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NEWS
September 3, 1997
WITH THEIR APPROVAL RATING on the rise, members of Congress returned to Capitol Hill this week with hopes of avoiding controversies that might antagonize the public. This does not bode well for a number of important issues on the national agenda.The public's perception of Congress rose sharply after passage of the balanced-budget bill and the tax-cut package this summer. That, plus a continuing stream of good news on the economic front, has most Americans in a happy mood. Woe to the political party that dashes this happiness with a gridlocked Washington.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
A $1 trillion spending bill passed by Congress late Thursday — averting another shutdown by funding the government through October — directs tens of millions of dollars to the port of Baltimore and will keep airport control towers open across the state. The port funding, about $60 million, consists mostly of appropriations for dredging projects. The bill includes about $21 million for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat who helped steer the bill as chairwoman of the Appropriations Committee, called the legislation an "investment in the lives and livelihoods of those who depend on clean and open waterways" that will "keep businesses open and keep people working.
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NEWS
September 28, 2000
REPUBLICANS IN Congress still can't put their act together. The House as much as conceded the point Tuesday when it approved a stopgap measure to keep government agencies going through Oct. 6. A deadline of Oct. 1 -- the start of Washington's fiscal year -- had been looming. GOP leaders have even more trouble admitting that President Clinton's ability to get what he wants increases every day the budget impasse persists. That's a harsh pill for the GOP to swallow, particularly in a tight presidential campaign.
NEWS
August 7, 2011
I am a moderate and like to hear both sides of a story. I agree with Dan Rodricks that many people have made excessive money through legal but less than ethical means. I would favor an increased tax of 50 percent on those who make excessive salaries. That bracket would start at $2 million, not $200,000. But in Mr. Rodricks' recent column ("Question for tea party: What now?" Aug. 4), he once again only gives half the facts to support his liberal views. He considers the current members of Congress who want to stop the obscene spending and balance the budget to be extreme.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a campaign-style effort to regain their political footing after last week's impeachment vote, President Clinton and congressional Democrats challenged Republicans yesterday to enact broad education initiatives in the new budget."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton is giving the Republican-led Congress three more weeks to finish the spending bills that were due to be completed tomorrow, but that might not be such a favor.Republican leaders are so desperate to pass all 13 bills without dipping into the Social Security surplus that they are resorting to tactics considered impolitic just a week ago.For example, House Majority Leader Dick Armey said yesterday that House leaders have decided to save $8 billion by delaying tax refunds to the working poor -- opening the Republicans to accusations of callousness that they had sought to avoid.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Senate moved yesterday toward approval of a sweeping corporate tax overhaul - one of a series of measures with broad appeal to key constituencies that lawmakers are expected to pass before wrapping up their pre-election session this week. During an unusual Sunday session, the bill cleared a procedural hurdle when the Senate voted 66-14 to limit debate, paving the way for final passage today of the measure, which would provide almost $136 billion in tax breaks for businesses.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 15, 2004
WASHINGTON -- In the gap between President Bush's re-election and his second inauguration, the no man's land where defeated lawmakers hang onto their jobs and the newly elected wait in the wings, an odd but necessary ritual unfolds this week on Capitol Hill: the lame-duck Congress. The House and Senate return to Washington for a brief post-election session to wrap up unfinished business that they left behind last month, including a sweeping overhaul of the nation's intelligence community.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton vetoed another of the spending bills passed by Congress yesterday, but after speaking with the two top Republican leaders, he said he was ready to work around the clock to settle the standoff over the federal budget.There was little progress during the day as the two sides wrangled over a variety of issues having less to do with how much money the government will spend than with how it should be spent.Senior members of the House and Senate met yesterday evening with the White House budget director, Jack Lew, to try to reach an agreement on the spending bill for foreign aid, which has none of the money the president had sought for the Middle East peace process.
NEWS
December 15, 2006
The Democrats about to take over leadership of the House and Senate appropriations committees have already angered their colleagues and outraged lobbyists. Sen. Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia and Rep. David R. Obey of Wisconsin decided to strip upward of $10 billion in pork-barrel earmarks from the unfinished spending bills that Republicans are leaving behind and put a closed sign on the "favor factory" until the earmarking process is reformed. That means all the goodies so lovingly and painstakingly attached to the 10 remaining spending bills before time ran out last week won't be part of the fiscal 2007 federal budget - a no-frills measure intended to keep the government functioning until next fall while Congress devotes its main attention to shaping the spending bills for 2008.
NEWS
February 19, 2010
This week's anniversary of President Barack Obama's stimulus package has provided yet another episode of that never-ending TV series: "Extreme Partisanship, Washington Edition." Democrats have hailed the spending as the country's economic savior, and Republicans mock it for failing to stop job losses while adding $862 billion to the deficit. The truth is less exciting. What the stimulus has provided was a modest and temporary cushion against the economic downturn. Administration claims that the effort will have saved or created 3.5 million jobs in its two-year window are, as most economists have concluded, on target.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West , paul.west@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
Nearly $100 million in spending earmarked by Maryland lawmakers appears headed to more than 70 projects in the state under a huge year-end spending measure that the House is expected to approve today. The new money is on top of more than $800 million in additional spending for Maryland projects that was requested by President Barack Obama in his 2010 budget and placed in a $1.1 trillion package agreed upon by House and Senate negotiators late Tuesday. The measure includes $150 million for the Washington-area transit system, $138 million for consolidation of the Food and Drug Administration's offices at White Oak and more than $500 million for military construction projects in the state.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 16, 2008
Lawmakers in Annapolis are moving to tighten up campaign reporting requirements for the November referendum on legalizing slot machines, as both sides gird for what's expected to be a free-spending battle to win voters. The Senate heard two bills last week that would expand and clarify the mandates for groups and businesses to report their expenditures on either side of the slots debate. When legislators decided in last fall's special session to put the question of legalizing slots to a referendum, they also took a step to give voters more information about how much was being spent, and by whom, to influence the outcome.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | December 3, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A year away from opening a new education complex in Owings Mills, the Irvine Nature Center had been counting on the $335,000 in federal funding that Rep. John Sarbanes worked to secure for it in the 2008 budget. But with President Bush threatening to veto the spending bill that contains that earmark, the federal contribution to the $11.5 million building project is now in limbo. "It makes it extremely difficult," said Michele Speaks, director of institutional advancement for the private, nonprofit center.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- If the idea was to shame lawmakers into restraint, it did not work. Eight months after Democrats vowed to shine light on the dark art of "earmarking" money for pet projects, many lawmakers say the new visibility has only intensified the competition for projects by letting each member see exactly how many everyone else is receiving. So far this year, House lawmakers have put together spending bills that include almost 6,500 earmarks for almost $11 billion in local projects, half of which the Bush administration opposed.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have asked for a meeting with President Bush to see if they can work out an agreement on spending bills for the fiscal year that begins in 10 weeks. But lawmakers from both parties said they see no obvious way to overcome the stalemate with the White House. The House has passed eight of the 12 regular appropriations bills for 2008, and Bush threatened to veto five of them on the grounds that they called for "an irresponsible and excessive level of spending."
NEWS
December 6, 2006
Bill Frist's decision, after years of preening, to abandon a run for the White House was no doubt prompted by his failure to ignite any support among the electorate rather than by his dismal performance as Senate Majority leader. But his four years in that post, which end with the lame-duck congressional session this month, demonstrate how poorly equipped he is for any sort of leadership. The biggest stain on Mr. Frist's politically tone deaf tenure was his abdication of the fundamental responsibility to win approval of the spending bills that make up the federal budget.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Tom DeLay, the House Republican whip, acknowledged yesterday that the Republican-led Congress has effectively spent next year's projected $14 billion budget surplus and is still struggling to find enough money to pay for next year's government spending.In an interview, DeLay said Republican leaders recognized early this year that they lacked enough votes in their own party to approve spending cuts deep enough to meet the target set under the 1997 Balanced Budget Act.That target is $16 billion below the amount spent on federal programs this year.
NEWS
June 22, 2007
Shutting down the favor factory that has gotten so many lawmakers in trouble on Capital Hill is proving very difficult. Democrats were forced last week to drop an arrogant and unworkable proposal by House Appropriations Committee Chairman David R. Obey, who had taken it upon himself to review more than 31,000 spending requests for pet projects with no opportunity to challenge his choices. Now, the favored projects will be advertised by sponsor and attached to spending bills before they reach the House floor, so opponents may challenge them.
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