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NEWS
February 26, 2005
On Thursday, February 24, 2005, CELIA HELEN SPITZ BARON (nee Feinstein), beloved wife of the late Morton Spitz and the late David Baron and loving mother of Bill Spitz, Sue Pelovitz, David Spitz and Joyce Spitz; dear mother-in-law of Margery Kates and Charity Goodman; adored sister of Bonnie Rosenblitt, Miriam Kurland, Alan "Brother" Feinstein and the late Jean Levy; adored sister-in-law of Jules Levy, Mike Rosenblitt, Nancy Feinstein, David and Horty...
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 12, 2009
Mark Spitz says he's not bitter about losing swimming's most sacred record to Michael Phelps , who 15 months ago cemented a spot in Olympic history with eight gold medals, one more than Spitz won in 1972. "It's sort of like I'm the first man on the moon," Spitz said. "He's the second man on the moon. He collected more rocks." Phelps of Baltimore also is collecting scrutiny. "Of course, there's a lot of pressure," Spitz said. He said, "Michael is not a perfect person, and neither am I," a reference to Phelps' having been photographed last November inhaling from a marijuana pipe.
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SPORTS
By The Denver Post | August 16, 2008
BEIJING - They are both tied to the number seven, as in medals. They both swam six of the same events and set world records in all of them. They were both the talk of the sporting world. Yet one is tall and ripped; one was shorter and sinewy. One is modest; one was cocky. One looks bad in a mustache; one looked good. Michael Phelps has won seven gold medals at these Beijing Olympics, tying Mark Spitz's unheard-of record in the 1972 Munich Olympics. But it has been 36 years since Spitz last entered competition.
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,Tribune Newspapers | July 26, 2009
ROME - - This might have been a new one in the storied career of Michael Phelps. Phelps went through the paces at a pre-meet news conference at a major swimming event and was not asked about Mark Spitz, not even whether he was relieved, finally, not to be compared to Spitz any longer after eclipsing the icon by winning eight gold medals last summer at the Olympics in Beijing. Instead, there was a light moment Friday near the end of the session about another future opponent looming over Phelps - in a different way than Spitz once did - one towering figure capable of blocking the sun. Shaq.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | April 13, 1991
Mark Spitz appears like a ghost from Olympics past, a swimming icon who was last seen in 1972 Munich Games wrapping a seventh gold medal around his neck.After that, he dabbled in dentistry and Southern California real estate. The price of land skyrocketed. His fame plummeted.Then, 1 1/2 years ago, Spitz decided to plunge back into the pool. It was the unlikeliest of comebacks -- a 40-year-old old man trying to reclaim his legend in a sport dominated by teen-agers.But ready or not, Spitz, now 41, will display whatever talent he has left in a series of nationally televised 50-meter butterfly match races at the Mission Viejo (Calif.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | August 16, 2008
BEIJING - It's easy to feel awed when you're watching history unfold. Michael Phelps has reminded us of that so many times this week, stringing together seven remarkable races that have been thrilling, entertaining and nerve-racking. What's less easy is putting it all into immediate historical perspective. Phelps earned a $1 million bonus today from Speedo by tying Mark Spitz's record for most gold medals in a single Olympics. He'll have a chance to win his eighth tomorrow in the medley relay.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2003
COLLEGE PARK - Another day, another distinction for Michael Phelps. And another comparison to Mark Spitz. The 18-year-old from the North Baltimore Aquatic Club won the 400-meter freestyle at swimming's Summer Nationals last night. His fourth victory of the meet produced his second American record in as many nights, and gained him a spot on a figurative podium alongside the Olympic legend he's chasing. Spitz won seven gold medals in the 1972 Summer Olympics, and Phelps aims to duplicate that feat in Athens, Greece next summer.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
LONG BEACH, Calif. - This wasn't just another item on the full itinerary for the presumptive star of the 2004 Olympics. Next Wednesday: News conference with Cindy Crawford at 1 p.m.; evening appearance at the ESPYs. Last night: Win the 200-meter butterfly at the U.S. Olympic team trials for swimming; pick up first-place medal and meet Mark Spitz. "That was one of the most exciting moments I've had in sports," Phelps said. "Something I'll never forget." The Olympic legend and heir apparent finally spoke and shook hands, in a moment that mixed choreography with the impromptu.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 13, 2008
More than three decades ago, Mark Spitz was the American super-athlete with enough gold hanging around his neck to qualify him for his own safety deposit box at Fort Knox. Today, the former swimming star, 58, who captured seven golds at the 1972 Summer Games in Munich sounds a little curmudgeonly as he complains that no one has invited him to Beijing to preside as the swimming god emeritus while Michael Phelps carries the standard for America. "I never got invited," Spitz was quoted as saying.
NEWS
April 18, 2003
On Wednesday, April 16, 2003, BEVERLY SKLAR (nee Feld), loving wife of the late Jack Sklar, beloved mother of Ellen J. Wolter of Frederick, MD, devoted mother-in-law of Larry A. Wolter, beloved sister of Hilda Greenberg of Baltimore, MD and Paula Goodman of Norfolk, VA. Loving grandmother of Cindy Spitz and Craig Spitz. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS Inc., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson La., on Sunday, April 20, 9 A.M. Interment Oheb Shalom Memorial Park, Berrymans Lane. Please omit flowers.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | August 20, 2008
He smashes Olympic records, he hauls home more gold than any athlete in history, he inspires adjectives. Gather 'round wordsmiths: Thanks to the stunning performance of Michael Phelps, an amazing accomplishment will now be known as a "Phelpsian Feat." Fellow swimmer Aaron Piersol coined the term, thinking "Spitzian," which used to mean the same thing, was as passe as Mark Spitz's ample '70s mustache. One could say it's all but Phelpsian, how fast the new word has slipped into the lexicon.
SPORTS
By The Denver Post | August 16, 2008
BEIJING - They are both tied to the number seven, as in medals. They both swam six of the same events and set world records in all of them. They were both the talk of the sporting world. Yet one is tall and ripped; one was shorter and sinewy. One is modest; one was cocky. One looks bad in a mustache; one looked good. Michael Phelps has won seven gold medals at these Beijing Olympics, tying Mark Spitz's unheard-of record in the 1972 Munich Olympics. But it has been 36 years since Spitz last entered competition.
NEWS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | August 16, 2008
BEIJING - So much history can be decided by fractions of a second in swimming. But never in the history of the sport has so much been at stake with so little time as there was today in the 100-meter butterfly. Michael Phelps should not have won. It looked, from every angle, like he did not win. But somehow, by one-hundredth of a second, he did. In what will almost certainly go down as the most dramatic - and perhaps most controversial - race of Phelps' career, the Rodgers Forge native out-touched Serbia's Milorad Cavic to win his seventh gold medal.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Sun reporter | August 16, 2008
BEIJING - It's easy to feel awed when you're watching history unfold. Michael Phelps has reminded us of that so many times this week, stringing together seven remarkable races that have been thrilling, entertaining and nerve-racking. What's less easy is putting it all into immediate historical perspective. Phelps earned a $1 million bonus today from Speedo by tying Mark Spitz's record for most gold medals in a single Olympics. He'll have a chance to win his eighth tomorrow in the medley relay.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | August 13, 2008
More than three decades ago, Mark Spitz was the American super-athlete with enough gold hanging around his neck to qualify him for his own safety deposit box at Fort Knox. Today, the former swimming star, 58, who captured seven golds at the 1972 Summer Games in Munich sounds a little curmudgeonly as he complains that no one has invited him to Beijing to preside as the swimming god emeritus while Michael Phelps carries the standard for America. "I never got invited," Spitz was quoted as saying.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | July 6, 2008
Omaha, Neb. -- And now the race is on. They've leapt from the starting blocks. In one lane, expectations. In another, hope. And in a third, speculation. Since Michael Phelps left Athens four years ago with six gold medals in his carry-on luggage, the assumption had been that he would earn more at the 2008 Games. But it wasn't until last night that we knew for certain he would even have the chance. His easy win in the 100-meter butterfly last night locked up his fifth individual win at the U.S. Olympic trials.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
When Ellen Handler Spitz was 8 years old, her mother arranged for her visually attuned daughter to spend each Saturday in the studio of a local female sculptor. Though the child had access to modeling clay and tools, the sculptor left her alone. Side by side, each worked on her own projects. "I was allowed and even, as I realize now, expected to become completely absorbed in my work," Spitz writes in her new book, The Brightening Glance. When her mother arrived to pick her up at the end of each session, "her sudden appearance felt like an electric shock ... which I experienced rather like awakening from a daydream, when you cannot believe time has actually elapsed."
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | July 6, 2008
Omaha, Neb. -- And now the race is on. They've leapt from the starting blocks. In one lane, expectations. In another, hope. And in a third, speculation. Since Michael Phelps left Athens four years ago with six gold medals in his carry-on luggage, the assumption had been that he would earn more at the 2008 Games. But it wasn't until last night that we knew for certain he would even have the chance. His easy win in the 100-meter butterfly last night locked up his fifth individual win at the U.S. Olympic trials.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 3, 2007
INDIANAPOLIS -- Under his skull-tight swim cap, you can't really tell much about Michael Phelps' training. But under his Detroit Tigers ball cap, you can see his hair sprouting out like a well-watered houseplant. It's a subtle thing, but it tells us where Phelps is in his preparation for the Beijing Olympics. "When he gets really serious, that'll be gone," promises Phelps' coach, Bob Bowman. ConocoPhillips USA Swimming National Championships Through tomorrow, Indianapolis Today: Katie Hoff and Kate Ziegler swim the 200 free; Michael Phelps shoots for an upset win in the 100 backstroke.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
When Ellen Handler Spitz was 8 years old, her mother arranged for her visually attuned daughter to spend each Saturday in the studio of a local female sculptor. Though the child had access to modeling clay and tools, the sculptor left her alone. Side by side, each worked on her own projects. "I was allowed and even, as I realize now, expected to become completely absorbed in my work," Spitz writes in her new book, The Brightening Glance. When her mother arrived to pick her up at the end of each session, "her sudden appearance felt like an electric shock ... which I experienced rather like awakening from a daydream, when you cannot believe time has actually elapsed."
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