Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpice Girls
IN THE NEWS

Spice Girls

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 23, 2008
The harmonies were at times a little weak and the dance moves a bit stiff. But none of that really mattered during the nearly two-hour glitz fest better known as the Spice Girls reunion tour. On Thursday night, it stopped by Washington's Verizon Center, where "girl power" was in full effect, as a predominantly female audience ranging from about 16 to 30 years old packed the arena. The Spice Girls hadn't performed together for a decade before they decided last year to reunite. And even more time and several pop trends have passed since the British quintet made an impact on the international music charts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Denise Weiss and For The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
This was the worst episode of "The Bachelor" to date, further reinforcing my beliefs that Juan Pablo is as interested in finding a wife as Sean Lowe is in foregoing his time in the Honeymoon Suite on his wedding night. Speaking of Sean, watching his wedding to Catherine helped to summarize the difference between Sean and Juan Pablo -- Sean is the guy to whom you say “I do,” while Juan Pablo is the guy you wake up next to after a long night of drinking and say “What did I do?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,Newsday | February 21, 2008
When the Spice Girls stormed America's shores in 1996 with their pop confection "Wannabe" and chants of "Girl power!" no one could have predicted how big their careers would get or how sturdy their roles in popular culture would be more than a decade later. Pop groups such as 'N Sync and Backstreet Boys may have sold more records, but they never made a movie like the Spice Girls and they certainly don't have any United Nations ambassadors for good will among them. Their combination of pop hits, cartoonish personalities and clever marketing made the Spice Girls more than a successful pop group -- they were a global phenomenon in the late '90s, selling more than 55 million albums, breaking all sorts of British chart records and taking their song "2 Become 1" to No. 1 in 53 countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sara Toth | April 18, 2012
If Monday's “The Voice” was a night of shock but little awe, Tuesday night was a night of crappy filler and little justification. After the merciless blow of instant eliminations, Christina Aguilera was called upon to defend herself for her cut of fan-favorite (and probable finalist) Jesse Campbell. She brushed it off, saying “I'm no stranger to controversy. I'm OK with that.” Are you? No one else is OK with it, Christina. No one. The coaches did hold all the power Monday, but Tuesday the audience had a bit more say, with their votes saving one person out of three remaining on Teams Blake and Christina, and the coaches saving one. (I think “The Voice” producers are making the rules up as they go; this is a decidedly different - and more prolonged - format than last year, and not even Wikipedia's charts and infographics are offering any clarification.)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 21, 1998
Who has more girl power, the Spice Girls or Ani DiFranco? Musically, the two could not be further apart. DiFranco is folkie and punky; the Spice Girls are pop stars and funky. DiFranco has a heritage that includes populist Woody Guthrie and feminist Ferron; the Spice Girls belong to a tradition of pop stars like Bananarama and Take That!. DiFranco's stage show is low-key and homey, relying on nothing more elaborate than amps and lights; the Spice Girls are touring with a stage that's bigger and more elaborate than many amusement parks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2008
Stephanie Luddy was in middle school when the Spice Girls came to Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia. So many of Luddy's friends went to the show, but money was tight, and she couldn't make it. Not this time around. Now, six years after disbanding, and one greatest hits album later, the Spice Girls are temporarily back together and triumphantly winding down their reunion tour. When they come to the Verizon Center in Washington tonight, Luddy will be there. "It's a little silly, but it's fun," said Luddy, a 23-year-old middle-school math teacher.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | January 29, 1998
A funny thing happened on the way out of "Spice World" -- I realized I was a Spice Girls fan.Lord knows, it wasn't what I had expected. Back in November, when the "Spice World" album came out, I was distinctly unimpressed, finding little merit in the crass commerciality of the Pepsi jingle "Generation Next" or the musical ambition of a semi-show-tune like "Lady Is a Vamp." It was as if the Spice Girls had begun to believe their success was in some way connected to having actual musical ability.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 2000
They've got nicknames. They've got girl power. They've even got their own line of action figures. What the Spice Girls don't have is flavor. Ironic, isn't it? After all the interviews in which the group protested that it wasn't prefab, it turns out the Spice Sound is. Even those who actually can hear the difference between Baby Spice and Posh Spice will have a hard time pointing out what's so Spicy about the Spice Girls' third album, "Forever," arriving in stores today. Sure, the album's sound is slick, soulful and hook-intensive, guaranteed to return the four Spices to the Top-40.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 1, 1998
The Spice Girls will be a little less spicy from here on out.Yesterday in London, it was announced that Geri Halliwell, better known as Ginger Spice, would no longer be a Spice Girl. Halliwell, who was absent from two concerts in Oslo, Norway, last week, ascribed her departure to "differences" among the five members of the group.Halliwell's departure does not mean the end of the multi-platinum "girl power" group. In a statement read by a spokesman, the remaining Spices -- Posh, Baby, Sporty and Scary -- said they were "upset and saddened by Geri's departure," but made it clear the show will go on."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 4, 1997
Had the Spice Girls paid more attention in school, they'd know about hubris.They'd remember the stories from Greek mythology about heroes who began to believe their own hype and ended up losing everything. They'd recognize how foolhardy it is to assume that having great popularity is the same thing as having tTC great talent. They'd understand how wrong it is to go against the laws of bubble-gum stardom by trying to make "serious" music.Instead, the five Spices no doubt think that a "Hugh bris" is what Hugh Grant would have to go through to become Jewish.
SPORTS
March 27, 2009
1 No end to Madness (Part 1): The NCAA tournament continues with Syracuse vs. Oklahoma (7 p.m., chs. 13, 9). Boomer Sooner goes the dynamite. 2 No end to Madness (Part 2): The next game (same channels) matches Gonzaga and UNC. The former was mentioned by the Spice Girls: "I really wanna Gonzigazag ha." 3 Icy hot: They're almost down to the NCAA Frozen Four. ESPN2 has a regional semifinal at 5:30 p.m.: Denver vs. Miami. Miami? Oh, that's the one in Ohio. 4 Doesn't matter?: A colleague says it doesn't matter that the Caps (vs. Tampa Bay, 7 p.m., Comcast Sports-Net)
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 23, 2008
The harmonies were at times a little weak and the dance moves a bit stiff. But none of that really mattered during the nearly two-hour glitz fest better known as the Spice Girls reunion tour. On Thursday night, it stopped by Washington's Verizon Center, where "girl power" was in full effect, as a predominantly female audience ranging from about 16 to 30 years old packed the arena. The Spice Girls hadn't performed together for a decade before they decided last year to reunite. And even more time and several pop trends have passed since the British quintet made an impact on the international music charts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn Gamboa and Glenn Gamboa,Newsday | February 21, 2008
When the Spice Girls stormed America's shores in 1996 with their pop confection "Wannabe" and chants of "Girl power!" no one could have predicted how big their careers would get or how sturdy their roles in popular culture would be more than a decade later. Pop groups such as 'N Sync and Backstreet Boys may have sold more records, but they never made a movie like the Spice Girls and they certainly don't have any United Nations ambassadors for good will among them. Their combination of pop hits, cartoonish personalities and clever marketing made the Spice Girls more than a successful pop group -- they were a global phenomenon in the late '90s, selling more than 55 million albums, breaking all sorts of British chart records and taking their song "2 Become 1" to No. 1 in 53 countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2008
Stephanie Luddy was in middle school when the Spice Girls came to Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia. So many of Luddy's friends went to the show, but money was tight, and she couldn't make it. Not this time around. Now, six years after disbanding, and one greatest hits album later, the Spice Girls are temporarily back together and triumphantly winding down their reunion tour. When they come to the Verizon Center in Washington tonight, Luddy will be there. "It's a little silly, but it's fun," said Luddy, a 23-year-old middle-school math teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2007
Just announced Spice Girls -- Verizon Center in Washington on Feb. 21. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Van Halen -- 1st Mariner Arena on March 9. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. tomorrow. 410-547-7328 or ticket master.com. Ladysmith Black Mambazo -- Meyerhoff Symphony Hall on Jan. 23. 410-783-8000 or bsomusic.org. Ween -- DAR Constitution Hall in Washington on Jan. 23. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Toby Mac, Jeremy Camp -- George Mason University's Patriot Center in Fairfax, Va., on March 13. Also, Trace Adkins and Bill Engvall are there March 16. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to The Sun | November 29, 2006
When Baltimore business partners Katie Luber and Sara Engram were consulting with a graphics designer late last year about packaging for tsp spices, their new line of pre-measured cooking ingredients, the young man became quite excited about their venture. "Oooo! This is such a hot idea," he said. "It's like you two are the Spice Girls!" Laughing while recounting this story, Engram, who is 57 (Luber is 45), drolly said, "I told him we were both too old for that name. We prefer to think of ourselves as the Carda-Moms."
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | October 14, 1997
A catchy song came from Richard Conway's radio. "If you wannabe my lover, you gotta get with my friends," sang the Spice Girls, as their first single "Wannabe" crashed into the British pop charts last year.Conway sensed the groundswell around the band, which would go on to make tens of millions of dollars over the next year. So Conway went to the Internet, did a search for http: //www. spicegirls.com and found it was unregistered. And so, like the domain-name pioneers and homesteaders of years gone by, Conway snapped up spicegirls.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine | January 29, 1998
One of the running gags in "Spice World" features George Wendt as an American producer keen on getting the Spice Girls into a movie. So Wendt spends the film pitching idea after outlandish idea to the group's manager (Richard E. Grant), until he eventually sells Grant on the plot that is "Spice World."Wacky, huh? But not as wacky as some of the ideas that weren't in the movie."The Spice of Music": Misfits in an Austrian convent just before World War II, the Spice Girls are hired as governesses by Baron Von Klapp-Trapp (Elton John)
SPORTS
By Lisa Dillman and Lisa Dillman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 28, 2005
PARIS - After a few more dismal showings in Grand Slam events - well, maybe even now - the former No. 1 women's tennis player will face this question: Didn't you used to be Venus Williams? Williams hasn't been close to her prime in years, and her loss yesterday in the third round of the French Open to a 15-year-old ranked barely inside the Top 100 had her looking the picture of abject failure. Williams hit seven double faults and committed 52 unforced errors in losing, 6-3, 1-6, 6-1, to Sesil Karatantcheva of Bulgaria, who dropped to the court after match point and later threw kisses and bowed to the crowd.
FEATURES
February 21, 2005
Writers Guild prizes go to `Sunshine,' `Sideways' Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind won the best original screenplay award for Charlie Kaufman Saturday night at the 57th Annual Writers Guild Awards. Best adapted screenplay went to Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor for Sideways. Other winners, for TV, included long-form adapted writing to Tony Kushner for Angels in America; episodic drama to "The Supremes" on West Wing; episodic comedy to "Pier Pressure" on Arrested Development and "Ida's Boyfriend" on Malcolm in the Middle; and daytime serial, The Guiding Light.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.