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Spice Cake

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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Jan Griffin from Cary, N.C., was looking for a recipe for the spice cake that used to be made and sold at A&P stores across the country many years ago. Carol Hannan from Kingsville sent in a recipe for an old-fashioned applesauce cake that she thinks is very similar in taste and appearance to the spice cake Griffin is looking for. She said she remembers the A&P cake well. Her recipe calls for nuts (she does not believe that the A&P cake had them, and she said the cake most certainly could be made without the nuts)
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Jan Griffin from Cary, N.C., was looking for a recipe for the spice cake that used to be made and sold at A&P stores across the country many years ago. Carol Hannan from Kingsville sent in a recipe for an old-fashioned applesauce cake that she thinks is very similar in taste and appearance to the spice cake Griffin is looking for. She said she remembers the A&P cake well. Her recipe calls for nuts (she does not believe that the A&P cake had them, and she said the cake most certainly could be made without the nuts)
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2007
Barbara Stowe of Haydenville, Mass., was looking for a recipe for Morning Glory Muffins. Joanne Calvert of Baltimore sent in a recipe for these dark and deliciously moist muffins that she says are a family favorite. They are full of healthful ingredients and reminded me of carrot cake. The batter can be made in advance and will keep well in the refrigerator overnight if you want to bake them first thing in the morning. They also freeze and reheat very well. There is no doubt that these delightful muffins would be a great start to any day. Morning Glory Muffins Makes 16 to 18 muffins 2 cups flour 1 1/4 cups sugar 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups grated carrots 1/2 cup raisins 1 apple, grated 1/2 cup coconut 3 eggs 1 cup oil 2 teaspoons vanilla Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Frances Louise German, a homemaker and volunteer who enjoyed collecting antiques, died Monday of heart failure at Morningside House, an Ellicott City assisted-living facility. The longtime Howard County resident was 91. The daughter of a farm laborer and a homemaker, Frances Louise Porter, who never used her first name, was born in Woodbine, Howard County. She attended a two-room schoolhouse in Woodbine, and later continued her education at a school in Lisbon. Her formal education ended in the ninth grade when she was attending Sykesville High School.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 9, 1997
IT WAS A LATE winter school day 38 years ago when Sister Marie Therese announced that as part of Lenten almsgiving, she was naming class leaders for the Bishops' Relief Fund. Before long, I realized that I was in charge of an hourlong charity fund-raiser. I was also 9 years old.I counted my blessings. My designated event was not to be the first of several held within the classroom. The kickoff event of these charity sessions was a bake sale headed by my friend, Danny Gonzalez, whose mother was a talented and resourceful baker.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
June Cummins of Touchet, Wash., wrote: "My sister and I are seeking a recipe for Sour Cream Cake that our mother made. It was made with real cream, soured, not the cultured kind we buy. "It was heavy and contained no shortening due to the cream and was frosted with brown sugar fudge-type frosting."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 21, 1990
Restaurants like Bowman are the good gray character actors, the Charles Durnings and Sada Thompsons, of the restaurant world. The stars may attract the press attention and the adulation of the designer-label crowd, but the supporting players keep plugging along, doing steady and reliable, if unflashy, work.This kind of unglamorous existence can be a lot more rewarding than it sounds. Fame is fickle, and a star can flame out as fast as it rises, but those workhorse restaurants, like their acting counterparts, seem to go on forever.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Frances Louise German, a homemaker and volunteer who enjoyed collecting antiques, died Monday of heart failure at Morningside House, an Ellicott City assisted-living facility. The longtime Howard County resident was 91. The daughter of a farm laborer and a homemaker, Frances Louise Porter, who never used her first name, was born in Woodbine, Howard County. She attended a two-room schoolhouse in Woodbine, and later continued her education at a school in Lisbon. Her formal education ended in the ninth grade when she was attending Sykesville High School.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | April 12, 1995
1-2-3-4 CakeMakes 16 servings3 cups all-purpose flour1 tablespoon baking powder1/8 teaspoon salt1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened2 cups sugar4 large eggs1 cup whole milk1 teaspoon pure vanilla extractHeat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour three 9-inch round cake pans. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt; set aside.Put the butter into a large mixing bowl. Beat with an electric mixer on high speed until the butter lightens in color, 2 minutes. Gradually add the sugar.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 19, 2000
A Harvest Cake recipe was the request of Ann M. McDonald of Baltimore, who wrote that the cake had apple slices and spices and was the favorite of her family. Doris K. Greene of Jarrettsville responded with a recipe. Harvest Cake Serves 12 4 cups peeled, diced tart apples 2 cups sugar 3 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon nutmeg 2 eggs 1 cup vegetable oil 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup chopped walnuts In a large mixing bowl, mix peeled, diced apples with the sugar.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2007
Barbara Stowe of Haydenville, Mass., was looking for a recipe for Morning Glory Muffins. Joanne Calvert of Baltimore sent in a recipe for these dark and deliciously moist muffins that she says are a family favorite. They are full of healthful ingredients and reminded me of carrot cake. The batter can be made in advance and will keep well in the refrigerator overnight if you want to bake them first thing in the morning. They also freeze and reheat very well. There is no doubt that these delightful muffins would be a great start to any day. Morning Glory Muffins Makes 16 to 18 muffins 2 cups flour 1 1/4 cups sugar 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 cups grated carrots 1/2 cup raisins 1 apple, grated 1/2 cup coconut 3 eggs 1 cup oil 2 teaspoons vanilla Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
June Cummins of Touchet, Wash., wrote: "My sister and I are seeking a recipe for Sour Cream Cake that our mother made. It was made with real cream, soured, not the cultured kind we buy. "It was heavy and contained no shortening due to the cream and was frosted with brown sugar fudge-type frosting."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 19, 2000
A Harvest Cake recipe was the request of Ann M. McDonald of Baltimore, who wrote that the cake had apple slices and spices and was the favorite of her family. Doris K. Greene of Jarrettsville responded with a recipe. Harvest Cake Serves 12 4 cups peeled, diced tart apples 2 cups sugar 3 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon nutmeg 2 eggs 1 cup vegetable oil 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup chopped walnuts In a large mixing bowl, mix peeled, diced apples with the sugar.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | March 9, 1997
IT WAS A LATE winter school day 38 years ago when Sister Marie Therese announced that as part of Lenten almsgiving, she was naming class leaders for the Bishops' Relief Fund. Before long, I realized that I was in charge of an hourlong charity fund-raiser. I was also 9 years old.I counted my blessings. My designated event was not to be the first of several held within the classroom. The kickoff event of these charity sessions was a bake sale headed by my friend, Danny Gonzalez, whose mother was a talented and resourceful baker.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | April 12, 1995
1-2-3-4 CakeMakes 16 servings3 cups all-purpose flour1 tablespoon baking powder1/8 teaspoon salt1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened2 cups sugar4 large eggs1 cup whole milk1 teaspoon pure vanilla extractHeat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour three 9-inch round cake pans. Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt; set aside.Put the butter into a large mixing bowl. Beat with an electric mixer on high speed until the butter lightens in color, 2 minutes. Gradually add the sugar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 21, 1990
Restaurants like Bowman are the good gray character actors, the Charles Durnings and Sada Thompsons, of the restaurant world. The stars may attract the press attention and the adulation of the designer-label crowd, but the supporting players keep plugging along, doing steady and reliable, if unflashy, work.This kind of unglamorous existence can be a lot more rewarding than it sounds. Fame is fickle, and a star can flame out as fast as it rises, but those workhorse restaurants, like their acting counterparts, seem to go on forever.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 19, 1997
The high cost of cake from mixWilliams-Sonoma's new cake mixes and frostings taste good. There's no disputing that. But you may suffer sticker shock when you realize what a finished cake costs you. One crystallized ginger spice cake mix: $9 -- it makes three 8-inch layers. Two jars of white chocolate ganache frosting: $9 each. (One jar frosts two 8-inch layers.) By the time you add eggs, buttermilk and unsalted butter, making the cake isn't exactly a quick process either.A side of salmonEtta MacKay from Olney, a k a the Salmon Lady, sells a fine holiday gift: Tobermory Scottish smoked Atlantic salmon (traditionally cured and single malt whisky cured)
NEWS
October 21, 2003
Helen W. Ricker, a retired secretary and homemaker, died of a spinal injury Thursday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 86. Helen Elizabeth Webster was born and raised on Deal Island, and after graduation from high school there she moved to Baltimore and attended Strayer Business College. Graduating from the business school in 1936, she began a 17-year career as a secretary for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. In 1942, she married Roger R. Ricker Jr. Her husband, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad employee, died in 1981.
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