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Split Second

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 1, 1992
As if from a nightmare, I bolted awake one night last week. A question had beaten its way into my head, and would not let me go."Why," I screamed to the mute, blank bedroom walls, "did they call it 'Split Second'?"There is only one answer: because it lasts for far too many split seconds.It's like a bad, cheap imitation of "Alien" filmed at a surf's-up theme park in Kansas. Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink, nor a thought to think. What the movie has in abundance, however, is pork -- of the hammy variety.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein on Monday reached out to the black community by answering call-in questions on WOLB's Larry Young Morning Show about his controversial decision to not prosecute the three Baltimore police officers involved in the death of East Baltimore resident Anthony Anderson. On Thursday, Bernstein said his office had determined that Detective Todd A. Strohman used appropriate action when he tackled Anderson during a September drug arrest that resulted in broken ribs and a lacerated spleen, which killed the 46-year-old man. Officers said Anderson was attempting to swallow drugs while walking away from them, which caused Strohman to use a “bear hug” to take him to the ground and preserve evidence.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 4, 1992
As if from a nightmare, I bolted awake one night last week. A question had beaten its way into my head, and would not let me go."Why," I screamed to the mute, blank bedroom walls, "did they call it 'Split Second'?"There is only one answer: because it lasts for far too many split seconds.It's like a bad, cheap imitation of "Alien" filmed at a surf's-up theme park in Kansas. Water, water, everywhere, and not a drop to drink, nor a thought to think. What the movie has in abundance, however, is pork -- of the hammy variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
The production of "The Mystery of Irma Vep" running at Everyman Theatre has a portrait that drips blood, an Egyptian sarcophagus, hidden passages out of which characters unexpectedly pop, a mad woman in the dungeon and such deliberately tongue-in-cheek dialogue as, "He killed the wrong wolf!" As outlandish as the onstage antics might seem, they can't hold a snuffed-out candle to the frenzied activity taking place backstage. Three dressers and a stagehand conduct a carefully choreographed dance that allows the show's two actors to make up to 50 full costume changes during each performance, complete with Victorian-era petticoats, wigs, false teeth and top hats - often in two seconds or less.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | June 2, 1991
It took a split second for the little Ford Escort GT racing down Old Court Road Friday night to skid out of control and into a tree, a split second for two local families to lose teen-age sons."
SPORTS
September 14, 1998
Running backsJay Graham ran harder than he did all preseason but still needs to be more decisive. Starter Errict Rhett looked slow and sluggish at times, seemingly hitting the holes a split second too late. -- C-QuarterbacksJim Harbaugh had nervous feet and moved around in the pocket when there was no pressure. Backup Eric Zeier threw well and had some nice touch passes. -- C+ReceiversThis wasn't a great day for any one receiver, but the Ravens spread it around with Eric Green and Michael Jackson having clutch catches.
FEATURES
By GARO LACHINIAN | June 28, 1992
As the squeegee glides across the glass, droplets of soapy water trail off the rubber blade and disappear below. Most won't reach the ground: Most evaporate as they descend the 25 stories toward the pavement.Yes, it's a long way down. But don't look down. Look out at the Baltimore only seen from a pigeon's perch, wind whistling in your ears and birds swooping around as you glide, stop, glide down a wall of windows.Call it urban rock-climbing. Call it thrill-seeking. Call it a paycheck. It's just another day at work for Admiral Services Window Cleaners, who make many of Baltimore's skyscrapers glisten.
NEWS
By Algerina Perna and Algerina Perna,Sun Photographer | December 16, 2007
When I got a positive answer to my request to photograph the annual holiday lighting of the historic Washington Monument in Mount Vernon and the spectacular display of fireworks that accompanied it, I was both excited and a little apprehensive. The pressure was on to record this Charm City ritual for the front page on deadline, and to shoot video for The Sun's Web site. I set up a tripod for the still camera in an 11th-floor room at the Peabody Court Hotel at the west side of Mount Vernon Square, an often-used vantage point for photographing the monument.
NEWS
By GREGORY P. KANE | August 1, 1994
With one sweep of the gavel, Judge Kathleen Kennedy-Powell upheld sanity in the American judicial system.She ruled that evidence police seized without a warrant from O.J. Simpson's home the night his ex-wife and a friend of hers were stabbed to death was, in fact, admissible evidence.Mr. Simpson's lawyers tried to have the evidence excluded on the grounds that the search violated the Fourth Amendment guarantee against unreasonable searches and seizures. That is exactly what they should have done, as good lawyers for their client.
NEWS
September 30, 2009
State, feds must go further on tobacco I am writing to thank The Sun for the excellent editorial "Addicted at an early age" (Sept. 24) and to clarify a few points. First, while it is a good move for public health for the Food and Drug Administration to ban flavored cigarettes, The Sun is correct to point out that this ban does not include the extremely popular cheap cigars that come in a variety of enticing flavors and are available by the single for less than $1. Nor does the ban include smokeless tobacco products that also come in fruity flavors attractive to kids.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2009
Over time, most good marriages develop a secret language. At a party, one of you will be able to pull out an agreed-upon code phrase that sounds innocent enough, such as "Did you check in with the baby sitter?" But both of you will know this really means, "We'll stay just 10 minutes more and then leave." If the two of you are not all that verbal, you might use symbolic gestures instead, much like the ones professional ballplayers use. For example, a hand brushing hair off the forehead means: "Let's exit this boring social obligation."
NEWS
September 30, 2009
State, feds must go further on tobacco I am writing to thank The Sun for the excellent editorial "Addicted at an early age" (Sept. 24) and to clarify a few points. First, while it is a good move for public health for the Food and Drug Administration to ban flavored cigarettes, The Sun is correct to point out that this ban does not include the extremely popular cheap cigars that come in a variety of enticing flavors and are available by the single for less than $1. Nor does the ban include smokeless tobacco products that also come in fruity flavors attractive to kids.
NEWS
By Algerina Perna and Algerina Perna,Sun Photographer | December 16, 2007
When I got a positive answer to my request to photograph the annual holiday lighting of the historic Washington Monument in Mount Vernon and the spectacular display of fireworks that accompanied it, I was both excited and a little apprehensive. The pressure was on to record this Charm City ritual for the front page on deadline, and to shoot video for The Sun's Web site. I set up a tripod for the still camera in an 11th-floor room at the Peabody Court Hotel at the west side of Mount Vernon Square, an often-used vantage point for photographing the monument.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
From the cover How do soccer fans keep track of the players as they sprint back and forth between the goal boxes during a World Cup match? They look for the colored uniforms, of course. As obvious as the answer seems, the question has mystified scientists since the early 1990s. That's when researchers discovered that most of us can only concentrate our attention on three objects at a time, a finding that raised questions about our ability to follow sporting events such as soccer, football and lacrosse - with up to two dozen players ranging the field.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
An FBI agent who mistakenly shot an unarmed Pasadena man in the face last year says in court papers that he believed the unwitting victim was a wanted bank robber who was reaching for a weapon when, "in a split-second decision," the agent fired "a single shot for his and his fellow officers' safety." Special Agent Christopher R. Braga offered his first detailed account of the event in court papers made public yesterday as he and two other agents argued that a $10 million federal lawsuit brought by shooting victim Joseph C. Schultz lacks merit and should be dismissed.
NEWS
By Jennifer Grow | June 6, 2001
I LIVE on a quiet street in Canton where nothing ever happens, but at 3 a.m. recently there were gunshots outside my windows. There were too many to count and they woke me from a sound sleep. I ducked for cover and said a quick prayer. My heart was pounding. The next morning, neighbors were examining their cars and row homes looking for bullet holes. I'm told the shooters were joyriding, using cars for target practice. I'd like to pretend the shooting was an isolated incident, a nuisance or prank, not tinged with anger and violence.
NEWS
January 8, 1995
Phil Grout's Magic EyeThe recent article in a local newspaper about the photographer, Phil Grout, was informative and enlightening. While he was the staff photographer for the Hanover Evening Sun, I was always entertained and constantly amazed by his talent. He was blessed with the ability to capture life in a moment that would last forever.One favorite of mine is displayed in the Carroll County office building, as the article mentioned, and also a copy as it appeared for the first time in the Sun many years ago was cut out by me and saved.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | June 30, 2006
From the cover How do soccer fans keep track of the players as they sprint back and forth between the goal boxes during a World Cup match? They look for the colored uniforms, of course. As obvious as the answer seems, the question has mystified scientists since the early 1990s. That's when researchers discovered that most of us can only concentrate our attention on three objects at a time, a finding that raised questions about our ability to follow sporting events such as soccer, football and lacrosse - with up to two dozen players ranging the field.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1999
For the second straight year, River Hill made a clean sweep at the Howard County Cross Country Championships.The boys team and individual titles were never in doubt yesterday as the Hawks set a county record with 20 points, far ahead of runner-up Atholton at 99 points.And senior Mike Styczynski led a 1-2-3 River Hill finish that included sophomore runner-up Shane Stroup and senior third-place finisher Steven Chu.The girls race was as exciting as they get, with River Hill winning by just six points over runner-up Mount Hebron, 50-56.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1999
In his 1982 farce, "Noises Off," novelist-playwright Michael Frayn gives us a hilarious, behind-the-scenes view of a second-rate British theater troupe preparing a second-rate show in January, opening in February and going on tour in March.But there is nothing second rate about 2nd Star's production of the show at Bowie Theater in Whitemarsh Park. Even the theater is a delightful place with a large stage and comfortable seating for 150 people.Charles Maloney has gathered a totally professional troupe and directs them with split-second timing as the chaos of backstage romances, rivalries and arguments expands through each act and the traffic onstage increases accordingly.
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