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By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
Novelist Madison Smartt Bell and poet Elizabeth Spires have performed plenty of readings over the more than 20 years they have been publishing their writing. The Baltimore authors, who are married, have even shared the bill a few times. And, with their diverse interests and evolving styles, they keep finding new things to offer audiences. When they appear Oct. 18 at Howard Community College to open the 29th year of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society (HoCoPoLitSo), Bell will play guitar and sing to accompany readings from his most recent novel, published this year.
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NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Treasure in the Cellar Leonard Augsburger Maryland Historical Society / 207 pages / $26 Two poor teenagers made headlines in 1934 when they found a pot of gold coins while playing in the cellar of 132 S. Eden St. The teens, Henry Grob and Theodore Jones, decided to do the right thing. They took the coins to the Eastern District police, who locked the coins in the safe until "the legal tangles were ironed out." That was a big mistake, according to Leonard Augsburger's historical account, Treasure in the Cellar.
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NEWS
December 9, 2003
KATHRYN S. ENGLAR of Myrtle Beach, SC died December 6, 2003 in SC. Born February 5, 1921, in Ohio, daughter of the late Ernie and Ethel Coldiron Spires. Member of the Women's Club and volunteer with the American Cancer Society, American Heart Assoc. and a hospital volunteer all in Pikesville, MD. Preceded in death by husband Jack. Surviving are daughters and husbands, Carol and Gerald Diehl of York, PA and Sharon and Chuck Derickson of North Myrtle Beach, SC; sons and wives, Robert and Sandy Englar of Marietta, GA, John and Linda Englar of Greensboro, NC and Richard and Jill Englar of Finksburg, MD; twelve grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; brothers, Charles "Ernie" Spires and Keith Spires both of Portsmouth, OH and sisters, Audrey Fannin of Akron, OH, Jean Griffith and Joy Spires both of Portsmouth, OH. Memorials may be made to the American Diabetes Assoc.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
The poet Josephine Jacobsen, in an essay she wrote for The Sun almost 30 years ago, decried how hard it was to get inside things that should be easy to open (milk cartons, aspirin bottles), yet how quickly Americans seemed to expect personal intimacy. Friendship, the Baltimore native wrote in her elegant way, should be a matter of "gradation - the stages by which acquaintance becomes congeniality, congeniality becomes intimacy. ... It is the flowering of long preparation." Jacobsen, the celebrated author of nine books of verse who once served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (a position later renamed U.S. Poet Laureate)
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Treasure in the Cellar Leonard Augsburger Maryland Historical Society / 207 pages / $26 Two poor teenagers made headlines in 1934 when they found a pot of gold coins while playing in the cellar of 132 S. Eden St. The teens, Henry Grob and Theodore Jones, decided to do the right thing. They took the coins to the Eastern District police, who locked the coins in the safe until "the legal tangles were ironed out." That was a big mistake, according to Leonard Augsburger's historical account, Treasure in the Cellar.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
The poet Josephine Jacobsen, in an essay she wrote for The Sun almost 30 years ago, decried how hard it was to get inside things that should be easy to open (milk cartons, aspirin bottles), yet how quickly Americans seemed to expect personal intimacy. Friendship, the Baltimore native wrote in her elegant way, should be a matter of "gradation - the stages by which acquaintance becomes congeniality, congeniality becomes intimacy. ... It is the flowering of long preparation." Jacobsen, the celebrated author of nine books of verse who once served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (a position later renamed U.S. Poet Laureate)
NEWS
By MIKE FARABAUGH and MIKE FARABAUGH,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Jamie Lynn Spealman-Black 17 died Wednesday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries suffered in a single-car crash Sunday near her Hampstead home, Maryland State Police said yesterday. Lt. Terry Katz, commander at the Westminster barracks of the state police, said Ms. Spealman-Black was traveling north on Route 30 near Basler Road about 6:30 a.m. when her 1987 Mercury Sable crossed the southbound lane and struck a tree head-on. "The roadway was wet, but there were no witnesses to the accident," Lieutenant Katz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier | October 13, 2002
The poet William Meredith once said in an interview that he would wait "until the poems seem to be addressed not to 'Occupant' but to 'William Meredith' " before writing. This careful, patient and proprietary way of working is evident in some of the best poets of the last century, including Louise Bogan, Philip Larkin, Elizabeth Bishop, and Donald Justice to name a few. Like these poets, Elizabeth Spires makes sure the muse has the right name and address before committing her words to the page.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood | December 21, 1995
Frederick's famed spiresThe "clustered spires of Frederick" noted in the Whittier poem "Barbara Fritchie" have long been a landmark in Frederick. Here's an opportunity to visit these churches and others during the annual Candlelight Tour of Historic Houses of Worship on Dec. 26 from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.The self-guided tour has become a popular family event during the holiday season in Frederick, which is celebrating its 250th birthday.Each of the 16 decorated sites will be lighted by luminarias, and a host will be on hand to answer questions, as will costumed tour guides.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Spires and Elizabeth Spires,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
Editor's note: Baltimore poet and Goucher College professor Elizabeth Spires wrote this tribute to Josephine Jacobsen in The Sun on the occasion of her 90th birthday in 1998. Spires edited The Instant of Knowing (University of Michigan Press, 1997), a collection of Jacobsen's writing. Spires' poem for Jacobsen, "In Heaven It Is Always Autumn," follows. Poets, as Josephine Jacobsen suggests in her 1980 essay "Artifacts of Memory," are archaeologists. They mine the past and make connections to the present.
NEWS
December 9, 2003
KATHRYN S. ENGLAR of Myrtle Beach, SC died December 6, 2003 in SC. Born February 5, 1921, in Ohio, daughter of the late Ernie and Ethel Coldiron Spires. Member of the Women's Club and volunteer with the American Cancer Society, American Heart Assoc. and a hospital volunteer all in Pikesville, MD. Preceded in death by husband Jack. Surviving are daughters and husbands, Carol and Gerald Diehl of York, PA and Sharon and Chuck Derickson of North Myrtle Beach, SC; sons and wives, Robert and Sandy Englar of Marietta, GA, John and Linda Englar of Greensboro, NC and Richard and Jill Englar of Finksburg, MD; twelve grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; brothers, Charles "Ernie" Spires and Keith Spires both of Portsmouth, OH and sisters, Audrey Fannin of Akron, OH, Jean Griffith and Joy Spires both of Portsmouth, OH. Memorials may be made to the American Diabetes Assoc.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Spires and Elizabeth Spires,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
Editor's note: Baltimore poet and Goucher College professor Elizabeth Spires wrote this tribute to Josephine Jacobsen in The Sun on the occasion of her 90th birthday in 1998. Spires edited The Instant of Knowing (University of Michigan Press, 1997), a collection of Jacobsen's writing. Spires' poem for Jacobsen, "In Heaven It Is Always Autumn," follows. Poets, as Josephine Jacobsen suggests in her 1980 essay "Artifacts of Memory," are archaeologists. They mine the past and make connections to the present.
NEWS
By Josh Getlin and Suzanne Muchnic and Josh Getlin and Suzanne Muchnic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
NEW YORK - A soaring spire, angular office buildings and a deep pit marking the foundation of the World Trade Center was chosen last night as the winning design for a major rebuilding of the site, according to sources familiar with the decision quoted in news reports. Ending an intense, monthlong competition between two teams of world-renowned architects, a blue ribbon panel selected the Studio Daniel Libeskind plan for the site over the offering by the THINK group led by Rafael Vinoly and Frederic Schwartz.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
Baltimore City Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh attracted a small crowd last week for a public hearing on a resolution to find ways to promote a better image of the city. A former college professor showed up with an idea for "entrepreneurship education" in the public schools. A guitarist for a local band named Fitehouse made an appearance to tout his very own rock 'n' roll anthem for Baltimore. But also seated in a dark row of vacant seats, waiting to speak, was David Simon, celebrated producer and writer for such Baltimore-based crime dramas as Homicide, The Wire and The Corner - the very kinds of programs Pugh feared were sullying the image of Charm City, the same dramas her resolution sought, in her words, to "counteract."
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2002
A gold-plated cross atop a tall brick Baptist Church at a crossroads in the East Baltimore community of Oliver was illuminated for the first time last night -- marking the first flash of Mayor Martin O'Malley's new Inspire Baltimore initiative. "It's my vision come true that the cross would be lit," said the Rev. James J. Thompson, 68, the pastor of Nazarene Baptist Church in the 1200 block of Harford Ave. where it meets East Biddle and Aisquith streets. "Lo and behold, my prayers have been answered."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier | October 13, 2002
The poet William Meredith once said in an interview that he would wait "until the poems seem to be addressed not to 'Occupant' but to 'William Meredith' " before writing. This careful, patient and proprietary way of working is evident in some of the best poets of the last century, including Louise Bogan, Philip Larkin, Elizabeth Bishop, and Donald Justice to name a few. Like these poets, Elizabeth Spires makes sure the muse has the right name and address before committing her words to the page.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2002
Baltimore City Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh attracted a small crowd last week for a public hearing on a resolution to find ways to promote a better image of the city. A former college professor showed up with an idea for "entrepreneurship education" in the public schools. A guitarist for a local band named Fitehouse made an appearance to tout his very own rock 'n' roll anthem for Baltimore. But also seated in a dark row of vacant seats, waiting to speak, was David Simon, celebrated producer and writer for such Baltimore-based crime dramas as Homicide, The Wire and The Corner - the very kinds of programs Pugh feared were sullying the image of Charm City, the same dramas her resolution sought, in her words, to "counteract."
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
A 1989 dream became a 1992 reality Friday with the grand opening of Clustered Spires Golf Course, a municipal facility on the outskirts of Frederick.The historical significance of the occasion was not lost on the assembly, as the city has ties to the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and "the clustered spires of Fredericktown" were immortalized in John Greenleaf Whittier's poem, "Barbara Fritchie."In addition, the course lies next to the Monocacy River, which has been declared a "scenic river," and, as such, required environmental sensitivity on the part of the architects, Ault, Clark and Associates, and the builder, First Golf Corporation, of Denver.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2002
Novelist Madison Smartt Bell and poet Elizabeth Spires have performed plenty of readings over the more than 20 years they have been publishing their writing. The Baltimore authors, who are married, have even shared the bill a few times. And, with their diverse interests and evolving styles, they keep finding new things to offer audiences. When they appear Oct. 18 at Howard Community College to open the 29th year of the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society (HoCoPoLitSo), Bell will play guitar and sing to accompany readings from his most recent novel, published this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff | September 2, 2001
Madison Smartt Bell begins the first session of English 306 at Goucher College by drawing two curved, symmetrical objects. He renders these deflated ovals with precise, exacting strokes. His students, however, don't have a clue what he's trying to show them. "Lungs?" is the first tentative guess. No. "Two chili peppers?" Nope. "A pair of squashes?" Uh-uh. The students are stumped. They know the objects must somehow be related to the ostensible subject at hand, creative writing. But until they solve the mystery of the ellipses, there will be no talk of writing, not overtly.
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