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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 1997
I had absolutely no intention of reviewing the Halloween night recital presented by Monte Maxwell, the Juilliard-trained Texan who was appointed organist of the Naval Academy Chapel in February.It was to be a purely recreational evening for the family, a chance to yank the kids away from the sugary greed of trick-or-treating to hear a bit of spooky music banged out on that mighty chapel organ.But what I experienced was so thoroughly delightful that I couldn't help thinking that the academy might have bestowed on us another holiday tradition that could last for many years.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 25, 2013
The stream of visitors who passed through the iron gates at Fayette and Greene streets this week reverenced Edgar Allan Poe's monument and grave, but then they soon drifted along the lanes and brick paths of this historic churchyard on the western edge of downtown Baltimore. This Halloween offers visitors a chance to go one better. The catacombs under the 1851 Westminster Presbyterian Church will be open Thursday. And while I am not much of a believer in ghosts, this quirky part of old-time Baltimore is a must destination for the ghost-believing or merely historically curious.
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FEATURES
October 7, 2004
Got a spooky event planned for Halloween weekend? Submit it for consideration for the Oct. 28 issue of LIVE by e-mailing to arts@baltsun.com or faxing to 410-783-2519 by Oct. 15.
TRAVEL
The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
Claims that Ellicott City is haunted are old hat. The historic mill town dates to the 1700s, is the subject of a new paranormal book and offers ghost tours. It has survived hurricanes, devastating floods, fires and hooligans - making it an ideal setting for ominous, history-infused tales. So ideal that Trip Advisor has just named Ellicott City to its list of 10 spooky American getaways to celebrate Halloween. The travel guide website includes it among such infamous U.S. haunts as Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., Roswell N.M. and Salem, Mass.
NEWS
November 1, 2000
Last week we asked you who opened the door when Zo-Zo knocked on the door of the spooky, dark house at the end of the suspenseful Halloween story, "The Spooky Book." It was none other than Andrew, the little boy reading the same book! Congratulations to Reginald Thomas, Patrice Davis, Kyisha Rhames and Crystal Hammett for their correct answers. All four are in Mrs. Lloyd's fifth-grade class at Samuel C. Taylor elementary school. Teachers: For stance questions related to Just for Kids' stories, check out www.sunspot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LAKAIIA WILLIAMS | October 19, 2006
Head to the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore this and next Saturday and Sunday to celebrate the tricks and treats of Halloween. Join your favorite animals at ZooBOOO!, the annual Halloween Party. There will be lots of spooky fun for kids and adults. Kids can enjoy free trick-or-treating, haunted hay rides, costume contests, the spooky ZooChoo train, magicians, jugglers, games and more. Meanwhile, adults can take part in events like the pumpkin-pie eating contest for prizes including restaurant gift cards.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 30, 1996
There is something spooky about a society whose second-greatest public holiday celebrates gluttony, death, fear and the occult.Richard Jewell served the purpose of assuring the Olympic tourists that the terrorism was over. There is no further need for him, or possibility of solving the case.If the campaign fund-raising orgy offends, think how much more would have been raised and spent had this election been at allcompetitive.No role here for Todd Zeile next season. The Orioles already have a third baseman, last name Ripken, first name to be negotiated.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIM SMITH | October 20, 2005
The U.S. Naval Academy Choir's Halloween extravaganza, directed by Monte Maxwell, chapel organist and assistant director of music at the academy, arrives in Baltimore this week. The concert, which draws thousands to its Annapolis performancae each year, adds lighting and special effects to accompany a Fright Night kind of program, including Bach's spooky Tocatta and Fugue in D minor and music from Phantom of the Opera. The concert is at 8 p.m. Friday at Second Presbyterian Church, 4200 St. Paul St. Tickets are $15. Call 410-663-3052.
FEATURES
By ANNA EISENBERG AND SARAH YURGEALITIS and ANNA EISENBERG AND SARAH YURGEALITIS,SUN REPORTERS | October 8, 2005
Didn't get enough amusement park thrills this past summer? Despite the cooler weather, area amusement parks remain open and offer some of the fall's best attractions. Instead of the heat and long lines of high season, enjoy haunted houses, spooky mazes and delicious autumn treats. Here's a rundown on what some area parks are offering this fall: Six Flags America Fright Fest 2005 runs through Oct. 30 and features a slew of spooky attractions like the Midnight Express Haunted Train, Hall Manor House of Horrors and a Trick-or-Treat Trail.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
GETTING A BEAD ON FASHION Tired of seeing people coming and going in the very togs you picked up at the mega-mall chain store? Well, have we got a shopping experience for you. For the last 37 years the Bead has been the kind of shop that offers uniquely funky and fabulous women's clothing (Italian faux leopard swing coats for $129), jewelry ($7.99 sterling earrings) and accessories (velvet burnout ponchos, fluffy pink shrugs) to Baltimore women and to celebrities such as Oprah Winfrey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
After a performance of "The Addams Family," the Broadway musical now playing at the Hippodrome Theatre, a tall, bald, mustachioed man went backstage to greet the cast - the original, the ultimate Gomez Addams, John Astin. Douglas Sills, who portrays the head of the spooky household in the musical, dropped to the floor and did an elaborate kowtow. "You're a hero," Sills said. "Thank you for passing the torch to us. " That torch was lit 48 years ago, when the "The Addams Family" series debuted, fleshing out the slightly spooky, thoroughly contented characters created by New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams.
TRAVEL
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Halloween in Fells Point? Been there, done that. This year, a quick trip can get you to a haunted bus tour, a frightful forest excursion or a late-night soiree with Hollywood elite. If you head to Atlantic City, N.J., you'll have a chance to party with "Twilight" star Kellan Lutz and "True Blood's" Joe Manganiello while vying for $20,000 in prizes. On Saturday, Lutz will host "Dance in the Twilight" at MIXX and mur.mur nightclubs in the Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa. Lutz won't be the only celeb on site.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
It's late on an autumn evening, slate-colored clouds are gliding across the face of a nearly full moon, and in a dimly lit studio about a nautical mile from the South River, a woman who may or may not have traveled through time fingers her lapis lazuli pendant, sits at her microphone and begins to speak very softly. "Our waxing gibbous moon shines over the Chesapeake Bay tonight, and 'Chesapeake Moon' shines on WRYR," she says, her voice as tranquil as a breeze on the waves. "I'm Carol Bennett, inviting you to participate in metaphysical talk radio.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2008
To get good and scared on Halloween night, a parent doesn't have to look far. There's the fear of a wayward Jujube getting lodged in your preteen's braces, the terror of running out of candy and leaving your neighbors on the front stoop to survey your messy house through the storm door and the horror of your kids hauling home pounds of cavity-inducing confections that everyone at home finds impossible to resist. But what really scares many parents on Halloween is something entirely prosaic and yet altogether necessary: dinner.
NEWS
By Special to The Sun | October 31, 2007
HALLOWEEN DRINKS ARE ALL ABOUT frightful fun. And even if you've put off thoughts of entertaining until today, they're the perfect last-minute way to make a spooky splash when trick-or-treating starts tonight. This isn't a time for your attractive, mouthwatering drink ideas. Beverages for this ghoulish celebration must be fantastic, atrocious and even somewhat grotesque - the more frightening, the better. Think color when creating Halloween brews - green, red, blue, orange and black. To produce the necessary eerie hues, experiment with green, orange and black sodas (root beer or cola)
TRAVEL
By Richard P. Carpenter and Richard P. Carpenter,The Boston Globe | October 21, 2007
This is the month to shiver and scream. Throughout the nation, scary or zany Halloween events are being held. Among them: Universal Orlando says its Halloween Horror Nights, running through Nov. 3, may be too intense for younger children, what with the presence of such film luminaries as Freddy, Jason, and Leatherface. Among the attractions are eight haunted houses, four new shows and a Midway of the Bizarre. You can pay $64.95 for a ticket and pick your date, or for the same price you can get admission on 13 selected nights, including Halloween.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | October 30, 2004
AN ANONYMOUS donor once deposited a couple of ancient Baltimore Sun almanacs on my front porch. Over the years, I've become particularly attached to the 1897 edition, which, among many things, informs its readers that Federal Hill Park was 8 acres large and the highest point in the city was Garrison and Oakford avenues, at 460 feet above sea level. But these Baltimore footnotes are not what fascinate me. It is the monthly tables for the sun's rising and setting, precisely in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,[sun reporter] | October 29, 2006
THEY'RE CREEPY AND KOOKY, mysterious and spooky -- altogether ooky. And when it comes to television comedy, they're about as good as it's ever gotten. Which means that this Halloween should be especially celebratory, since it's the first since last week's long-awaited arrival on DVD of The Addams Family, a mid-'60s sitcom centering on the most charmingly horrific misfits you'd ever want to meet. For $29.95, you can get the show's first 22 episodes, spread over three discs -- surely a small price to pay for more than 10 hours of television at its most hilariously exuberant, not to mention surprisingly life-affirming, For two seasons on ABC, from 1964 to 1966, the Addamses ruled as the happiest, most welcoming, most compellingly abnormal family on TV. The characters, loosely based on the single-panel cartoons of The New Yorker's legendary Charles Addams, quickly became pop-culture mainstays.
NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub and Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | October 29, 2006
ARE YOU CONVINCED THAT TASTEFUL Halloween decorations are an oxymoron? If your neighbors decorate their yards with homemade tombstones, line the walk with garbage bag pumpkins or hang ghosts made out of old white sheets from the trees, you may be convinced good taste has taken a holiday. But designers and party planners say Halloween decor doesn't have to be a horror show. Forget heavy chains, skeletons and creepy skulls. You can have fun decorating without setting off an alarm for the "style police."
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