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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 1997
We went expecting mushrooms, but at Port O Bella's, the emphasis is definitely on the port -- the port of Baltimore. This newest offering from Jennifer Moeller Price, executive chef and co-owner of the Wild Mushroom and the Wild Mushroom Merchant, is a casual open-air bar and cafe, set smack on the water in Canton.Oh, there are mushrooms, to be sure -- grilled on skewers and roasted on hoagies. A saucer-size portobello served as a plate for hot crab dip that was spiked with cheese but skimpy on crab.
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FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
It really is the most wonderful time of the year: check your guest list twice, deck your halls and prepare to celebrate straight through to the New Year. Whatever your holiday traditions - Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Las Posadas - it's the season for parties that many experts say are less about outdated "rules" and more about embracing your own personal style. "My recipe for a great holiday party is ambience - it starts when you walk in," says Elle Ellinghaus of Elle Designs, whose Canton-based boutique firm planned the summer nuptials of Ravens player Torrey Smith and his bride.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2008
Fins on the Square takes over the old Rick's Cafe Americain space on Canton Square from Granite Bar and Grille, which tried to make it with a (tired) industrial theme, a concept that lasted less than two years. Fins, under the same ownership, is going with a beach club theme - it looks like a Jimmy Buffett concert exploded in there. It's just as random, but seems like a much better fit for the neighborhood. There was a lively happy-hour crowd at the bar when we visited on a weeknight, and Fins was feeling less like a fourth-choice-on-the-square place than Granite ever did. The airy interior space is evenly divided between the entrance-side bar and the dining room, and on a recent late-summer evening, the large front windows on both sides were open to the breeze.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Well, the quinoa salad was a hit at the garden party. I think. At least the bowl ended up empty, which is great because my refrigerator is stuffed with greens and with leftovers. One thing I realized today: I can keep up with making a dish every day (maybe) but usually there are also leftovers, too. My husband was heading out the door to work out today and mentioned that he might "grab something for lunch" and I told him that really, that might not be okay today -- or for the rest of the summer.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 27, 1991
Oysters taste better as the weather gets colder. A Chesapeake Bay waterman told me that once, and I have since accepted it as gospel. I believe almost anything that the guys who catch oysters tell me about the mollusks.I believe, for instance, that oysters "plump up after a good frost." That the "r" months, ones with the letter "r" in their names, are the prime time to feed on oysters. That you don't want to eat oysters and ice cream at the same meal, because the ice cream will turn the oysters into stone in your stomach.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | July 23, 1992
I had waited years to go to The Milton Inn. It's one of those venerable places that crops up in almost every conversation about the area's best restaurants -- best special occasion, fancy, expensive restaurants, that is. And with its name are always accolades about beautiful atmosphere, exquisite food, memorable evenings.So, I went recently -- with a reservation made three weeks in advance -- with great anticipation.I think it was too much anticipation. This was clearly a case of getting there being at least half the fun.Don't get me wrong.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2004
This could be a first - a place that plays country music and uses sun-dried tomatoes, fried leek sticks and pesto mayonnaise. Welcome to the Carried Away Gourmet. Located on Main Street in the heart of old Bel Air, Carried Away is a surprisingly good carryout that is interested in being far more than a BLT-slinging eatery. The country music notwithstanding, the owners have done up the inside of the old brick storefront with an urban sensibility: polished wood floors, cute light fixtures and a color scheme heavy on mustard and mauve.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
Well, the quinoa salad was a hit at the garden party. I think. At least the bowl ended up empty, which is great because my refrigerator is stuffed with greens and with leftovers. One thing I realized today: I can keep up with making a dish every day (maybe) but usually there are also leftovers, too. My husband was heading out the door to work out today and mentioned that he might "grab something for lunch" and I told him that really, that might not be okay today -- or for the rest of the summer.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
It really is the most wonderful time of the year: check your guest list twice, deck your halls and prepare to celebrate straight through to the New Year. Whatever your holiday traditions - Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Las Posadas - it's the season for parties that many experts say are less about outdated "rules" and more about embracing your own personal style. "My recipe for a great holiday party is ambience - it starts when you walk in," says Elle Ellinghaus of Elle Designs, whose Canton-based boutique firm planned the summer nuptials of Ravens player Torrey Smith and his bride.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE United Feature Syndicate | February 4, 1996
Scallops are a handy tool for the cook in a hurry: the plump, meaty bivalves come already shucked, and they need only minutes to cook. The bright flavors in the main dish pair well with the deeper notes in a spinach salad tossed with a black-olive vinaigrette. A warm loaf of crusty Italian bread balances all.Fusilli with scallops and fennelServes 41 large fennel bulb with feathery tops3/4 pound spinach or plain fusilli or rotini1 tablespoon olive oil1 clove garlic, finely chopped1 pound bay or sea scallops, halved or quartered if large1 tablespoon Pernod or other anise-flavored liquor1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice2 teaspoons grated lemon zestsalt and freshly ground black pepper to taste1.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2008
Fins on the Square takes over the old Rick's Cafe Americain space on Canton Square from Granite Bar and Grille, which tried to make it with a (tired) industrial theme, a concept that lasted less than two years. Fins, under the same ownership, is going with a beach club theme - it looks like a Jimmy Buffett concert exploded in there. It's just as random, but seems like a much better fit for the neighborhood. There was a lively happy-hour crowd at the bar when we visited on a weeknight, and Fins was feeling less like a fourth-choice-on-the-square place than Granite ever did. The airy interior space is evenly divided between the entrance-side bar and the dining room, and on a recent late-summer evening, the large front windows on both sides were open to the breeze.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 2004
This could be a first - a place that plays country music and uses sun-dried tomatoes, fried leek sticks and pesto mayonnaise. Welcome to the Carried Away Gourmet. Located on Main Street in the heart of old Bel Air, Carried Away is a surprisingly good carryout that is interested in being far more than a BLT-slinging eatery. The country music notwithstanding, the owners have done up the inside of the old brick storefront with an urban sensibility: polished wood floors, cute light fixtures and a color scheme heavy on mustard and mauve.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
For a light lunch that can be made ahead and transported, try a salad of tender baby spinach leaves, carrot ribbons and sliced green onions tossed in a light sesame and wine vinegar dressing. Pick up a roasted chicken and slice its breast meat to add to the salad. Sprinkle the salad with crispy fried ginger chips. To serve with it, a crusty baguette is perfect, and for dessert, pick up a pint of grapefruit sorbet and a basket of fresh blueberries. The delectable ginger chips are what make this salad distinctive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 1997
We went expecting mushrooms, but at Port O Bella's, the emphasis is definitely on the port -- the port of Baltimore. This newest offering from Jennifer Moeller Price, executive chef and co-owner of the Wild Mushroom and the Wild Mushroom Merchant, is a casual open-air bar and cafe, set smack on the water in Canton.Oh, there are mushrooms, to be sure -- grilled on skewers and roasted on hoagies. A saucer-size portobello served as a plate for hot crab dip that was spiked with cheese but skimpy on crab.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE United Feature Syndicate | February 4, 1996
Scallops are a handy tool for the cook in a hurry: the plump, meaty bivalves come already shucked, and they need only minutes to cook. The bright flavors in the main dish pair well with the deeper notes in a spinach salad tossed with a black-olive vinaigrette. A warm loaf of crusty Italian bread balances all.Fusilli with scallops and fennelServes 41 large fennel bulb with feathery tops3/4 pound spinach or plain fusilli or rotini1 tablespoon olive oil1 clove garlic, finely chopped1 pound bay or sea scallops, halved or quartered if large1 tablespoon Pernod or other anise-flavored liquor1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice2 teaspoons grated lemon zestsalt and freshly ground black pepper to taste1.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | July 23, 1992
I had waited years to go to The Milton Inn. It's one of those venerable places that crops up in almost every conversation about the area's best restaurants -- best special occasion, fancy, expensive restaurants, that is. And with its name are always accolades about beautiful atmosphere, exquisite food, memorable evenings.So, I went recently -- with a reservation made three weeks in advance -- with great anticipation.I think it was too much anticipation. This was clearly a case of getting there being at least half the fun.Don't get me wrong.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
For a light lunch that can be made ahead and transported, try a salad of tender baby spinach leaves, carrot ribbons and sliced green onions tossed in a light sesame and wine vinegar dressing. Pick up a roasted chicken and slice its breast meat to add to the salad. Sprinkle the salad with crispy fried ginger chips. To serve with it, a crusty baguette is perfect, and for dessert, pick up a pint of grapefruit sorbet and a basket of fresh blueberries. The delectable ginger chips are what make this salad distinctive.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | February 25, 1998
If you're getting a little tired of the typical family routine of ground something one night, chicken breasts the next night, and takeout another night, you might want to try these fish bundles. These fish fillets also answer the "dinner in minutes" call and varieties can be switched around according to what's fresh at the market and on sale.These baked packages are basically fat-free and are flavored with the character of the Yucatan peninsula. Pair them with some spicy beans to which barbecue sauce can be added for some extra zing.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 27, 1991
Oysters taste better as the weather gets colder. A Chesapeake Bay waterman told me that once, and I have since accepted it as gospel. I believe almost anything that the guys who catch oysters tell me about the mollusks.I believe, for instance, that oysters "plump up after a good frost." That the "r" months, ones with the letter "r" in their names, are the prime time to feed on oysters. That you don't want to eat oysters and ice cream at the same meal, because the ice cream will turn the oysters into stone in your stomach.
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