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NEWS
By Julie Scharper | June 4, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young plans to unveil a plan Monday that he says will prevent fire companies and recreation centers from closing, double funding for youth summer jobs and after-school programs and lessen the cost of planned cuts to health benefits for employees and retirees. “My 'Plan for a Better Baltimore' builds on the mayor's goal to grow Baltimore by 10,000 families over the next decade by investing in services that save lives and will help to attract and retain residents,” Young said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
After the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore opens later this year, the city needs to figure out how to spend an estimated windfall of at least $15 million a year meant for the neighborhoods around the casino. Officials and community members said they want to find "big, game-changing ideas" that can make the money an engine for economic development in the communities affected by the new gambling facility. "I hope that we are extremely creative and visionary in how we approach these questions and we don't limit ourselves to traditional expenditures," said State Senator Bill Ferguson, who chairs the local development council that will advise the administration on the spending.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
After the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore opens later this year, the city needs to figure out how to spend an estimated windfall of at least $15 million a year meant for the neighborhoods around the casino. Officials and community members said they want to find "big, game-changing ideas" that can make the money an engine for economic development in the communities affected by the new gambling facility. "I hope that we are extremely creative and visionary in how we approach these questions and we don't limit ourselves to traditional expenditures," said State Senator Bill Ferguson, who chairs the local development council that will advise the administration on the spending.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Maryland House Republicans offered an alternative to Gov. Martin O'Malley's spending plan Tuesday, suggesting the state limit spending to 1 percent above last year. The minority caucus, dramatically outnumbered in the House of Delegates, push an alternative budget every year. This year, House Republicans criticized the governor and state Democrats for diverting some pension payments to help plug budget gaps and for increasing state spending by 5 percent over last year.  During an Annapolis press conference, several Republican delegates criticized the term-limited governor for the the growth of state spending during his tenure.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed budget was assailed on many fronts Wednesday as county executives, education advocates, Maryland hospitals and Republican leaders began making their case against the $36 billion spending plan. Some said cuts in payments to Medicaid providers would lead to higher medical bills for everyone else. Others argued that shifting $240 million in teacher pension costs to the counties would inevitably require cuts to community services - and schools. Even some leading Democrats in the General Assembly said the governor's proposal to increase income taxes on the top 20 percent of Maryland wage earners would hit people who don't earn enough to afford it. Republicans were more blunt.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | March 16, 2010
A Senate panel took the first bite out of Gov. Martin O'Malley's $13 billion general fund spending plan Monday night, voting to remove an estimated $150 million, mostly from small snips to hundreds of education and health programs. "We tried to do the appropriate thing," said Sen. Edward J. Kasemeyer, who chairs the Health, Education and Human Resources Subcommittee. "We could have taken more." Cuts included a $6.2 million reduction in funding for stem cell research. Senators also eliminated some health-related agency positions, but protected funds for a number of scholarship programs.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2002
Republican state delegates charged yesterday that Gov. Parris N. Glendening's budget has so many problems that it should be rejected out of hand and sent back to him for reworking. "The budget is masterful in its deceit, and it violates the spirit of the constitution that requires a balanced budget," said Del. Alfred W. Redmer Jr., a Baltimore County Republican and House minority leader. "Let's send it back and get it right the first time." The Republican caucus members said that they would seek to exercise an obscure parliamentary rule to bring a bill directly out of committee and to a vote of the full House.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon has proposed borrowing $15 million, eliminating 17 vacant positions and scaling back a street-cleaning contract to compensate for a $26.5 million reduction in state aid. A city budget adopted by the Board of Estimates Wednesday leaves in place service cuts announced earlier by the mayor, such as shortening pool hours and closing child care and recreation centers. Dixon revised her spending plan after the General Assembly balanced the state budget partly by keeping $160 million in highway money that was intended to be distributed to local governments.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | February 12, 1992
Yesterday, they joked in school offices that the cover on the superintendent's proposed $112.28 million spending plan for fiscal 1993 waspurple so it wouldn't show any bleeding.Unveiled to 35 citizens last night during a 75-minute public hearing at Spring Garden Elementary, Superintendent R. Edward Shilling's proposed budget calls for the 22,500-student district to spend $5.15 million more next year.Nearly all categories of spending, from administration to instructional salaries, will be increased -- anywhere from 1 to 12.7 percent.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2000
Don't touch our stuff. That's the message dozens of Baltimore County residents sent to the County Council last night at a largely tranquil public hearing on a proposed $1.79 billion spending plan for the coming fiscal year. At a time when county coffers are brimming with a surplus expected to reach $85 million, County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger found something for everybody in the budget proposal he unveiled earlier this month. The plan includes money for everything from comfortable chairs for the lobbies of senior citizen centers to classroom listening devices for special-needs students to pay raises for teachers.
NEWS
January 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley's final budget proposal leaves the state on a sounder fiscal footing than when he took office seven years ago. Though he will not bequeath his successor anything close to the hefty fund balance his predecessor, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., left for him, he will also not saddle the next governor with anything like the projected billion-dollar annual budget shortfalls he faced. And Mr. O'Malley has generally resisted the urge to lard up the election year budget with unaffordable goodies that will help his allies at the ballot box. That said, his final spending plan avoids some of the hard decisions that will ultimately be needed to eliminate for good the state's gap between expenditures and revenues, and it continues a pattern that will limit the next governor's ability to cut taxes or expand services.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
State lawmakers will have to address a combined budget gap of $580 million over the next 18 months when they reconvene in January. The state's chief analyst on Wednesday described the problem as relatively small given the nearly $2 billion shortfall the state grappled with in recent years. "We are starting in a small hole, certainly compared to what we have seen in the past," Warren Deschenaux, director of the office of policy analysis in the Department of Legislative Services, said to the Spending Affordability Committee.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Baltimore residents will pay less in property taxes but more in stormwater and taxi fees under a $2.4 billion budget approved by the City Council on Monday. The cut will reduce the property tax payments on a home valued at $200,000 by about $140. But the same resident will pay $40 to $120 for stormwater cleanup and a 25-cent fee on each taxi ride - with another water bill hike on the horizon. The result? The cost of living in Baltimore could go up for many people. "Hopefully, it'll be a wash for residents," said Councilman Robert W. Curran, who represents Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
The Howard County Council adopted a $923.5 million general fund spending plan Thursday that increases allocations for schools and police while not raising income or property taxes. The council voted 4-1 to approve the budget, roughly $2.7 million higher than the proposal made a month ago by County Executive Ken Ulman. The dissenting vote was cast by Councilman Greg Fox, the council's lone Republican, who criticized spending practices several times during the two-hour session. Fox wrapped up his remarks after the vote with a display of black, pointy wizard hats, each representing a new fund that he said appears suddenly, as if by magic, every year in the budget while some basic needs go unfunded.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff reports | April 16, 2013
The budget package proposed by Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz this week includes $5.6 million to finish a Perry Hall park that officials say has languished for years. Improvements to Gough Park, a 17-acre site at the intersection of the intersection of Honeygo Boulevard and East Joppa Road, will include a new gymnasium. The county bought the land in 2000, but "the land has sat idle," said County Councilman David Marks, a Republican who lives in Perry Hall. With continuing development in Perry Hall, Marks said the site will provide residents with a "green space in a growing community.
NEWS
January 17, 2013
Amid the boasting typical of a governor's budget proposal, Gov. Martin O'Malley's new spending plan includes this peculiar claim to fame: The O'Malley administration has managed to effectively eliminate Maryland's structural budget deficit not just once but two times. This is a bit like bragging that you've married the same person twice - it suggests you've gotten to the right place in the end but glosses over some unpleasantness in the middle. The fiscal unpleasantness, in Mr. O'Malley's case, was particularly severe, and to be fair, not really his fault.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1995
Baltimore's school board amended its original budget request yesterday, adding new programs for disruptive students.After shifting $1.7 million to school-safety programs, the board approved a $646 million spending plan that is 2.3 percent larger than this year's budget.The proposed budget for school year 1995-1996 now includes $900,000 for the creation of six "presuspension centers," $600,000 less than school administrators say they need to launch their programs for counseling and teaching students with behavior problems.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- The Montgomery County Council, often accused of being dominated by tax-and-spend liberals, did a little less of both in approving a $2.6 billion budget for fiscal year 2000.The council gave County Executive Douglas Duncan almost all the money he asked for in March, but trimmed $2.6 million from his proposed spending plan. It also passed along to taxpayers a series of small cuts totaling $7 million in the first year, and increasing to $24 million after three years.The fiscal spending plan is 7 percent above the current year, but 1 percent below a spending cap the council set last month.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Baltimore County classrooms would have about 100 more teachers next school year under a budget proposal unveiled Tuesday by Superintendent Dallas Dance. In his first spending plan since taking the post, Dance presented a $1.3 billion operating budget to the county school board, saying a top priority will be managing growth in the school system of 107,000 students. Dance, who became superintendent this summer, is advocating spending about $4.7 million on additional teachers because of projected increases in student enrollment.
NEWS
June 22, 2012
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young had a radical thought: that the city's legislative body might actually live up to its role as a co-equal branch of government and exercise some influence in how Baltimore will spend $2.3 billion in the next fiscal year. Not every suggestion he made for what spending should be cut, what new funds should be used and what additional spending should be authorized was good. But his main priority — freeing up additional funds for recreation centers, after school programs and other youth services — was certainly valid.
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