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By Brenda L. Becker and Brenda L. Becker,Special to the sun | May 17, 1998
"Dr. Spock: An American Life," by Thomas Maier. Harcourt Brace. Illustrated. 488 pages. $30.When Dr. Benjamin Spock died in March at age 94, his obituaries were as overstuffed and unlikely as a John Irving novel. The two main acts of Spock's epochal career - as author of the Baby Boom child care bible and then, in the Sixties, as goofy aging antiwar protester - were familiar enough.But who remembered that Spock, as a gangling Yalie, rowed on the U.S. gold-medal crew team in the "Chariots of Fire" Olympics?
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June 12, 2009
The Hangover * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 STARS) $44.9 million $44.9 million 1 week Rated: R Running time: 100 minutes What it's about: A group of friends (including Zach Galifianakis, above) struggle to piece together what happened after an out-of-control Vegas bachelor party. Our take: This relentlessly jocular movie is designed to deliver lower-belly laughs with sleek contemporary efficiency. Up **** ( 4 STARS) $44.1 million $137.2 million 2 weeks Rated: PG Running time: 96 minutes What it's about: A 78-year-old widower (above)
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FEATURES
February 25, 1992
The sixth edition of "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care" offers parents plenty of long-standing advice and some that is new for the '90s. Haere are some of the new entries in Dr. Spock's venerable book:*Quality time: "The idea of quality time in itself is fine. But I'm concerned that a few conscientious, hard-working parents take it as an obligation - whenever they're at home of for a certain number of hours daily - to be talking, playing, reading with their children, long afteer patience and enjoyment have run out."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
Oakley Henry Saunders Jr., a retired pediatrician who had been president of the old Provident Hospital and later worked in medical accreditation, died of cancer Tuesday at his Forest Park home. He was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore, he attended Frederick Douglass High School and served in the Army. He earned a degree from Howard University and was a 1957 Meharry Medical College graduate. After an internship at Provident Hospital and a residency at what is now the University of Maryland Medical Center, he established a private pediatric practice in 1960 on Madison Avenue.
FEATURES
By Orange County Register | February 10, 1993
Move over, Dr. Spock, there's a new generation of books about pregnancy and parenting out there.From "The Miracle Year," a guide to the six months before and after the birth of a first baby, to "When Good Kids Do Bad Things," a guide for the parents of teen-agers, and everything in between: "The Six Vital Ingredients of Self-Esteem and How to Develop Them in Your Child," "The Seven Secrets of Effective Fathers" and "Raising Your Type A Child."There's even "Miss Manners' Guide to Rearing Perfect Children" and whole bookshelves more -- a boomlet of baby books to keep pace with the boomlet of babies.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 19, 1998
BOSTON -- It was not a book that parents merely read. We clutched it like a steering wheel. We held onto it like a security blanket through the sleep-deprived terrors of early parenthood.When the hospital irrationally released the helpless 6-pound infant into our care without demanding to see a parenting degree, a dated driver's license, a passing test score, we had Dr. Spock's index to cling to."Newborns: Feelings in the early weeks."When we were poised at the fearful edge of the first bath, we gripped the spine of this book as tightly as the wobbly head of our newborn and looked it up."
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Special to The Sun | November 9, 1994
God love him. Dr. Benjamin M. Spock, the pediatrician whose book "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care" sold 40 million copies in 39 languages, is still reflecting, teaching and writing at age 91. His latest work, "A Better World for Our Children," decries America's moral and spiritual deterioration and offers ideas -- some very specific and practical -- to reverse the trend.As many remember, Dr. Spock is more than just a world-famous pediatrician. He worked for the nuclear test ban treaty in 1962, spoke out against our action in Vietnam and was arrested, tried and convicted for conspiring to counsel, aid and abet resistance to the draft.
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By Clint Williams and Clint Williams,Arizona Republic | October 6, 1993
For someone once labeled a radical, Dr. Benjamin Spock champions some pretty old-fashioned notions:* Family should be a person's highest priority.* Mothers should try to stay home with their children.* Husbands and wives should work harder to resolve conflicts before splintering the family through divorce.* Parents should control what their children watch on television.* Parents should teach moral and spiritual values.The erosion of such old-fashioned notions has created "multiple pressures that disturb parents these days," Dr. Spock said in a telephone interview from his Maine summer home.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
Dr. Spock brings his bible on baby and child care into the 1990s with the same comforting words he used to introduce it to parents of the last five decades: "Trust yourself, you know more than you think you do."At the end of the just-published sixth edition of "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care," (Pocket Books, New York, $6.99), however, there isn't much comfort. There is, instead, a detailed list of the "unprecedented strains on American families today" and an exhortation to parents to become politically active and to rear children "to become kind, cooperative, feeling people.
FEATURES
By Nancy Imperiale and Nancy Imperiale,Orlando Sentinel | November 22, 1992
What kind of maniac picks on milk?That's what critics muttered after Dr. Benjamin Spock appeared at a press conference in September questioning the notion that milk does a body good.It should have come as no surprise. Dr. Spock has made a career out of tipping sacred cows. This is the same man who regularly marches against the military, aided draft dodgers in the '60s and told generations of strict parents to stop spanking their kids.The author of the best-selling "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care" has never followed the crowd as much as his conscience.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 8, 2009
The new Star Trek arouses an instant affection that sometimes rises to ecstasy and never entirely wears out. Without any old-fogy nostalgia and with an impudent, non-obnoxious wit, it will win hordes of new admirers, while reminding the venerable franchise's followers why they became fans in the first place. With crackling fresh actors moving into the wittily revamped roles of James T. Kirk, Spock, Uhura, Bones, Sulu, Chekov and Scotty, the movie recaptures the team spirit that helped make the series memorable as much as its sci-fi inspirations or social-political parables.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,THE MORNING CALL IN ALLENTOWN, PA | April 20, 2008
Who wins your money-spending battles, your inner Mr. Spock or Homer Simpson? For a long time, economists assumed consumers made calculated and logical spending decisions that are in their best interests; that they would act like the always cool and calm Mr. Spock from Star Trek. Problem is, in the real world we often behave like the dopey Homer Simpson of the The Simpsons. Like Homer, we repeatedly get into trouble because of poor and impulsive decisions. You need only look at the rising levels of debt, bankruptcy and mortgage foreclosures, coupled with low savings rates and closets full of ridiculous and never-used junk, to see that somewhere consumers have gone awry with money decisions.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and By Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2005
In the 1800s, before many physicians specialized in treating children, mothers were doctors to their families. In the 1950s, a quarter-century after pediatricians formed their own professional organization, Dr. Benjamin Spock was the guru parents turned to for advice. But the modern pediatrician has heavy competition. Parents have sleep coaches and message boards and moms' groups, Supernanny and La Leche League. With a few computer keystrokes, they can look up when their toddler should be walking or take an online quiz to see if a kindergartner might have ADHD.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2001
"Starfleet Command Vol. II: Empires at War" warps past most offerings in the long line of Star Trek PC games but requires real attention to tactics and strategy. An update to the first-volume game released in the fall 1999, "SFC II" was created by Taldren and is published by Interplay. It has better graphics and tactical challenges and is more fun to play than the original - which was no slouch. Both volumes take place in the 23rd century and are based on the turn-taking board game "Star Fleet Battles."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brendan Maher and Brendan Maher,contributing writer | March 26, 2000
A day after he celebrates his 69th birthday, author, actor, musician and photographer Leonard Nimoy comes to Baltimore tomorrow evening to appear in another of his many roles: that of Jewish activist. Nimoy has written books, directed movies and made more albums than the Beatles. But more than 30 years after he first played the role, he is still most recognized for his portrayal of that pointy-eared pillar of logic: Mr. Spock of "Star Trek." Though the television series lasted only three seasons (1966-69)
FEATURES
By Bettijane Levine and Bettijane Levine,Los Angeles Times News Service | September 2, 1994
Dr. Benjamin Spock is 91 and worried.Not about the usual things, like health -- "I don't feel great, but until two years ago I didn't even feel old"; or love -- he's happily married to a woman 40 years his junior; or money -- his famous child-care book still sells half a million copies each year.Spock's big problem, he says, is the realization that he'll leave America's children in a worse situation than he found them -- a fact the activist says he wants to fight with each remaining breath.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 1998
For more than a half-century, Dr. Benjamin Spock has been the sage of sensible parenting, dispensing advice on matters from croup to hyperactivity in his enduring book, "Baby and Child Care."But now it's the baby doctor who needs help, according to his wife, who issued a highly unusual appeal this week for donations to subsidize costly home health care for the ailing 94-year-old pediatrician and author.With their savings drained by bills for 24-hour nursing, a macrobiotic chef, yoga therapy, twice-weekly psychoanalysis and shiatsu massage, Mary Morgan, Spock's wife of 21 years, said she decided to turn to friends for help through a letter-writing campaign and a series of fund-raising parties to coincide with the publication of the seventh revised edition of the baby book on the author's birthday, May 2.Spock's two sons by a previous marriage, John and Michael, are not commenting about the appeal, which has circulated largely through Internet messages passed from friend to friend, and was reported yesterday in the Boston Globe.
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