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By Lyle V. Harris and Lyle V. Harris,Cox News Service | March 14, 1999
SILVER SPRING -- On the second floor of a drab red-brick building just outside Washington, spiritual guru Iyanla Vanzant is the picture of serene success.Vanzant's office at the Inner Visions Spiritual Maintenance Center is swathed in soothing purples. Music inspired by the I Ching thrums from a bookshelf stereo. And Vanzant's warming herself with a cup of herbal tea.She seems perfectly at peace, and why not? She's a regular on TV's "The Oprah Winfrey Show," Hallmark has turned her daily affirmations into a line of greeting cards, and her string of best sellers includes "Acts of Faith," a book many loyal readers call the black woman's bible.
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NEWS
By Yuwei Zhang | July 13, 2014
Marching in an Independence Day Parade is not supposed to be a gut-wrenching experience, but for me last weekend in Philadelphia, it was. Don't get me wrong; I love playing my waist drum, in my waist-drum troupe. It's just that July 4th always triggers memories of the day I left behind my husband and child in China, to escape to America. I recall secretly wiping away my tears so that my mom wouldn't see the depth of my sadness. I told my 1-month-old daughter, who was fast asleep, "I promise you a bright future, but for now, mommy has to leave you here in China.
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NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | July 20, 2008
Summer often brings vacation days, trips to flee the routine and extra "me" time. It can be a season to rest the body. It also can be a time to renew the mind and refresh the spirit - through reading. But where to start? Here are some suggestions. Gandhi, the Man: The Story of His Transformation by Eknath Easwaran Nilgiri Press / 1997 / $16 paperback This is a fairly short and easy-to-read book, with lots of pictures and stories, but it is loaded with spiritual wisdom and power. In showing how Gandhi got to be such a great spiritual being, it inspires its readers to some of the same greatness.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 12, 2014
Frank Sinatra's song about Chicago, "My Kind of Town," "a the town that won't let you down," seems dated in light of last weekend's shooting spree that left 16 dead and dozens wounded in 53 separate incidents. According to the Chicago Tribune, "The victims were among 82 people shot between Thursday afternoon and early Monday. "   Chicago wasn't alone in the Independence Day violence. New York City and Detroit combined for 10 dead in 46 shootings, but let's stick with Chicago where violence in mainly poor African-American and Hispanic neighborhoods has become a way of death.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | July 6, 1993
She's made a living -- and a bundle -- out of talking about miracles. Now Marianne Williamson, best-selling author and spiritual friend of the stars, is embarking on a mission that is truly miraculous: She wants to change American politics."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 12, 1994
The earth does not belong to man, man belongs to the earth."So wrote Chief Seattle of the Suquamish Indians in a moving 1852 letter to the United States government, which had proposed to buy land from his people. "All things are connected like the blood that unites us all. Man did not weave the web of life, he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web he does to himself."Those words of almost a century and a half ago could stand as the theme of "Rejoining the Spiritual: The Land in Contemporary Latin American Art," an exhibition at the Maryland Institute consisting of seven installations by Latin American artists living in the United States.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville and Frank P. L. Somerville,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1994
As Christians and Jews explored the heights and depths of spirituality together under the dome of a big synagogue in Pikesville, questions, doubts and parables were the shared road signs.Wednesday night's discussions were part of a two-day program of the Pearlstone Institute for Living Judaism.The Rev. Christopher Leighton, director of the Institute for Christian-Jewish Studies, which co-sponsored the event, said such cooperative spiritual programs help people of different faiths bring "order out of chaos" as they "face the rage of a Louis Farrakhan or a Baruch Goldstein."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 25, 2001
The state fire marshal's office has determined a fire Saturday morning that caused about $300,000 in damage to Our Lady Center Inc., a spiritual retreat center in Ellicott City, began accidentally, investigators said yesterday. Fire investigators believe candles left burning after a 9:30 p.m. service ignited combustible materials near the altar. Howard County firefighters found the chapel, in the 3300 block of Rogers Ave., in flames when they arrived about 4 a.m. Saturday. Our Lady Center has no regular congregation, said Madeline Lancelotta, 86, whose husband, Frank Lancelotta, donated land for the center in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | July 14, 2005
EVEN IF ONE believes, as I do, that the urgent moral danger to America has arisen from the conservative side of the political divide, it's important to ask how one's own side may have contributed to the present crisis. Take, for example, the failure of American liberalism to present its message in a way that resonates at a deep level. For many Americans, it's not enough that the trains run on time, that the bureaucracies administer their programs, that America just be an address at which they live their private lives.
NEWS
By VICKI WELLFORD | June 7, 1994
St. Joseph's Church of Odenton will join other churches in the Archdiocese of Baltimore in RENEW, an international spiritual program.This 2 1/2 -year program will give Christians of all denominations an opportunity to evaluate the spiritual aspects of their lives and become more aware of their gifts and talents, said the Rev. John Harrison.Participants in RENEW will take part in five six-week sessions in the fall and during Lent, with each session having a comprehensive theme.Leaders of RENEW hope to foster a vibrant spiritual community and become more involved in social action.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | April 29, 2014
Everybody needs to recharge their batteries once in a while - to get away, slow down, take a few deep breaths. But not everybody wants to do it the same way. Some want to be pampered in luxury. Others would rather wander through wooded trails. Others could think of nothing better than guided spiritual retreat with like-minded pilgrims. Fortunately, you can find any of these options in Howard County, where a variety of facilities offer an array of retreat spaces for the weary, burned-out seeker of solace.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
In response to former Mayor Sheila Dixon's letter ( "Sheila Dixon: Baltimore isn't perfect but it's getting better," March 11), I beg to differ that we are better off today than in 2000. In 2000, Baltimore's gangs weren't as organized as we see them today. The anti-establishment they preach is a cancer to all the good works that are put into effect to help our people. Their mentally truly undermines unity of all people. I live in East Baltimore and grew up in Cherry Hill. What I see now is far more dangerous then what I came from.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Since becoming music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 2007, Marin Alsop has typically devised a theme of some kind to unify each season. For 2014-2015, the theme is "spirituality and transcendence. " "I started talking about a few pieces, like Beethoven's Ninth, Bernstein's 'Candide,' and some Mahler, and the theme seemed to evolve without forcing," Alsop said.    Fitting that theme will be such works as Mahler's Symphony No 3, with its last movement "pointing the way to God," as the composer put it; and Symphony No. 4, which ends with a song evoking a child's view of heaven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Vaddey Ratner didn't expect much when she first took on the project of writing a novel about a young Cambodian girl and her family who are forced into the countryside by the Khmer Rouge as part of the communist group's program of genocide that began in 1975. It was just something that she needed to do. "I sat down to write as an act of mourning the ghosts and spirits, honoring those lost lives," she explains. "In the Shadow of the Banyan," Ratner's first novel, is based on her experiences as a child.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Because the Baltimore-area novelist Alice McDermott possesses a painterly eye that delights in the way things look and sound and smell and taste, it can be easy to miss her underlying focus. For the National Book Award-winning author, each small sensory jolt that originates in this world is a gateway to a more incorporeal realm. "Marie takes a spiritual journey in this novel," McDermott says of the heroine of her newly released book, "Someone: A Novel. " "She goes from not understanding at all to not quite understanding to understanding a little bit. Early in the book, her brother makes an absolutely outrageous proposition from the Gospel of Matthew, that all the hairs on our heads are counted and that we're not alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
As afternoon light tried to filter through the thick, stained-glass windows of Sharp Street United Methodist Church last weekend, Marco K. Merrick pounded out the bass line of a spiritual on a raw-sounding piano, singing along in a raspy voice: "Great day, the righteous marching. Great day, God's going to build up Zion's walls. " From the tightly packed pews in front of him, basses and baritones of the Community Concert Choir of Baltimore picked up the vocal line tentatively at first, but gained in confidence with each measure.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
As members of the Pan Africa Christian Women Alliance filed out of the conference room at Western Maryland College, Mary O. Nasibi sang softly to them."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
While their classmates cavort on Christmas break, more than 500 college students are gathering this weekend at a Baltimore-area hotel, studying the Bible and talking about their love for Jesus. The annual Christmas Conference for Campus Crusade for Christ, a nondenominational Christian ministry active at more than 1,300 colleges and universities nationwide, is drawing students from the mid-Atlantic region for a three-day meeting at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. It is one of nine such conferences taking place this weekend nationwide.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
He pulled on a Terps visor, to the crowd's delight. He rubbed noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley. And the Dalai Lama was met Tuesday with rounds of applause from a crowd of 15,000 at the University of Maryland, College Park's Comcast Center. "Sit down," the 78-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader said in a firm but friendly voice when he approached the podium and the crowd rose to its feet. "No formality! We are [the] same. … The way we are born, the way we die: no formality. " Clad in red robes and his trademark spectacles, the Dalai Lama appeared at the university to give an address on peace, compassion and fellowship as part of the Anwar Sadat Lecture Series.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader for Tibetan Buddhists, will speak in May at the University of Maryland as part of the Sadat Lecture for Peace, an annual series that has drawn world leaders such as Madeleine Albright, Nelson Mandela and Jimmy Carter. The event will be held at 10 a.m. May 7 at the Comcast Center on the College Park campus. Tickets are free but required. "It is very important that we expose our students to the broadest cultural and international diversity possible, and help them become global citizens," University of Maryland President Wallace Loh said in a statement.
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