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By Los Angeles Times | May 4, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- The success of Disney's "Beauty and the Beast" has not been lost on British mega-producer Cameron Mackintosh. The man who made millions off such stage blockbusters as "Cats," "Les Miserables" and "The Phantom of the Opera" is talking with Steven Spielberg about an animated version of Rudyard Kipling's classic "Just So Stories."Mr. Mackintosh had mounted two small productions in England of "Just So," a musical based on the Kipling book, and somebody in the audience alerted Mr. Spielberg to the project.
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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
He has worked in television, film and stage in London, Los Angeles and points in between, and now spends a fair amount of time lecturing on a luxury cruise ship. But the biggest constant in Robert Neal Marshall's life could be filmmaking. His grandfather's career in newsreels was catapulted by footage of Charles Lindbergh's historic flight to Paris in 1927, and Marshall's mother was a television and stage actress in New York, so the Columbia resident comes by his flair for visual and performing arts naturally, he said.
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By Los Angeles Daily News | July 24, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- With budget cuts grounding the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department helicopter fleet, film director Steven Spielberg hired private choppers to search for -- and rescue -- his nephew who was missing in the Angeles National Forest.Spending between $3,000 and $4,000 for the two-hour search yesterday, the family of hiker Christopher Simon, 23, a nephew of Mr. Spielberg's wife, Kate Capshaw, opted to hire its own search team rather than wait for overtime authorization required by the Sheriff's Department prior to activating a chopper, officials said.
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By Robert Lloyd and Tribune Newspapers | March 14, 2010
It was inevitable after the popular and critical success of their 2001 World War II miniseries "Band of Brothers," which told the story of the drive to conquer Hitler and Mussolini, that executive producers Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg would return to finish the job. "The Pacific," which tells the story of the war against Japan, is here - it begins tonight on HBO - and is its forerunner's equal in emotive strength, weird poetry and technical bravura....
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 10, 1994
Stephen Spielberg's "Schindler's List," an epic story of evil and redemption set against one of the darkest events in history, received 12 nominations, including Best Picture, for the 66th Annual Academy Awards yesterday in Los Angeles.Other Best Picture nominees were Jim Sheridan's "In the Name of the Father," James Ivory's "The Remains of the Day," both of which received eight nominations, Jane Campion's "The Piano" and, most unexpectedly, "The Fugitive," directed by journeyman Andrew Davis.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | December 5, 1997
NEW YORK -- If you think that race relations in the United States have steadily, almost miraculously, improved over the past 35 years -- which I do -- this might be a good week to stay away from newspapers and television news.Names make news, and we are about to be bombarded by some of the biggest of them, beginning with President Clinton and Steven Spielberg, moving on to ''Doonesbury,'' and dropping down to Tawana Brawley and Latrell Sprewell.Race extravaganzaThe president's well-meaning race extravaganza began Wednesday with a town hall meeting in Akron, Ohio, and continued yesterday with the first public hearings of his Advisory Board on Race, chaired by the Duke University historian John Hope Franklin.
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By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,Contributing Writer | September 2, 1994
Making good on his Oscar-night remarks to "not allow the Holocaust to remain a footnote in history," "Schindler's List" director Steven Spielberg has announced plans to create "Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation" to videotape the largest library of Holocaust survivor testimonies ever.The non-profit foundation -- which incorporates the Hebrew word for Holocaust into its name -- intends to record and preserve the oral histories of all Holocaust survivors wanting to tell their stories.
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By Daniel Cerone and Daniel Cerone,Los Angeles Times | October 11, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Steven Spielberg has reached an agreement with NBC to produce 22 episodes of a big-budget, underwater adventure series called "Sea Quest" for next fall, according to a source at Mr. Spielberg's production company, Amblin Entertainment.The science-fiction series about a research submarine in the year 2018 was created by Mr. Spielberg with Rockne S. O'Bannon, a story editor on "The New Twilight Zone." Roy Scheider was reportedly being pursued to star in the series, but no cast has been set.Officials at Universal Television, which will produce "Sea Quest" with Amblin, and NBC would not confirm the finished deal, but suggested that an official announcement would be forthcoming.
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By George Will | December 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Recently Hollywood has been an object of much derision, much of it merited, particularly when dishonest and propagandistic movies have been made about American history. The name Oliver Stone comes to mind.Now comes Steven Spielberg's ''Amistad,'' a redemptive movie, in two senses. It redeems Hollywood's reputation as a place where movies can be made for grown-ups. And ''Amistad'' celebrates America's capacity for rising from sin to something akin to nobility.A truthful filmFor the third time in eight years Hollywood has produced a nuanced, truthful film about America's racial history.
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By GREGORY KANE | August 15, 1998
I suppose it was inevitable. Sooner or later someone would start kvetching about Steven Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan." I figured someone would complain the film was either too white or too male. I figured right."Where were the blacks who landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day?" folks have asked. In fact, the all-black 320th Barrage Balloon Battalion did storm the beach June 6, 1944, and suffer heavy casualties like Spielberg depicted with terrifying effectiveness in his film.But the U.S. Army -- and all the country's military, for that matter -- was segregated at the time.
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By From Sun news services | January 17, 2009
David Letterman's 'Great Moments' segment to end as Bush leaves office The end of the Bush administration also marks the end of "Great Moments in Presidential Speeches," an enduring feature on David Letterman's Late Show that pokes fun at the president's vocal stumbles. Late Show writer Tom Ruprecht may remember Tuesday as the day he was sprung - from hours spent in his office watching Bush speeches to find those magic moments. The first "Great Moment" came on March 30, 2006; it was followed by 377 more.
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December 18, 2007
64 Keith Richards Rock singer 61 Steven Spielberg Movie director 44 Brad Pitt Actor 29 Katie Holmes Actress 27 Christina Aguilera Singer
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By Michael Sragow | September 7, 2007
Everyone knows him as "Jerry." But when asked what a critic should call him, he doesn't miss a beat. "Sir Seinfeld. Even though I have not been knighted, it is what I prefer," he says like a true master of his domain, be it stand-up or sitcom or, now, animated movie. Jerry Seinfeld in conversation is an easy, playful ironist. When celebrated by Chris Rock, Garry Shandling and Robert Klein before accepting HBO's first Comedian Award this year, he expressed shock that Shandling had prepared some notes for the occasion.
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By Patrick Goldstein and Patrick Goldstein,Los Angeles Times | July 27, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- American presidents can serve only two terms. In baseball, even a great slugger is lucky to get a seven-year contract. But at Viacom, Sumner Redstone is apparently king for life. In recent days, the media have been roiling with a new round of eye-rolling tales about the cantankerous Viacom chairman's fights and feuds, from an ugly dispute with his daughter Shari over her succession, to reports that Dream- Works founders David Geffen and Steven Spielberg are still seething over perceived snubs since being acquired by Paramount, a Viacom subsidiary, in late 2005.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 17, 2006
This year's roster of Oscar nominations has been hailed for introducing a new flock of talent to the Academy's ranks. But Oscar 2005 still looks a lot like Oscar 1975. Steven Spielberg's Munich has earned multiple nominations (including best director). Robert Altman will be getting an honorary Oscar for his body of work. Woody Allen has received a nomination for writing Match Point. In 1975, the Altman of M*A*S*H and McCabe and Mrs. Miller was the master gambler of American filmmaking.
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By ALAN DERSHOWITZ | January 15, 2006
Steven Spielberg has remarked that he made Munich to promote a dialogue about the nature of terrorism and the efficacy of counterterrorism. His screenwriter, Tony Kushner, said on National Public Radio that he did not feel compelled to portray with accuracy Israel's retaliation against the Munich killers because "an audience has the resources to check" what is real and what is fiction. Well, here's a reality check. Did Israeli counterterrorism measures after Munich create a "cycle of violence"?
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By Chris Kaltenbach | July 31, 1998
As far as historian Stephen Ambrose is concerned, the verdict is unequivocal: "Saving Private Ryan" is the greatest war film ever made. Not simply from an artistic perspective, although Ambrose has nothing but praise for the artistry of director Steven Spielberg. Not simply because Tom Hanks' portrayal of the enigmatic Capt. Miller is as good as it gets."Saving Private Ryan" is the greatest because it rings the truest, says Ambrose, who served as a consultant on the movie and accompanied Spielberg and Hanks on a trip to Washington last week.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 13, 1995
The Hollywood press corps has been calling Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen the Dream Team since the three announced their partnership in October to form a new entertainment company.Two-thirds of the team, Katzenberg and Spielberg, met with critics in Los Angeles yesterday supposedly to explain what their company would mean to the TV industry. But instead of details, all they had was recycled talk of the "dreams" that led to their partnership.How much of a non-news-event was the standing-room-only press conference?
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 30, 2005
When the movie gods conspired with Edison and others to create the cinema, they gave us two great gifts: Life recorded so keenly that common joys and tragedies - and uncommon ideas or emotions - became miraculously vivid and lasting. Illusions conjured so divinely that they took audiences out of this world and into arenas of pure magic or wild conjecture. For movies that opened in Baltimore this year, documentary-makers and fact-based filmmakers amazed us with a stream of nature sagas that were hair-raising (Grizzly Man)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 23, 2005
The best gag in Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park came when the T. rex popped up in the rearview mirror of a speeding Jeep over the words, "Objects in the mirror may be closer than they appear." In their turgid, sermonizing anti-thriller Munich, Spielberg and Tony Kushner (Angels in America) look in history's rearview mirror and aim for the same effect. Their movie is ostensibly about the aftermath to the Palestinian terrorist slaughter of 11 members of the Israeli Olympic squad during the 1972 Summer Games.
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