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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Mystery writers know the secret to winning readers is creating winning characters who can move from case to case, book to book -- and occasionally even into a continuing life on television.Remember "Spenser: For Hire"? Like Erle Stanley Gardner's seemingly eternal "Perry Mason," novelist Robert B. Parker's wry, gourmet-cook private eye returns from series cancellation in a new movie, "Spenser: Ceremony," at 9 o'clock tonight on the Lifetime cable network.Robert Urich re-creates his role from the 1985 to 1988 ABC series (which was repeated on Lifetime from 1989 through 1992)
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  PENURIOUS  You can be poor, penniless, strapped, hard up, skint , or stony broke. But if you want to add a Latinate dignity to your impoverishment, you could be penurious  (pronounced puh-NOOR-e-us). It comes from the Latin penuria , "want," "need," from which we also get penury , "poverty.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | May 21, 2000
After a long day of exchanges with co-workers, few pleasures can match the combined satisfactions of a comfortable chair, a good light, a snack or drink within reach, and a book in which disagreeable people meet violent death. Thanks to the indefatigable industry of mystery writers, and the inexhaustible optimism of their publishers, whole forests fall to pulp to allow readers to plunge vicariously into darkness. The dozens produced each year offer all imaginable categories -- historical settings, exotic locales, English maiden ladies, West Coast tough guys -- with veteran writers adding another notch to a series and tyros imitating previous successes.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Write about language, as about climate change or evolution, and what do you get? A strident chorus of denial. I wonder why. Last week Tom Chivers wrote about English grammar at The Telegraph , patiently explaining why a good deal of what has been taught about grammar is unsound and what linguists, Geoffrey Pullum in particular, have discovered in examining how we speak and write. ( "Are grammar Nazis ruining the English language?" was an unfortunate headline, overstating the case and using the inflammatory Nazi , but we'll pass on.)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 17, 1999
If you like your men in frilly aprons with a snub-nose .38 holstered on the belt, has A&E got someone for you.Spenser, Robert B. Parker's tough-talking private eye with a penchant for quoting the Great Books, is back in "Small Vices," a deliciously parboiled, modern-day, made-for-cable film noir premiering tomorrow night at 8 on the Arts & Entertainment channel.Joe Mantegna, who will next be seen in Barry Levinson's movie "Liberty Heights," plays Spenser. And while readers of the "Spenser" books might find him a little small for the role, he more than makes up for it in attitude and screen presence.
NEWS
January 20, 2010
ROBERT B. PARKER, 77 Crime novelist created 'Spenser' series Robert B. Parker, the blunt and beloved crime novelist who helped revive and modernize the hard-boiled genre and branded a tough guy of his own through his "Spenser" series, died Monday of unknown causes at his Cambridge, Mass., home. Prolific to the end, Mr. Parker wrote more than 50 novels, including 37 featuring Boston private eye Spenser. The character's first name was a mystery, with his last name emphatically spelled with an "s" in the middle, not a "c."
NEWS
January 20, 2010
ROBERT B. PARKER, 77 Crime novelist created 'Spenser' series Robert B. Parker, the blunt and beloved crime novelist who helped revive and modernize the hard-boiled genre and branded a tough guy of his own through his "Spenser" series, died Monday of unknown causes at his Cambridge, Mass., home. Prolific to the end, Mr. Parker wrote more than 50 novels, including 37 featuring Boston private eye Spenser. The character's first name was a mystery, with his last name emphatically spelled with an "s" in the middle, not a "c."
FEATURES
By Gregory N. Krolczyk and Gregory N. Krolczyk,Contributing Writer | May 17, 1993
Somebody killed Olivia Nelson just outside her aristocratic Beacon Hill home. The killer used a framing hammer, which had a nice, long wooden handle for added leverage, hitting her in the head at least five times. The police asked all the right people all the right questions, and all they got for their trouble was phone calls warning them to either solve it or drop it. Apparently, Boston's upper crust didn't like cops nosing around.Dismayed by the police's lack of progress, Nelson's husband, Loudon Tripp, asks Lieutenant Quirk to suggest an alternative, someone who could hunt down the killer and bring him to justice.
FEATURES
By Gregory N. Krolczyk and Gregory N. Krolczyk,Special to The Sun | June 28, 1994
Port City was a small waterfront town whose heyday had long ago come and gone. Yet, despite this fall from prosperity, there was enough old Anglo money to maintain an oasis separate from the Chinese and Portuguese people who populated the area.Part of this oasis was the Port City Theatre Company, of which Dr. Susan Silverman was a board member. As such, it was only natural that, when the artistic director of the theater company contended he was being stalked, Spenser was brought in (gratis, of course)
NEWS
By Gregory Krolczyk | July 12, 1992
DOUBLE DEUCE.Robert B. Parker.Putnam.tTC 224 pages. $19.95."You working on anything?" Hawk said."I was thinking about breakfast," I said."I might need some support," Hawk said."
NEWS
January 20, 2010
ROBERT B. PARKER, 77 Crime novelist created 'Spenser' series Robert B. Parker, the blunt and beloved crime novelist who helped revive and modernize the hard-boiled genre and branded a tough guy of his own through his "Spenser" series, died Monday of unknown causes at his Cambridge, Mass., home. Prolific to the end, Mr. Parker wrote more than 50 novels, including 37 featuring Boston private eye Spenser. The character's first name was a mystery, with his last name emphatically spelled with an "s" in the middle, not a "c."
NEWS
January 20, 2010
ROBERT B. PARKER, 77 Crime novelist created 'Spenser' series Robert B. Parker, the blunt and beloved crime novelist who helped revive and modernize the hard-boiled genre and branded a tough guy of his own through his "Spenser" series, died Monday of unknown causes at his Cambridge, Mass., home. Prolific to the end, Mr. Parker wrote more than 50 novels, including 37 featuring Boston private eye Spenser. The character's first name was a mystery, with his last name emphatically spelled with an "s" in the middle, not a "c."
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 2004
TWO-YEAR-olds at Children and Company Preschool dipped their hands in paint two weeks ago and left handprints on 15 fabric squares. The squares - along with about 1,000 others collected from schools and businesses - will be quilted together to make blankets for premature babies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) around Maryland. The activity was part of the Caring Hands project sponsored by Spenser's Hope, a nonprofit organization that offers information and support to families experiencing early labor and premature birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Special to the Sun | March 23, 2003
The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, now part of our emotional landscape, have influenced the new mysteries reviewed below. In some, it's a direct link; in others, it's merely an acknowledgement of the real world. Either way, there's extra resonance to the clash between good and evil. Harry Bosch is back. Like his creator, he never disappoints. In Lost Light (Little, Brown, 368 pages, $25.95), Michael Connelly ventures into new territory by having the taciturn Bosch narrate the story.
NEWS
May 24, 2001
An interview with Holly Gillum, founding member of Longfellow Nursery School Book Club . How many members does your club have? I think there's probably 15 of us on paper, and maybe between eight and 12 show up in a given month. A lot of the moms in the group - their kids are graduating out of the preschool, but we're just gonna stay a group. It's sort of taken on its own little thing. What book are members reading this month? This month, we're doing "Daughter of Fortune" by Isabel Allende.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | May 21, 2000
After a long day of exchanges with co-workers, few pleasures can match the combined satisfactions of a comfortable chair, a good light, a snack or drink within reach, and a book in which disagreeable people meet violent death. Thanks to the indefatigable industry of mystery writers, and the inexhaustible optimism of their publishers, whole forests fall to pulp to allow readers to plunge vicariously into darkness. The dozens produced each year offer all imaginable categories -- historical settings, exotic locales, English maiden ladies, West Coast tough guys -- with veteran writers adding another notch to a series and tyros imitating previous successes.
NEWS
By Gregory N. Krolczyk | June 30, 1991
His name is Paul Giacomin. He is 24 years old. He is looking for the mother he left behind many years ago. Unable to find anything but dead-ends, Paul calls on the man who helped him long ago when he needed to get away from his parents: Spenser.His name is Luke. He's about 8 years old. He killed his foste brother. The D.A. wants to send him to jail. Others, those who are hiding him, know that Luke is just as much a victim as the baby he killed. They know whom to turn to to help them get their proof: Burke.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 2004
TWO-YEAR-olds at Children and Company Preschool dipped their hands in paint two weeks ago and left handprints on 15 fabric squares. The squares - along with about 1,000 others collected from schools and businesses - will be quilted together to make blankets for premature babies in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) around Maryland. The activity was part of the Caring Hands project sponsored by Spenser's Hope, a nonprofit organization that offers information and support to families experiencing early labor and premature birth.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 17, 1999
If you like your men in frilly aprons with a snub-nose .38 holstered on the belt, has A&E got someone for you.Spenser, Robert B. Parker's tough-talking private eye with a penchant for quoting the Great Books, is back in "Small Vices," a deliciously parboiled, modern-day, made-for-cable film noir premiering tomorrow night at 8 on the Arts & Entertainment channel.Joe Mantegna, who will next be seen in Barry Levinson's movie "Liberty Heights," plays Spenser. And while readers of the "Spenser" books might find him a little small for the role, he more than makes up for it in attitude and screen presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | February 28, 1999
A disquieting novel from South Africa rich in myth, magic and horror; a story collection of abiding wit; a tried-and-true detective story with an academic multicultural setting and Spenser at the helm; an exotic post-colonial send-up by an American; an identity saga set on an Indonesian island medical school -- these intriguing works of fiction will tame the icy winds of early spring. In "Devil's Valley" (Harcourt Brace & Co., 416 pages, $24), the distinguished South African novelist Andre Brink invades the origins of Boer culture finding in a no-man's-land of inbred whites the origins of what became Apartheid.
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