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NEWS
June 9, 2006
Reproduction Sperm less potent as men get older Many women complain that they have decreasing fertility to look forward to as they age, while men keep their reproductive capabilities intact. But it turns out that aging men may have their own biological clock. As they collect years, their sperm collects DNA damage and abnormalities that can contribute to infertility and unsuccessful pregnancies, according to new research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif., and at the University of California, Berkeley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By McKay Jenkins and McKay Jenkins,Special to the Sun | June 19, 2005
The Genius Factory: The Curious History of the Nobel Prize Sperm Bank By David Plotz. Random House. Random House, 288 pages, $24.95. The idea had a certain eccentric appeal: asking the world's smartest men to donate sperm for the evolutionary betterment of mankind. But it also represented certain drawbacks, and not just the image of Nobel Prize winners walking down hallways with plastic cups and Playboys. There were also inevitable fears about the creation of a genetically engineered master race.
NEWS
By Marla Cone and Marla Cone,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2005
Scientists studying the human effects of hormone-mimicking chemicals have reported that compounds called phthalates used in plastics and beauty products, and widely found in people, seem to alter reproductive organs of baby boys. In the first study of humans exposed in the womb to phthalates, the researchers, who examined the genitalia of male babies and toddlers, found a strong relationship between the chemicals and subtle changes in the size and anatomy of their genitals. Phthalates are ubiquitous compounds used as softeners in plastics and to maintain color and fragrance in beauty products such as nail polish and perfume, among other uses.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2005
The birth control pill was no longer an option for Jim Segermark's wife, and undergoing a vasectomy himself seemed nothing short of barbaric. So, a few years ago, the 42-year-old father of two from Minnesota devised a new male contraceptive device: a tiny implantable clip that blocks the flow of sperm - without cutting or cauterizing a man's plumbing. "We don't have to cut you," said Segermark, a medical supply company owner who was also the first patient to have the Vasclips attached to his vas deferens tubes.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - Before he ships out for the Persian Gulf to fight a possible war with Iraq, Navy engineer James Erler is taking care of a long to-do list: He needs to fix things around the house, put the family finances in order, run some last-minute errands. And, while he's out, pay a quick visit to the sperm bank. As tens of thousands of troops receive orders to deploy to the Middle East, U.S. servicemen are finding time for an unconventional errand - one that takes Norman Rockwell images of a soldier's farewell and gives them a 21st-century twist.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 12, 2002
Men living in agricultural mid-Missouri are markedly less fertile than men living in New York, Minneapolis and Los Angeles, researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia have found. The researchers suspect that runoff from farm chemicals may be to blame. The results "are important to couples that are trying to conceive," said research professor Shanna Swan, who led the study. "If we can find out what specific exposures were related to this reduced semen quality, we might be able to prevent delays in conception in the future."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
Will the stork one day be joined by the mouse in the baby business? A team of American and German scientists has for the first time coaxed mice into producing the sperm of distantly related barnyard animals. The research, described today in the British journal Nature, raises hope that the technique might someday provide new options for everyone from cancer patients rendered infertile by chemotherapy to zookeepers trying to bring back endangered species. During the past decade, scientists have successfully transplanted sperm-producing cells from rodents such as rats and hamsters into mice, which then began producing sperm from the donor animal.
FEATURES
By Dru Sefton and Dru Sefton,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 1, 1999
Be forewarned: What you are about to read may or may not be real. Today is, after all, April Fools' Day. And this is an interview with an expert fooler. That would be one Joey Skaggs, New York painter, sculptor and satirist. For 30 years he has been duping the media. He sees it as effective social commentary. Not to mention huge fun. A few of Skaggs' more infamous pranks: Hippie tour, 1968: After tourists started cruising the East Village to gawk at hippies, Skaggs put 60 hippies in a bus for a tour of suburban Queens.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 9, 1998
With an announcement that is already producing applause and hand-wringing, doctors at a fertility center near Washington will report today that they can substantially stack the odds that a couple can have a baby of the sex they choose.The method, developed by the Genetics & IVF Institute in Fairfax, Va., involves sorting sperm by the amount of DNA they contain and then using them for artificial insemination.It capitalizes on the fact that there is only one difference between sperm that carry the Y chromosome, which produces males, and those with an X-chromosome, which produces females: Sperm with a Y chromosome have about 2.8 percent less genetic material.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 15, 1997
CHICAGO -- Julie Garber, a California real estate developer, was 28 when she succumbed last December to acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Her death left her parents inconsolable."
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