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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Rep. Elijah Cummings wants folks to know that he's keeping it real. Like really, really, really real. Starting with where he lives. He told a crowd at Howard University Wednesday just how down-and-dirty real his Baltimore neighborhood is. “I live in the inner, inner, inner-city. I'm one of the few congresspeople who live in the inner, inner city," The Hill reported Cummings saying. "You know, I ain't living close to the inner city, I'm right there on the 'Do the Right Thing' block.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
Rep. Elijah Cummings wants folks to know that he's keeping it real. Like really, really, really real. Starting with where he lives. He told a crowd at Howard University Wednesday just how down-and-dirty real his Baltimore neighborhood is. “I live in the inner, inner, inner-city. I'm one of the few congresspeople who live in the inner, inner city," The Hill reported Cummings saying. "You know, I ain't living close to the inner city, I'm right there on the 'Do the Right Thing' block.
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By Los Angeles Times | October 12, 1990
Films going into production:''Jungle Fever'' (40 Acres and a Mule Filmworks). Shooting in New York. Spike Lee's next concerns a black man from Harlem and his interracial love connection with an Italian-American from Brooklyn's Bensonhurst section. Wesley Snipes, Shadow in "Mo' Better Blues," stars alongside Annabella Sciorra. Also stars Lee, Lonette McKee, John Turturro, Samuel Jackson, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Distributor is Universal.''Auntie Lee's Meat Pies (Steiner Films). Shooting in Los Angeles.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 26, 2008
Spike Lee's Tuscany-set World War II movie, Miracle at St. Anna, is overlong, awkward and unsubtle, yet at the end, when the screen went black and a bracingly clear and fervid chorus broke into the glorious spiritual "He's got the whole world in his hands," my throat tightened and I fought back tears. For all his excesses and wrong turns, Lee has made a grown-up movie with an adult sense of loss and an adult sense of hope. He may be addicted to broad flourishes, but he has the big emotions to back them up. Miracle at St. Anna mostly follows four "Buffalo Soldiers" - African-American soldiers fighting in segregated units - as they leapfrog over the rest of the Army's positions and land in a hamlet filled with terrified villagers.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 18, 1992
Call him the Defiant One. Born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Neb., and orphaned young by racist violence, Malcolm X's journey is inspirational not merely for African-Americans but for the dispossessed as a category: for all the peoples of color or economic desolation who have somehow been subtly informed over the years that America really isn't for them.But before he was an idea, long before he was a hat or a potato chip, he was a man. And "Malcolm X," Spike Lee's 3-hour, 21-minute biographical account of the hustler who became a separatist agitator on his way to becoming a passionate humanist, has this great strength: It never loses sight of the man.And in a funny way, Malcolm X's life, as told by Lee, projects the American dream at its purest, a Horatio Alger story to end all Horatio Alger stories -- except that the poor boy whose rise in the world it chronicles doesn't find a pot of gold but something infinitely more valuable -- he finds his soul.
SPORTS
By Tom Keegan and Tom Keegan,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Film director Spike Lee, pressed against the chain link fence yesterday at a White Sox minor-league diamond, chatted with the right fielder between pitches."
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By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | March 11, 1994
In a speech more personal than political, more anecdotal than polemical, a subdued and somber Spike Lee discussed his six movies and his newest film before a sympathetic capacity crowd of 500 at Catonsville Community College last night.Although the outspoken filmmaker, 36, has spent his career tackling controversies, he spoke mostly about his films and his filmmaking, leaving political protest and speculation to some audience members. When questioners tried to draw him out on racial and political matters, he budged little.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 7, 1991
'Jungle Fever'Starring Wesley Snipes and Annabella Sciorra.Directed by Spike Lee.Released by Universal.Rated R.*** 1/22 Give this to Spike Lee: He sees everything.In his private life he may be a strident polemicist, a hustling millionaire gym shoe salesman and a loudmouthed whiner who blames everything on "the problem" -- racism -- but behind the camera he's an artist, with an artist's vision and compassion.In his new "Jungle Fever," he sees the pain and hope of interracial love, the despair of drugs, the stifling crunch of orthodoxy, the tragedy of broken communications.
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By Scott Walton and Scott Walton,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 11, 1991
NEW YORK No matter how many millions Spike Lee spends on his film biography of black activist Malcolm X, he'll make even more millions at the box office.And more still if he can just master Hollywood merchandising the way he mastered Hollywood filmmaking.Lee has been a hit pitching Nike sneakers and Levi's 501 jeans in advertisements, but he's not making the money he could off a sportswear item of his own creation: the X-cap.Prospective buyers come to Spike's Joint, his Brooklyn store, from as far away as Tokyo and as near as Flatbush Avenue to purchase the $17.50 X-cap Lee has worn on television and in public since last winter.
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By Lou Cedrone | June 7, 1991
SPIKE LEE, whose ''Do the Right Thing'' was more wrong than right, and whose ''Mo' Better Blues'' was almost all wrong, shows tremendous improvement in his latest film, ''Jungle Fever.''There are some things wrong with the movie, but there are many more that are right. If Lee has been criticized for being incapable of writing about relationships, if he has been rapped for not being able to end a movie, he manages both situations in the new film.Actually, the new movie has two endings. The first seems arbitrary until Marvin Gaye comes to mind, and the second is just a little much.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 2008
Who says cell phones are good only for talking? Today they are bringing together two unlikely brand names: Nokia and Spike Lee. Lee, the director, is teaming up with Nokia, the cell phone maker, to direct a short film comprising YouTube-style videos created by teenagers and adults using their mobile phones. By hiring Lee for the project, Nokia is seeking to combine the populist appeal of user-generated content with the power of a famous director's pedigree. The film will have three acts, each three to five minutes long, with the theme loosely based on the concept of humanity.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Reporter | February 25, 2007
To watch Savion Glover dance to Vivaldi's Four Seasons is to see a man trying to turn himself into a violin. SAVION GLOVER WITH THE BSO / / 8 p.m. Thursday and Saturday, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall / / 8 p.m. Friday, Strathmore Hall / / 410-783-8000 or balti moresymphony.org; 877-276-1444 or bsoatstrathmore.org Savion Glover Age: 33 Birthplace: Newark, N.J. Residence: New York Stage: Won eight major awards, including a 1996 Tony Award for choreography for Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk.
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August 21, 2006
WORLD Baghdad worshipers slain Gunmen took aim at Shiite Muslim pilgrims marching through Baghdad yesterday, killing at least 22 and leaving hundreds injured in a vivid illustration of the sectarian violence driving Iraq toward possible civil war. pg 8a MARYLAND Cardin, Mfume face off The two leading Democratic candidates for Senate - Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin and Kweisi Mfume, the former congressman and NAACP leader - offered similar views on Iraq,...
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By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 21, 2006
Each television season, one or two productions cut through the clutter of mediocre programming with a power and resonance that makes them seem almost too good for TV. Last September's PBS premiere of Martin Scorsese's No Direction Home, a soaring biography of Bob Dylan held that distinction. The season opener of Fox's 24, with the shocking assassination of President David Palmer (Dennis Haysbert), earned it last January. Now comes Spike Lee's documentary, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts, airing tonight and tomorrow at 9 on HBO. On TV When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts airs at 9 tonight and tomorrow night on HBO.
NEWS
By PHILANA PATTERSON and PHILANA PATTERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2006
One way to tell that summer is on its way is to check out Rhonda Summey's reading list. The Upper Marlboro assistant school principal's book club reads a mix of fiction and nonfiction titles year round, but as the days grow longer, the book selections get less serious. The group sometimes throws a romance into the summer mix. "Our goal is find beach reads," says Summey, 34. This summer, however, half of the group's books will be more serious in nature. Inspired by the March death of Gordon Parks, the noted African-American photographer, filmmaker, composer and writer, the group will dig into his book Voices in the Mirror: An Autobiography.
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By ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 24, 2006
INSIDE MAN Rating -- R. What it's about -- Crooks rob a bank and take hostages, and the cops wait them out. The Kid Attractor Factor -- A heist picture, with director Spike Lee's humor and Denzel Washington as the star. Good lessons/bad lessons -- Sometimes, the real villains aren't the ones wearing masks. Violence -- Beatings, shootings. Not a lot of it, though. Language -- Spike Lee likes his profanity. Sex -- Spike Lee likes his women in underwear. Drugs -- None. Parents advisory -- Not the harshest R, and certainly not the most violent.
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By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Director Spike Lee came to Baltimore yesterday and implored African American newspaper publishers to do the right thing by supporting his new movie, "Malcolm X."The movie focuses on the life of the slain black leader and is scheduled for a November release. Based on a screenplay by the late writers James Baldwin and Arnold Perl, the film stars Denzel Washington as Malcolm X."I need the support of the black press," Mr. Lee told about 200 people gathered at the Hyatt Regency Hotel for the National Newspaper Publishers Association convention.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Spike Lee grafts his unique sensibilities onto a pretty conventional bank heist plot with Inside Man. The results are mixed; some of Lee's cinematic tricks seem simply out of place. But look past the occasional slip, and what emerges is a slick, briskly paced tale of bank robbers who think they're at least half-again as smart as everybody else, and maybe are. Lee, working off a screenplay from first-timer Russell Gewirtz, certainly benefits from his continued good standing within Hollywood's acting community.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 24, 2004
Spike Lee's She Hate Me contains the seeds of a half-dozen good, thought-provoking movies, in genres ranging from sexual spoof and political satire to corporate drama and morality play. That's the good news. The bad news is that She Hate Me is a scattershot mess, a film that seems to have no idea where it's going and offers little compelling reason for audiences to try to figure it out. It's as though Lee, frustrated by today's political and cultural climate, sees this as his one shot at grabbing his audience's attention and shaking some sense into them.
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