Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpina Bifida
IN THE NEWS

Spina Bifida

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Everett Cook, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
Daniel Romanchuk gives you a blank stare when you try and explain to him why he is an inspiration. He looks confused - why would anybody care to see him race, legs tucked under him, neck crammed forward, and be inspired? He's just a kid who likes to race. Daniel, 13, can tell you the name of the disease that robbed him of the use of his legs before birth - spina bifida - but he can't tell you anything about it. It's not important, and he doesn't care. If Daniel cared about the spina bifida, then maybe he wouldn't have started swimming independently at age 3. Maybe he wouldn't have started at the Bennett Blazers Physically Challenged Sports program when he was 2 years old, training in a range of sports from basketball to sled hockey.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Tatyana McFadden, a Clarksville native, concluded her time in the Winter Paralympics in Sochi, Russia, with a seventh-place finish in the women's cross country skiing 5-kilometer sit race. McFadden finished with a time of 17 minutes, 27.8 seconds, which trailed Germany's Andrea Eskau, the gold-medal winner in 16:08.6, by 1:19.2. Ukraine's Lyudmyla Pavlenko (16:27.0) won the silver, while the United States' Oksana Masters (17:04.8) took bronze. McFadden, born with spina bifida in St. Petersburg, Russia, and who lived in an orphanage, was adopted by Deborah McFadden at age 6 and brought to the United States.
Advertisement
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Tatyana McFadden, a Clarksville native, concluded her time in the Winter Paralympics in Sochi, Russia, with a seventh-place finish in the women's cross country skiing 5-kilometer sit race. McFadden finished with a time of 17 minutes, 27.8 seconds, which trailed Germany's Andrea Eskau, the gold-medal winner in 16:08.6, by 1:19.2. Ukraine's Lyudmyla Pavlenko (16:27.0) won the silver, while the United States' Oksana Masters (17:04.8) took bronze. McFadden, born with spina bifida in St. Petersburg, Russia, and who lived in an orphanage, was adopted by Deborah McFadden at age 6 and brought to the United States.
FEATURES
By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
Janice O'Donnell watched the number on her screen climb and climb and climb. And when she couldn't watch any more, there were text messages from friends asking if she was watching. By the end of the day, close to $50,000 had poured in through the Chive Charities campaign set up to benefit her 2-year-old-daughter, Addyson, who was born with spina bifida. "I basically spent the entire day crying," O'Donnell said. She had expected maybe a couple thousand dollars, at the most.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | June 9, 2013
When you set out to push 3,000 miles across the country in a racing wheelchair, you expect a few challenges along the way. Ryan Chalmers had his share, that's for sure. Hands that blistered and cracked and turned the color of eggplant from punishing 70-mile days? Check. Hairpin turn on an eight-mile descent in the Rocky Mountains that nearly caused him to wipe out into the side of a tunnel? Check. Enraged bull on the side of a road in Illinois giving him the evil eye?
FEATURES
By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
Janice O'Donnell watched the number on her screen climb and climb and climb. And when she couldn't watch any more, there were text messages from friends asking if she was watching. By the end of the day, close to $50,000 had poured in through the Chive Charities campaign set up to benefit her 2-year-old-daughter, Addyson, who was born with spina bifida. "I basically spent the entire day crying," O'Donnell said. She had expected maybe a couple thousand dollars, at the most.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Maybe you've seen the ads. They've been all over TV and in magazines like Time and Sports Illustrated. There is U.S. Paralympian Tatyana McFadden in her sleek titanium racing wheelchair, hunched over in mid-push, shoulder muscles rippling, a look of fierce determination on her face. The ads, from petroleum giant BP, call her "Lady Velocity" and carry the tag line "Team USA: Fueling Their Future. " Which is fitting, in a way. Because whatever is fueling Tatyana McFadden - whatever is pumping through her heart and coursing through her veins and energizing that ripped torso - medical science might want to study it someday.
SPORTS
By Greg Stoda and Greg Stoda,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 15, 1991
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The Michigan basketball team is ranked No. 18 in the country, features a freshman class for the ages and is coached by a man who took the Wolverines to a national championship during his first six games.And its captain? Well, its captain is a non-scholarship senior who walked on the team last season and now wears a brace much of the time to relieve back pain caused by spina bifida.Freddie Hunter -- he of the shaved head and electric smile -- says the job is simply a result of his "being in the right place at the right time."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Mandy made it to the fair.Amanda Gail "Mandy" Kent smiled as she moved among the exhibits at Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair, in her motorized wheelchair, on Thursday. Many people stopped to see how she was doing."No more speeding," said a state police trooper, with a smile.4-H friends, who have worked with Mandy for seven years, couldn't resist giving her a gentle hug."Easy on the hugs," said the Hampstead teen. "I'm a little sore. I just got more than 50 stitches out yesterday."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
After seven hours of grueling surgery on her spine, the patient awoke and felt the good news -- right down to her toes."Right after the surgery, I could wiggle my toes," said Amanda Gail "Mandy" Kent. "I am really excited because I haven't been able to move my feet or legs for about a year and a half."The 16-year-old Hampstead resident is no stranger to hospitals and operations. She has undergone 22 operations since she was born with spina bifida, a congenital defect that can result in partial paralysis.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | June 9, 2013
When you set out to push 3,000 miles across the country in a racing wheelchair, you expect a few challenges along the way. Ryan Chalmers had his share, that's for sure. Hands that blistered and cracked and turned the color of eggplant from punishing 70-mile days? Check. Hairpin turn on an eight-mile descent in the Rocky Mountains that nearly caused him to wipe out into the side of a tunnel? Check. Enraged bull on the side of a road in Illinois giving him the evil eye?
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2012
Maybe you've seen the ads. They've been all over TV and in magazines like Time and Sports Illustrated. There is U.S. Paralympian Tatyana McFadden in her sleek titanium racing wheelchair, hunched over in mid-push, shoulder muscles rippling, a look of fierce determination on her face. The ads, from petroleum giant BP, call her "Lady Velocity" and carry the tag line "Team USA: Fueling Their Future. " Which is fitting, in a way. Because whatever is fueling Tatyana McFadden - whatever is pumping through her heart and coursing through her veins and energizing that ripped torso - medical science might want to study it someday.
SPORTS
By Everett Cook, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
Daniel Romanchuk gives you a blank stare when you try and explain to him why he is an inspiration. He looks confused - why would anybody care to see him race, legs tucked under him, neck crammed forward, and be inspired? He's just a kid who likes to race. Daniel, 13, can tell you the name of the disease that robbed him of the use of his legs before birth - spina bifida - but he can't tell you anything about it. It's not important, and he doesn't care. If Daniel cared about the spina bifida, then maybe he wouldn't have started swimming independently at age 3. Maybe he wouldn't have started at the Bennett Blazers Physically Challenged Sports program when he was 2 years old, training in a range of sports from basketball to sled hockey.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2001
DROGHEDA, Ireland - Patricia Byrne was born in 1960 with two open lesions at the base of her spine, exposing raw nerve bundles. Doctors told Byrne's panicked mother she would be better off not knowing what was wrong and waited three days to unite mother and child. They waited another five years to make the diagnosis official, such was the shame surrounding what became known as the "Irish disease" because of its high rates here. Byrne had spina bifida, the most common and one of the most debilitating of "neural tube" birth defects caused by the failure of the spine to fuse during the first month of pregnancy.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- Mandy made it to the fair.Amanda Gail "Mandy" Kent smiled as she moved among the exhibits at Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair, in her motorized wheelchair, on Thursday. Many people stopped to see how she was doing."No more speeding," said a state police trooper, with a smile.4-H friends, who have worked with Mandy for seven years, couldn't resist giving her a gentle hug."Easy on the hugs," said the Hampstead teen. "I'm a little sore. I just got more than 50 stitches out yesterday."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
After seven hours of grueling surgery on her spine, the patient awoke and felt the good news -- right down to her toes."Right after the surgery, I could wiggle my toes," said Amanda Gail "Mandy" Kent. "I am really excited because I haven't been able to move my feet or legs for about a year and a half."The 16-year-old Hampstead resident is no stranger to hospitals and operations. She has undergone 22 operations since she was born with spina bifida, a congenital defect that can result in partial paralysis.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2001
DROGHEDA, Ireland - Patricia Byrne was born in 1960 with two open lesions at the base of her spine, exposing raw nerve bundles. Doctors told Byrne's panicked mother she would be better off not knowing what was wrong and waited three days to unite mother and child. They waited another five years to make the diagnosis official, such was the shame surrounding what became known as the "Irish disease" because of its high rates here. Byrne had spina bifida, the most common and one of the most debilitating of "neural tube" birth defects caused by the failure of the spine to fuse during the first month of pregnancy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 15, 1992
The U.S. Public Health Service recommended yesterday that all women of childbearing age take extra folic acid, a B vitamin, to prevent neural tube defects that affect 1 to 2 of every 1,000 babies born each year. The effects of these birth defects include paralysis and death.Researchers on birth defects and nutrition said that if the advice was followed the incidence of neural tube defects like spina bifida and anencephaly should fall to between one-quarter and one-half the current figure of 2,300 cases a year.
SPORTS
By Greg Stoda and Greg Stoda,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 15, 1991
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- The Michigan basketball team is ranked No. 18 in the country, features a freshman class for the ages and is coached by a man who took the Wolverines to a national championship during his first six games.And its captain? Well, its captain is a non-scholarship senior who walked on the team last season and now wears a brace much of the time to relieve back pain caused by spina bifida.Freddie Hunter -- he of the shaved head and electric smile -- says the job is simply a result of his "being in the right place at the right time."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.