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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Chris Mason-Hale vividly remembers the football play that changed his life. The scene rolls through his mind with the same detail as the action movies he watches on his portable DVD player at Kernan Hospital. A senior linebacker for Western Tech in Catonsville, Mason-Hale went for a routine tackle in the final scrimmage of the preseason, Aug. 29 at Northeast. "It was a dive," Mason-Hale said of the common short-yardage play. "They gave the running back the ball, and he came through the one hole.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Sometimes, late at night, Glennae Williams is startled awake by a crash. "Are you ok, Ma?" she calls to her mother. Her mother, DaVeeda White, has fallen again. She gets up to use the bathroom and her legs collapse, just as they have been collapsing since Glennae was a little girl. "I'm on the floor," White calls back. She knows her daughter will come. These are not the kinds of nights one associates with the last exhausted, exuberant, anxious weeks of college. Williams stays up late cramming for finals and fretting about grades, then rushes off to work in the morning.
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NEWS
July 12, 2008
A national drag-racing league announced yesterday that it has donated $60,000 worth of tickets to the Kennedy Krieger Institute's spinal cord injury center to help the Baltimore facility raise money. The American Drag Racing League gave 2,000 tickets to the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury for the league's July 25-26 event at Maryland International Raceway in Mechanicsville. The tickets typically sell for $30, but the spinal cord center is selling them for $10. Dr. John W. McDonald, director of the center, said in a statement that such private donations are "critically important" to help the center develop therapies to help people recover from paralysis.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 2, 2013
Speaking for the first time since suffering a spinal cord contusion on Dec. 9, inside linebacker Jameel McClain said he is feeling better. “I feel good,” he said prior to Wednesday's practice. “… Now we're just resting like always, resting right now and trying to recover completely. But if you ask me, I could go tackle someone right now. But it's not in my hands.” McClain sustained the injury while trying to tackle Washington Redskins rookie running back Alfred Morris late in the third quarter of the Ravens' eventual 31-28 overtime loss.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
Chris Mason-Hale vividly remembers the football play that changed his life. The scene rolls through his mind with the same detail as the action movies he watches on his portable DVD player at Kernan Hospital. A senior linebacker for Western Tech in Catonsville, Mason-Hale went for a routine tackle in the final scrimmage of the preseason, Aug. 29 at Northeast. "It was a dive," Mason-Hale said of the common short-yardage play. "They gave the running back the ball, and he came through the one hole.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,edward.lee@baltsun.com | September 23, 2008
Strong safety Dawan Landry was released from Maryland Shock Trauma Center and is expected to return to the field this season after suffering a spinal cord concussion in the second quarter of Sunday's 28-10 win against the Cleveland Browns. "His stability tests are all normal," coach John Harbaugh said. "He will be in a cervical collar for at least a week, and then they'll evaluate him further and then we'll just take it from there. He'll be playing in some number of weeks, and it won't be too many weeks."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
A foot and half separated Marc Burleson from the buried bomb he was trying to defuse last December in a narrow alleyway of a small Afghanistan village. The bomb exploded, mutilating the Marine's face, ripping off part of his right arm, paralyzing his left arm, blinding him in one eye and leaving him unconscious for nearly a month. Burleson, a 31-year-old Texan, finally awoke to a pain he never imagined could exist. An excruciating burning sensation came from the paralyzed left arm — a pain that overpowered any of the hurt he felt from his other injuries.
SPORTS
By Chris Foster and Chris Foster,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 11, 2005
LOS ANGELES - Al Lucas, a lineman for the Los Angeles Avengers, died yesterday afternoon after suffering an apparent spinal cord injury while trying to make a tackle early in the Arena Football League team's game at Staples Center, officials said. Lucas, 26, was injured on a kickoff return five minutes into the game against the New York Dragons. He was pronounced dead at California Hospital after attempts to revive him at the arena and hospital failed. He is the first player in the Arena Football League's 20-year history to die during a game.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,sun columnist | September 25, 2005
Van Brooks Jr. remembers just about everything about the toughest day of his life. For some, purging the memory of something as traumatic as being paralyzed making a tackle might be first on a to-do list, but every detail of that warm fall day is burnished on Brooks' mind. "I remember everything," Brooks said the other day. "I remember making the tackle. I remember laying there and not being able to feel anything. I remember talking to the trainer, who was asking me different questions.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Roch Eric Kubatko and Gary Lambrecht and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
A magnetic resonance imaging exam has revealed that Ravens offensive lineman Herman Arvie suffered a small contusion on his spinal cord in the closing moments of Sunday's 21-14 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals.Ravens trainer Bill Tessendorf said Arvie will have another MRI on Friday, and added that he is not expected to play against the Carolina Panthers on Sunday. Arvie could be out for the rest of the season."We're in a wait-and-see mode as far as the rest of the season for him, but everything is normal.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Erin Michael ran the relay race in the Baltimore Running Festival last year and saw a few disabled racers — but thought there could be more. The 29-year-old therapist at Kennedy Krieger Institute encouraged and then helped train nine patients who finished the race Saturday. Michael ran the 5K, then raced back a mile to watch her proteges. "I was moved to tears during what was one of the proudest moments of my life," she said. "I saw several walking to the finish line and one rolling by on his bike.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
A foot and half separated Marc Burleson from the buried bomb he was trying to defuse last December in a narrow alleyway of a small Afghanistan village. The bomb exploded, mutilating the Marine's face, ripping off part of his right arm, paralyzing his left arm, blinding him in one eye and leaving him unconscious for nearly a month. Burleson, a 31-year-old Texan, finally awoke to a pain he never imagined could exist. An excruciating burning sensation came from the paralyzed left arm — a pain that overpowered any of the hurt he felt from his other injuries.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2011
In May, Chris Mason-Hale posted a photo on his Facebook page of himself standing during a break from therapy at the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Looking all of his 6 feet 4 with arms crossed and head slightly back, his body language and proud grin seemed to exude a so-you-thought-I'd-never-walk-again dare. After the former Western Tech linebacker suffered a paralyzing spinal cord injury in a scrimmage nearly three years ago, walking under even a little of his own power was never a certainty.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Dr. Kenneth F. Spence Jr., a highly regarded Baltimore orthopedic surgeon who was a Vietnam War veteran, died Monday of leukemia at Hooper House Hospice in Forest Hill. The longtime Columbia resident was 79. The son of a civil engineer and a homemaker, Dr. Spence was born and raised in Hagerstown, where he was a 1949 graduate of Hagerstown High School. After graduating from what is now Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va., in 1953, he enrolled at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he earned a medical degree in 1957.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
Archbishop Spalding junior first baseman Nick Freeberger sits on a dugout bench. The evening sun is shining on his boyish face, and he smiles. It has been a good day. He helped his No. 2 Cavaliers to victory with a three-run home run. That would be enough to make most high school baseball players grin, but there is more behind this display of happiness than a single game. To look at him now, no one would suspect that a little more than a month ago, screws were ground into his head for a halo to support a broken neck, and that the chances of his playing baseball this season or perhaps ever were in doubt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 1, 2010
Louise B. McKnew, a lawyer who was a champion of spinal cord injury patients and founder of the National Research Institute for Neural Injury, died Tuesday from complications of pneumonia at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The Pasadena resident was 71. Louise Bouscaren was born in Greenwich, Conn., and raised in Baltimore and Ruxton. She was a 1956 graduate of Garrison Forest School and attended Wheaton College in Norton, Mass., until she left to get married. After raising her family, Mrs. McKnew returned to college and earned a bachelor's degree in 1975 from American University.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
Of all the injuries Earl Moncrieff suffered in the terrible, head-on car collision, the trauma to his left hand was the worst. The throbbing, constant pain often crescendoed without warning, as if someone had suddenly banged his hand with a sledgehammer. Years after the crash, he would cry out and drop to his knees in the middle of the supermarket.But there was one problem that prevented doctors from treating him: Moncrieff no longer had a left hand.Along with much of his left arm, it had been all but severed in the accident.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 2, 2013
Speaking for the first time since suffering a spinal cord contusion on Dec. 9, inside linebacker Jameel McClain said he is feeling better. “I feel good,” he said prior to Wednesday's practice. “… Now we're just resting like always, resting right now and trying to recover completely. But if you ask me, I could go tackle someone right now. But it's not in my hands.” McClain sustained the injury while trying to tackle Washington Redskins rookie running back Alfred Morris late in the third quarter of the Ravens' eventual 31-28 overtime loss.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
- Tight end has never been an easy position for NFL scouts to evaluate. The skills required to play it at a high level simply don't mesh that often in one body. There are scores of big, tall guys with soft hands who can't block, and plenty of lumbering, rhinoceros-size blockers who simply can't run or catch. And finding one with the right blend of the two strengths has become that much harder in recent years because fewer and fewer high school and college teams are using tight ends in their spread offenses.
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