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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
There are rules in movies like "Sphere."First, a small group of brilliant people, including one who's a little wacko, must confront the unknown using lots of blinking equipment and computers. As in, say, "The Abyss." Or "Sphere."Second, they have to be isolated by an unpredictable force. A tropical storm is good, as in, say, "Leviathan." Or "Sphere."Third, the unknown must start killing people off. If monsters are too obvious, horrors from the subconscious will work, as in, say, "Event Horizon."
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Aqua Sphere CEO Don Rockwell says he had no idea that Michael Phelps , the most decorated Olympic athlete of all time, would come out of retirement when the swimming equipment manufacturer sought earlier this year to partner with him. Talk about added value. "We would have been happy to have him" even if Phelps had not created a massive buzz in the sport by returning to competitive swimming, Rockwell said Tuesday. Phelps will compete in the U.S. Swimming Championships beginning Wednesday in Irvine, Calif.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 28, 2007
A reader in Westminster wondered why the dark portion of the moon is not always round: "The moon goes through its phases because the Earth blocks part of the light from the sun. So, one would expect the shadow always to reflect the shape of the Earth, no?" Oops. Back to school. Earth's round shadow touches the moon only during lunar eclipses. The phases change as the moon orbits Earth. The dark portion of the lunar sphere we see is simply the side facing away from the sun.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 19, 2014
America has a serious "we" problem -- as in, "Why should  we  pay for  them ?" The question is popping up all over the place. It underlies the debate over extending unemployment benefits to the long-term unemployed and providing food stamps to the poor. It's found in the resistance of some young and healthy people to being required to buy health insurance in order to help pay for people with pre-existing health problems. It can be heard among the residents of upscale neighborhoods who don't want their tax dollars going to the inhabitants of poorer neighborhoods nearby.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Renee Tawa and Renee Tawa,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2002
The rants are pulsing through the blog-o-sphere. On most days, would mean that the online community is in its usual state of trippy high drama. But this time, the topic is a radical expansion of the blog-o-sphere itself, one that would include a contingent of traditional journalists (the ones who write, as the lexicon has it, "dead-tree" pieces). In the quirky world known as the blog-o-sphere, hundreds of thousands of ordinary individuals run Web logs, or "blogs," interactive newsletters of sorts with bite-sized chunks of copy updated daily, or, in some extremes, several times an hour.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 18, 2000
NEW YORK -- On the Upper West Side of Manhattan, a remarkable new museum has been fashioned from the simplest of geometrical forms. Its exterior is a 12-story-high cube, with two outer walls made of colorless glass. Centered inside, as if it's floating on air, is a white aluminum sphere, 87 feet in diameter. The glass is so clear and the sphere is so large and luminous, especially at night, that it practically forces people to stop and look inside. The building is the Rose Center for Earth and Science, a $210 million exploratorium that opens tomorrow as the latest addition to the American Museum of Natural History.
NEWS
October 5, 2007
On the 50th anniversary of America's wake-up call to the Soviet missile threat, we wondered: Is the U.S. once again asleep as Russia rearms? Our next surprise might be more than a beeping sphere. On Oct. 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite into orbit. Sputnik was just a 184-pound sphere emitting a radio signal. But it changed the perceived balance of power and may have elected a president. Our next leader may be faced with another new crisis by a new Russia armed with state-of-the-art weaponry and ambitions reflected in its recent planting of a flag on the Arctic floor to buzzing the U.S. with a revamped strategic bomber fleet.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2000
If only the bank had lasted as long as the safe. First National Bank of Hampstead opened in 1910 and closed during the Great Depression. But the 6,000-pound cannonball pedestal safe sat there until last week, when a demolition crew hauled it away to make room for a new police station. After protecting money and treasures for decades, the elegant sphere could end up as scrap metal unless someone comes forward with a very strong concrete slab and a lot of cash to haul the safe. "There's no place in town we can put it," said Hampstead Town Manager Kenneth Decker.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
First, there's the "Wow!" factor. Visitors to the darkened Science on a Sphere Theater at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt are immediately awed by the glowing "planet" that appears to float three feet off the floor, spinning slowly in space. "Oooh! Neat!" gushed a gaggle of second-graders from Crofton as they crowded the rail protecting the eerie, 6-foot orb. As they watched, it transformed magically from a majestic, blue-green Earth to a rusty, barren Mars. A few youngsters reached out to see if it was solid, or an illusion of light -- a hologram.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2000
NEW YORK -- It happens to everyone. You awaken from a deep sleep, and for a few long seconds, you grope for a clue to where you are and what day it is. In a similar way, most people go about their daily lives with few clues to where they really are in the vastness of space, or in the long march of time. For too many, the meager stars in the urban night sky are the universe, and the dawn of time was way back when dinosaurs ruled the world. Not even close. In an effort to shake us awake to the astonishing realities of space and time -- at least as modern science understands them -- the American Museum of Natural History in New York has created the Rose Center for Earth and Space.
NEWS
By Irwin E. Weiss | March 14, 2012
Much has been written and said recently about the First Amendment and freedom of religion in the context of the current political atmosphere. Many of the most provocative comments have been about contraception, abortion rights and health insurance. Some politicians and pundits claim that President Barack Obama is attacking religion or religious institutions. Presidential hopeful Rick Santorum stoked the fires by criticizing the 1960 speech given by John F. Kennedy when he ran for president.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
Scientists from the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center have found that the simplest experiments can easily engage a child's curiosity and just might spark an interest in chemistry, physics or biology. They take their lab to schools and libraries to give children hands-on experiences. A demonstration at the Bel Air Library last week involved the creation of polymer balls. Place one tablespoon each of liquid vinyl and rubbing alcohol in a cup and stir rigorously with a wooden spoon for at least five minutes.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 5, 2008
At a tire store the other day, I had the misfortune of coming face-to-face with the bane of modern society: the self-absorbed yakker. Let's face it, there's not a whole lot to do when they're putting new tires on your car except sit in the waiting room and drink bad coffee and read back issues of Motor Trend. Another man was waiting for his car, too. He said his name was Bill. So we started talking. No, check that. He started talking. First he talked about his job in sales and how well that was going and how he was pretty much rolling in dough.
NEWS
October 5, 2007
On the 50th anniversary of America's wake-up call to the Soviet missile threat, we wondered: Is the U.S. once again asleep as Russia rearms? Our next surprise might be more than a beeping sphere. On Oct. 4, 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first artificial satellite into orbit. Sputnik was just a 184-pound sphere emitting a radio signal. But it changed the perceived balance of power and may have elected a president. Our next leader may be faced with another new crisis by a new Russia armed with state-of-the-art weaponry and ambitions reflected in its recent planting of a flag on the Arctic floor to buzzing the U.S. with a revamped strategic bomber fleet.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | June 28, 2007
A reader in Westminster wondered why the dark portion of the moon is not always round: "The moon goes through its phases because the Earth blocks part of the light from the sun. So, one would expect the shadow always to reflect the shape of the Earth, no?" Oops. Back to school. Earth's round shadow touches the moon only during lunar eclipses. The phases change as the moon orbits Earth. The dark portion of the lunar sphere we see is simply the side facing away from the sun.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | March 29, 2007
To open its Explorer Series last November, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra had the benefit of an exceedingly engaging expert on exploration -- Mario Livio. This senior astrophysicist at the Johns Hopkins University's Hubble Space Telescope Science Institute gave the audience an introduction into the nature of nebula and other galactic phenomena. Astonishing images of such things, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and chosen by Livio, were then shown as counterpoint to a performance of a gripping work by Christopher Theofanidis called Rainbow Body.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 19, 2014
America has a serious "we" problem -- as in, "Why should  we  pay for  them ?" The question is popping up all over the place. It underlies the debate over extending unemployment benefits to the long-term unemployed and providing food stamps to the poor. It's found in the resistance of some young and healthy people to being required to buy health insurance in order to help pay for people with pre-existing health problems. It can be heard among the residents of upscale neighborhoods who don't want their tax dollars going to the inhabitants of poorer neighborhoods nearby.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 24, 1998
A university sophomore in England, corresponding by e-mail, volunteered advice to the two American astronomers with a knack for finding planets around stars beyond our solar system: Focus their planet search on 30 overlooked stars and they might HTC make further discoveries.The astronomers agreed to look with the powerful Keck Observatory telescope in Hawaii. Sure enough, orbiting one of the student's candidate stars, 154 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus and designated HD187123, is a planet the size of Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 2007
OTTAWA -- Executives who are longtime BlackBerry users will have to teach their right thumb some new tricks if they switch to a model introduced Monday. The model, the BlackBerry 8800, eliminates a tiny scroll wheel on the side that is intended to navigate through lists of e-mail messages. The plastic wheel has been a signature feature of all business-oriented BlackBerrys since the first model was released eight years ago. In its place on the 8800 is a small front-mounted navigation ball developed for the BlackBerry Pearl, a consumer model released last year.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
First, there's the "Wow!" factor. Visitors to the darkened Science on a Sphere Theater at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt are immediately awed by the glowing "planet" that appears to float three feet off the floor, spinning slowly in space. "Oooh! Neat!" gushed a gaggle of second-graders from Crofton as they crowded the rail protecting the eerie, 6-foot orb. As they watched, it transformed magically from a majestic, blue-green Earth to a rusty, barren Mars. A few youngsters reached out to see if it was solid, or an illusion of light -- a hologram.
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