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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Advancing a pivotal step toward the possible appointment of an independent prosecutor to investigate campaign finance abuses, Attorney General Janet Reno has ordered a 90-day inquiry into whether President Clinton circumvented federal election laws in 1996.Reno's decision yesterday marked the third time in less than two weeks that the Justice Department has begun a 90-day independent-counsel inquiry into allegations of election improprieties -- this one into whether Clinton illegally benefited from Democratic advertisements during the presidential campaign.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
A 28-year-old Marine veteran who announced this week he is running in Maryland's 6th Congressional District is calling on the well-financed Democratic incumbent in that district to limit campaign spending to $500,000. David E. Vogt III of Brunswick is seeking to reclaim for Republicans the district Democratic Rep. John Delaney won last year by beating longtime GOP incumbent Roscoe G. Bartlett. Vogt, now a full-time graduate student, has not previously run for political office. Delaney spent $4.1 million in his campaign last year -- roughly half of it his own money.
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2001
Trying to rally public support for his embattled spending plan, Gov. Parris N. Glendening embarked yesterday on a weeklong tour of Maryland to promote his budget proposals for higher education, the environment and mass transit. "I feel very strongly about these things," Glendening said yesterday after an event at Anne Arundel Community College. "Part of the responsibility of the governor is to set priorities, and I have set priorities with my budget. These things should not be cut." Glendening launched the public campaign to save his budget during a week when the House of Delegates is expected to take up recommendations for large cuts to some of his top initiatives.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
Nine months before the first votes are cast and at a time when almost no one outside the political industry is paying attention, a crowded field of presidential contenders is being thinned on the basis of the candidates' ability to raise money. In theory, that's a fair test of an appealing campaign message - and the good news for democracy is that the presumed front-runners in both parties no longer look like prohibitive favorites so far in advance of Election Day. But the extraordinary dollar chase has so dominated the campaigns so far that candidates have little time for anything else.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Campaign finance legislation may die in the Senate this week if Democrats cannot find a way to win a few Republican votes by modifying the bill's provisions for public financing of elections.The issue that seemed the rage last fall when Ross Perot denounced the money in the political system has been stalled in the Senate. And even if legislation to limit spending and curb political action committees survives the Senate, it faces a difficult future in the rest of the legislative process.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In what has become an annual rite of futility, the Senate began to grapple with a new plan to overhaul campaign finance laws yesterday, pitting Democrats against Republicans in a clash with far-reaching political ramifications.For the past six years, both sides have fought over proposals to halt the breathless growth of campaign expenditures and to reform the methods by which lawmakers raise campaign funds. All efforts have ended in stalemate.The Democrats' latest contribution to the debate came yesterday, when they scaled back an earlier proposal to provide government funding to candidates who observe voluntary spending limits.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Breaking with a nearly 30-year tradition, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean announced yesterday that he would become the first Democratic presidential candidate ever to opt out of the system for publicly financing elections. Speaking to supporters in Vermont, Dean said that only by rejecting public financing - and the spending limits it imposes - could he compete financially with President Bush if he wins the Democratic nomination. Bush has rejected public financing and is aiming to raise at least $175 million by the Republican National Convention in September.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court will take up states' rights - of both the blue- and red-state variety - in a pair of election-law cases to be heard this week that could have major effects on the future of American politics. Vermont, a true blue state, hopes to restore small-town democracy by greatly limiting the role of money in politics. If its new spending limits win before the high court, they could change how campaigns are conducted across the nation. Meanwhile, Texas, the most populous of the red states, is defending its right to redraw its electoral districts to give its Republican majority more seats in Congress.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein and Thomas W. Waldron and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
Gov. Parris N. Glendening and legislative leaders are crafting an education aid package that would send an extra $22 million to local school systems next year, although key details over how to spend the money are unresolved. The proposal falls far short of what education advocates have called for to address a variety of needs, including a proposed $49 million intervention program to help students prepare for competency tests. It also seems certain that any final package will not include most of the nearly $50 million sought by Baltimore officials for the city's beleaguered school system.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- House Democrats fired a new campaign season salvo at the GOP yesterday, unveiling their latest proposal to overhaul the manner in which political campaigns are financed.The plan, which would provide public financing for congressional candidates who agreed to observe voluntary spending limits, echoed proposals unsuccessfully advanced by Democrats throughout the past half-decade.But yesterday's announcement was tailored to capitalize on the recent wave of public discontent with Congress -- a discontent that has launched a national drive for mandatory term limits on congressional careers.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court will take up states' rights - of both the blue- and red-state variety - in a pair of election-law cases to be heard this week that could have major effects on the future of American politics. Vermont, a true blue state, hopes to restore small-town democracy by greatly limiting the role of money in politics. If its new spending limits win before the high court, they could change how campaigns are conducted across the nation. Meanwhile, Texas, the most populous of the red states, is defending its right to redraw its electoral districts to give its Republican majority more seats in Congress.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to reconsider the free-speech rule that allows candidates to spend unlimited money to win election to public office. The campaign finance case is among 11 the justices agreed to take up after meeting behind closed doors Monday to go over more than 1,700 appeals that have awaited action since June. They include an Ohio case that tests whether states can offer huge tax breaks to corporations to lure them to build plants. Last year, a U.S. appeals court said these special tax breaks are unconstitutional.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2005
The severe spending restrictions that Baltimore school officials imposed two years ago amid a financial crisis would be eased under a $1 billion spending plan proposed last night by city schools chief Bonnie S. Copeland. Having reduced a $58 million budget deficit to $23 million by this summer, the school system would begin to restore some of the programs and jobs it had eliminated. Pupils in certain grades would see slightly smaller class sizes, more support staff in schools and new textbooks, and summer school would resume for more than a third of the city's children.
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2004
BOSTON - The Democratic Party is preparing to spend at least $6 million on television commercials starting this weekend, sources said, a critical boost to presidential nominee John Kerry as he suspends his own TV advertising next month to hoard cash for the fall. The advertisements, targeting more than a dozen competitive states, will be the Democratic National Committee's first foray into a fierce general election battle zone. They will also help magnify the publicity Kerry generates from his speech tonight accepting his party's presidential nomination.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2004
Like soldiers picking their way through a minefield, Howard County's school board members must decide tomorrow on a budget path through the next fiscal year that could anger county teachers, violate County Executive James N. Robey's spending limits or cut $23 million requested for programs. "That's where we are. We're still struggling," Courtney Watson, the school board chairman, told the County Council yesterday at a meeting in the George Howard Building in Ellicott City. The problem is clear.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush will propose a $2.3 trillion budget tomorrow that backs away from some of the major spending and tax initiatives he supported in previous years, administration officials say. Constrained by large budget deficits and political realities, the officials said they would retreat on some of their ideas and oppose others that are favored by Republicans in Congress. Instead, Bush will try to lock in some of his previous victories. He will press Congress to permanently extend most of the tax cuts adopted in the past three years, which are scheduled to expire over the next seven years.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 2, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, long opposed to mandatory campaign spending caps, cleared the way yesterday for states to use generous public subsidies to entice candidates to accept voluntary limits and to pressure candidates who refuse to agree to limits.A Kentucky public financing scheme that goes further than most states have gone withstood a constitutional challenge when the court, without comment, turned down two appeals on the issue.The Supreme Court ruled 23 years ago that it is unconstitutional to impose a direct spending limit on political candidates, prompting states to look for indirect means to curb campaign outlays.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
Nine months before the first votes are cast and at a time when almost no one outside the political industry is paying attention, a crowded field of presidential contenders is being thinned on the basis of the candidates' ability to raise money. In theory, that's a fair test of an appealing campaign message - and the good news for democracy is that the presumed front-runners in both parties no longer look like prohibitive favorites so far in advance of Election Day. But the extraordinary dollar chase has so dominated the campaigns so far that candidates have little time for anything else.
NEWS
By Dan Morain and Carl Ingram and Dan Morain and Carl Ingram,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 13, 2003
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's $15 billion budget plan headed for the March ballot yesterday after an alliance with legislative Democrats allowed the governor to break a partisan deadlock and revive a proposal that had once appeared all but dead. Schwarzenegger claimed victory late in the afternoon when the California Senate gave final approval for placing the plan before voters, although most Republicans opposed the bond. "I am a happy governor because today is a new day for California," Schwarzenegger said as he signed the bills.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Breaking with a nearly 30-year tradition, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean announced yesterday that he would become the first Democratic presidential candidate ever to opt out of the system for publicly financing elections. Speaking to supporters in Vermont, Dean said that only by rejecting public financing - and the spending limits it imposes - could he compete financially with President Bush if he wins the Democratic nomination. Bush has rejected public financing and is aiming to raise at least $175 million by the Republican National Convention in September.
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