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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
A fourth theater at Rotunda Cinemas will open Friday, owner-operator Ira Miller announced today. "It's the first part of an expanded entertainment center that will also include a coffee shop," he said. The new auditorium, which Miller has installed in the space formerly occupied by Tomlinson Craft Collection, is roughly the same size as the 80-seat theater that Miller opened in fall 2010. But this one is 3-D-ready (like the Rotunda's bigger theaters) and boasts a larger screen.
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NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | December 23, 2008
Available on Microsoft Xbox 360. Also for Sony PlayStation 3, PS2, PSP, Nintendo Wii, DS, PC. $59.99 ($29.99-$59.99 for others) Rated teen. ** 1/2 A definite improvement over the Spider-Man 3 video game, Web of Shadows still lacks a certain level of polish. The camera is sometimes a greater challenge than the foes; Spider-Man's voice actor is annoying; and the plot, involving Venom's symbiote spreading across the city, is set up clumsily. Yet the game has its moments. With access to both his standard and his symbiote suit, Spider-Man doesn't lack for entertaining combat options - especially as he unlocks new ones with experience points won through completing missions.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 24, 2012
As expected, "The Hunger Games" is killing at the box office this weekend, taking in more than $68 million in the first day of ticket sales. Estimates for the entire weekend range around $140 million as might be expected with the off-the-charts pre-release media buzz and almost uniformaly favorable reviews. According to boxofficemojo, the adaptation of the first book in Suzanne Collins' trilogy ranks fifth on the all-time list behind Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 ($91.1 million)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 2002
DALLAS - It's 10 a.m. - time for coffee and maybe a smoke for dozens of office workers in downtown Dallas. But, wait, what's that dangling from the top of the 56-story Renaissance Tower? The blue speck swinging back and forth from a mountaineer's rope is just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man performing a stunt to promote today's release of last summer's movie Spider-Man on video and DVD. The crowd of dozens quickly swelled to hundreds yesterday. Some of them, dressed in Halloween costumes they wore to work, added to the spectacle.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | May 6, 2004
THE APPEAL OF baseball, for those who fall for it in any meaningful fashion, is its traditions. For example: What a nice sight at Camden Yards before last night's game. The grounds crew out there raking the infield, manicuring the pitching mound, chalking the batter's box and those thick, plush foul lines. Then came the finale of that hallowed ritual: the installation of those fresh, white bases. The key phrase here is "fresh, white bases." It's not "colorful bases adorned with logos from Columbia Pictures to promote a movie about an action hero whose plot has absolutely nothing to do with the national pastime."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | July 1, 2004
Tobey Maguire was still naive enough in 2001 to believe that Spider-Man would not change his life in any significant way. His naivete lasted exactly three days. On the third day after the movie opened to what was then a box-office record, Maguire left home for a lunch date, only to discover that he was a marked man. He had become instant tabloid bait. For the first time in his acting career, he was considered worthy of being stalked by celebrity photographers. "I'm not stupid," the 29-year-old actor said as he reclined on a sofa in his dressing room on a studio lot in Culver City, Calif.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
Expect to see Spider-Man hanging around the entrance gates and the JumboTron at Camden Yards during the weekend of June 11-13, but don't look for him in the on-deck circles. T.J. Brightman, the Orioles' vice president of corporate sales and sponsorships, said yesterday that the team won't put the logo from the movie Spider-Man 2 on the on-deck circles, and won't use the ad-adorned home plate or rubber for the ceremonial first pitch. "It is a Major League Baseball initiative, and we are participating at baseball's request," Brightman said.
BUSINESS
By Eric Benderoff and Eric Benderoff,Chicago Tribune | May 3, 2007
Unless you've been trapped in a villain's lair, you know Spider-Man 3 opens tomorrow. Not surprisingly, the promotional spin has gripped my house. Spidey adorns my 3-year-old's shoes, his underwear, his pajamas and now his juice box. But this is not a column about clever marketers and their web of product placements. Rather, this is how one parent indulges a thirst to learn Spidey's adventures beyond the kid-friendly comic books we buy.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 8, 2004
The name Alfred Molina isn't exactly synonymous with charisma. For three decades - in productions that range from the elegant Enchanted April to the bombastic Boogie Nights - the 51-year-old British actor has earned a reputation for performances that are inventive, intelligent and sometimes larger-than-life. But charisma? Not so much. "I belong to a very honorable tradition, and I'm very proud of it," said Molina. "The character actor tradition." That's why some movie mavens were puzzled by his being cast as Doctor Octopus in Spider-Man 2, which opened last week.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | March 22, 2012
After being bombarded with news of Third World problems for so long, I figured it was time to give a bit of equal time to First World suffering. Every so often I reach a boiling point with modern Western culture and feel the need to rant -- so I'm going to bleed it out through my fingertips, as Ernest Hemingway used to say of writing, before my brain explodes from the pressure. -- After years of not owning a television, I finally broke down and bought one in November, thinking that maybe it was time to stop being a misanthropic weirdo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Stan Lee is one proud father these days. You'd be proud, too, if your progeny included Spider-Man, Iron Man, Thor and the Fantastic Four — characters whose films routinely bring in a few hundred million dollars at the movie box office. Not that Lee has much to do with the movies themselves: His connection is restricted to a largely honorary executive-producer credit and a cameo in each film — as a swinging Hugh Hefner-type in "Iron Man," mailman Willie Limpkin in "Fantastic Four," an Army general in this summer's "Captain America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2010
Conviction, passion and creativity crackle and swing with a jazzy euphoria when you talk to Julie Taymor about art, whether the tragicomedy of the Bard or the myth-making of Marvel Comics. The director who brought experimental techniques to the Great White Way with "The Lion King" returns to screen and stage this winter with a rare aesthetic one-two combination. Taymor has unveiled a lyrical, thrilllingly lucid film of Shakespeare's "The Tempest," starring Helen Mirren, while completing the hugely ambitious and elaborate Broadway musical, " Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," which boasts a score by Bono and the Edge.
NEWS
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | December 23, 2008
Available on Microsoft Xbox 360. Also for Sony PlayStation 3, PS2, PSP, Nintendo Wii, DS, PC. $59.99 ($29.99-$59.99 for others) Rated teen. ** 1/2 A definite improvement over the Spider-Man 3 video game, Web of Shadows still lacks a certain level of polish. The camera is sometimes a greater challenge than the foes; Spider-Man's voice actor is annoying; and the plot, involving Venom's symbiote spreading across the city, is set up clumsily. Yet the game has its moments. With access to both his standard and his symbiote suit, Spider-Man doesn't lack for entertaining combat options - especially as he unlocks new ones with experience points won through completing missions.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
If the football field is Dawan Landry's stage, then the Ravens strong safety's body is his canvas. Aside from being blessed with quadriceps as thick as tree trunks, abs that you could wash clothes on and biceps that have earned him the moniker "Puffy" from teammate Bart Scott, Landry bears seven tattoos on his 6-foot, 220-pound frame.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
Hollywood is a land built on illusion, so maybe it shouldn't surprise anyone that the film industry painted a record-breaking economic picture this summer - or that the portrait may not be as pretty as it first appears. For the season that concluded Labor Day weekend, ticket sales were up 11 percent over last year, to $4.15 billion. That total set an all-time record, besting the previous best summer - 2004's $3.86 billion - by 8 percent. For the first time, Hollywood films earned more than $4 billion in domestic box-office revenue.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2004
SUN SCORE **** Spider-Man 2 is a comic-book film with the soul and tang of a funny-sad first-love story. The dazzling visuals and special-effects cohere into a stirring and sometimes hilarious romantic adventure that pits two bereft males against each other and dots the screen with wounded hearts. Spider-Man, aka Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire), decides he can never consummate his passion for Mary Jane Watson (Kirsten Dunst) because he endangers everyone who gets close to him. Dr. Otto Octavius (Alfred Molina)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 3, 2007
After conquering Doc Ock and the Green Goblin in the first two films, and fighting the New Goblin and that "human sandpile" the Sandman in the first hour of this film, a beleaguered Spider-Man hauls himself to a perch high over Manhattan and asks, wearily, "Where do all these guys come from?" It's the biggest laugh line in the movie. But before long audiences are asking, "Where do all these guys come from? And why?" Spider-Man 3 (Sony) Starring Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco, Thomas Haden Church, Topher Grace, Bryce Dallas Howard.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 25, 2007
Where's The Lizard? Now that everyone in America has seen Spider-Man 3 (and judging by the box office, that's not too much of an exaggeration), it's time to demand an answer to the question that's been on every Spidey fan's mind since Peter Parker and the gang first showed up on movie screens in 2002. Where's The Lizard? Where's the human reptile who bedeviled Spider-Man on the comic book pages for years? Where's that violently malevolent alter-ego of good-guy scientist Curt Connors, Parker's science professor?
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | May 4, 2007
`Spider-Man 3' Rating -- PG-13 for sequences of intense action violence. What it's about -- Spider-Man faces multiple villains and his own dark side in this finale to the Spidey trilogy. The Kid Attractor Factor -- Comic book heroes, villains and special effects fights. Good lessons/bad lessons -- It's never a good idea to try and make a girlfriend-boyfriend jealous. Violence -- Quite a bit. Language -- Quite clean. Sex -- As chaste as the day is long. Drugs -- None. Parents' advisory -- A bit grimmer than the earlier Spider-Man movies, a bit long.
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