebates to try to maintain its sales momentum, offering incentives across a broad range of its cars and giving employees leases on the Taurus to help keep it the best-selling car in the U.S. market.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1993
U.S. vehicle sales up 30.2%Sales of domestically produced vehicles rose 30.2 percent in early May, the nation's automakers said yesterday, extending the strengthening automotive market into a fourth straight month.Demand for light trucks, which include mini-vans and sport utility vehicles, showed particular strength, with a 44.4 percent sales gain in the period of May 1-10. Sales of domestically produced cars were at 157,496, up 20.8 percent from last year's 130,408. Vehicle sales overall totaled 283,820, compared with 217,905 last year.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,Sun Reporter | December 27, 2006
Two 16-year-old boys were seriously injured yesterday evening when the off-road dirt bike they were riding collided with a sport utility vehicle at a heavily traveled intersection in Brooklyn Park, Anne Arundel County police said. The boys were not wearing helmets when the crash occurred about 4:45 p.m. at Ritchie Highway and Hammonds Lane, police said. One was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center and the other to Johns Hopkins Hospital. Their names were not released, but police said one boy was in critical condition last night and the other stable.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,sun reporter | December 17, 2006
Sheriff L. Jesse Bane and his chief deputy will relinquish the use of brawny sport utility vehicles driven by their predecessors and turn the vehicles over to the agency for use by deputies. The sheriff's 2004 Ford Expedition, an eight-seat SUV purchased new for $28,700 by Sheriff R. Thomas Golding, will be available for deputies performing an extradition or traveling to out-of-county training, an agency spokesman said. The chief deputy's 2004 Chevy Trailblazer, bought used for $15,900 in 2006, will be used at the sheriff's training academy.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish | October 28, 2006
A 17-year-old Westminster teenager died when his sport utility vehicle collided with a dump truck and both trucks overturned at Route 31 and Tahoma Farm Road in Westminster yesterday morning, state police said. Charles P. Diegel of the first block of Wentworth Court died at the scene about 7:15 a.m. Diegel's black Mercury Mountaineer failed to yield the right of way to the dump truck, which was traveling east on Route 31, according to the state police preliminary investigation. At the intersection, Diegel had been stopped behind a school bus before making a right turn and striking the dump truck, police said.
NEWS
By V. Dion Haynes and V. Dion Haynes,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 2, 2003
INGLEWOOD, Calif. - Agnes Kambe had her choice of such prizes as a Toyota Highlander sport utility vehicle, a trip to the Bahamas, a camera or a mountain bike. Instead, she opted for what she considers the jackpot - $5,000 - and won it twice. Kambe isn't a game show contestant - she's a nurse. Record-high shortages in the nursing profession are creating a give-away frenzy among hospitals. While the faltering economy has halted sign-on incentives practically everywhere else, hospitals are wooing nurses with offers of vacations, vehicles, massages, concierge services, free tuition for themselves and their children and bonuses of up to $10,000.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 14, 2003
A 34-year-old man died early yesterday when he was struck on Mountain Road in Pasadena by a sport utility vehicle whose driver stopped, got out and looked at the victim lying on the ground, before allegedly driving away in panic, Anne Arundel County police reported. The 1998 Jeep Wrangler went only a short distance, however, before the driver stopped, talked about the situation with his passenger, and returned to the accident site near North Shore Road, police said. The victim, Alton Davis Slay III of the 200 block of Maryland Ave., was pronounced dead at the scene.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2003
I ADMIT to not being a big fan of sport utility vehicles; some readers have picked up on that bias. Brad Closs e-mailed me recently in defense of SUVs. "While it is currently `in' to bash SUVs because they take up a lot of space, are hard to see around and use too much gas, there is an interesting comparison to be made between the most popular SUVs and minivans," he said. He compares the vehicles' dimensions, noting that "the most popular minivan (the Chrysler/Dodge Grand Caravan)" is almost a foot longer and over a half foot wider than the Ford Explorer, according to Consumer Reports' Annual Auto Issue.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 2, 1996
DETROIT -- The U.S. auto industry started the spring selling season with its traditional bang, as consumers spent their income tax refunds and pushed April sales up 13 percent over last year.Chrysler Corp.'s April sales soared 33 percent compared with April last year, the company said yesterday. General Motors Corp., overcoming the effects of a paralyzing strike in March, said its sales rose 8.1 percent.The results come as consumers shrugged off higher gas prices and snapped up record numbers of minivans, pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles, which get about 20 miles a gallon instead of 28 for the average car.Sales again were propped up by rebates and low-interest loans.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | May 28, 2008
Shares of General Motors Corp. fell yesterday to their lowest value since 1982 after Citigroup Inc. cut its rating on the world's largest automaker to "hold" from "buy," noting that he company faces "cash-burn risks" as the costs of raw materials rise. "Auto fundamentals are poised to deteriorate beyond 2008," Citigroup analysts wrote in a note. GM's decline extended a slide that has reached 30 percent this year. The shares dropped 18 cents, or 1 percent, to $17.42 in trading on the New York Stock Exchange, the lowest price since October 1982.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2003
A half-dozen shiny big SUVs were lined up outside St. Joseph Medical Center yesterday morning, their volunteer drivers proving to the world that they are nothing like the arrogant, self-centered, fuel-squandering ignoramuses of stereotype. "You hear it on the news - all about the gas-guzzling hogs driving SUVs," said Jeff Hegberg, climbing back into his $40,000, 7,200-pound, black 2002 Chevrolet Suburban. "Well, on a day like this, what would the hospitals do without us?" Then he was off on another run, transporting critical hospital workers: three more drop-offs, two pickups, from Carney to Bel Air. Hospitals around the region relied on volunteer drivers such as Hegberg yesterday to keep operating in the aftermath of the worst snowstorm in 80 years.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 20, 2002
There's no nice way of saying this: If you paid big bucks for one of those tall, expensive SUVs, you are a fool. Twice a fool actually, because not only did you pay one of the highest mark-ups ever calculated by Detroit, but you also are putting yourself and your family in danger. That's the message of a hard-hitting Frontline report, "Rollover: The Hidden History of the SUV," airing tomorrow on PBS. Between "Rollover" and last week's "American Porn," Frontline is on a muckraking roll.
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