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Kevin Cowherd | September 1, 2012
The drivers don't like to talk about it. IndyCar isn't crazy about the subject, either. But there's no getting around the danger of open-wheel racing. You don't have to be a genius to figure out why. Take Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore. For openers, you'll have 25 cars racing at ridiculously high speeds around a tight 2.04-mile course in the heart of a city. Throw 25 super-competitive drivers into the mix. Now add road surface changes from concrete to asphalt, 300 manhole covers, blind turns and light-rail tracks and the potential for disaster is everywhere.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
There are more similarities between the Orioles and their American League Championship Series opponent, the Kansas City Royals, than not - they both have solid pitching, stellar bullpens and play exemplary defense - but the way they score runs is completely different. The Orioles led the major leagues with 211 home runs in the regular season, 25 more than the next-highest club, while the Royals were last with just 95. But when it comes to stolen bases, the teams rank the exact opposite, with the Royals leading the majors with 153 and the Orioles ranking last with 44. Over the course of the season, Orioles players have often said they never feel out of any game because they know they can change it with one swing of the bat. And one only needs to look at the AL wild-card game - in which Kansas City stole seven bases and erased a four-run, sixth-inning lead on their way to beating the Oakland Athletics - to see how they've made speed an X-factor.
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NEWS
July 9, 2014
As head of the Comcast region serving Baltimore City, I would like to address and correct inaccuracies about our local offerings in this paper's recent commentary entitled "Faster, cheaper, better broadband in Baltimore" (June 30). Comcast operates in a highly competitive marketplace, and our Baltimore City customers already receive our fastest high-speed Internet and advanced video, voice and smart home technologies. We deliver the same speeds in Baltimore City today as we do across other parts of Maryland, with the same competitive standalone Internet prices and special bundled packages and promotions.
BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The circle of political power brokers and deep-pocketed investors hatched their plan more than three years ago, seeing promise in a project deemed wildly unrealistic by some and stubbornly unattainable by others. With billions in backing from the Japanese government, the Northeast Maglev group envisions building a futuristic magnetic levitation or "maglev" train capable of transporting Baltimore homeowners to Washington jobs in 15 minutes, at speeds above 300 mph. Plenty in Maryland think it will never happen or shouldn't, given the price tag in excess of $10 billion.
NEWS
July 13, 2014
I am outraged at the assertions made by Tom Coughlin of Comcast in his letter to The Sun ( "Comcast provides competitive services in Baltimore," July 9). His claims that Comcast operates in a highly competitive market are laughable. Comcast is our only realistic option, and if any one dares to opt out of any of Comcast's services, he/she will see the price for the other services go up. Yes - drop one service in an effort to lower your bill and instead you end up paying more. It is a nasty game that is played out every single time a Comcast promotion ends or a new service is introduced.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Rookie Steve Johnson hadn't started a game in almost a month when he took the mound in the first game of Monday's doubleheader. He didn't really care about the gap in starts. He's a local kid pitching in Baltimore's first pennant race in 15 years - really, that's plenty for him right now. "This is what you look for, pitching in a playoff race," said Johnson, the St. Paul's graduate and son of former Oriole Dave Johnson. "Just wanting my team to win, pitch in a big game, try to get them out. … This is a lot of fun. " Johnson (4-0)
NEWS
By Ev Ehrlich | March 4, 2014
The proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner highlights the vast gap between the imagined world the broadband industry's critics and the real world in which these companies must compete. For years, the critics have advocated forcing companies such as Verizon and Comcast to share their infrastructure with their competitors or mandating that the broadband market only offer one level of service. Their argument is that America's broadband is gripped by a "cable/telco duopoly" that uses its market power to slow innovation and gouge the consumer.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | August 31, 2011
During the Irene aftermath, some non-functioning stoplights have kept the pace slower at some intersections. Yes, they've caused traffic backups, but slower speeds and drivers trying to be a little more aware have been a welcomed change of routine. The tree down in the middle of our street functioned as an inverted speed hump. Normally, drivers race down the first block of Ridgewood and take the curve as if they're driving in Monte Carlo. When they tried to do that this week, two maple limbs sent them screeching to a halt right before the bend.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Sun Reporter | May 21, 2000
If you listen to history, history whispers that 11 have prevailed - only 11. Fusaichi Pegasus will not join the all-star roster of Sir Barton, Gallant Fox, Omaha, War Admiral, Whirlaway, Count Fleet, Assault, Citation, Secretariat, Seattle Slew and Affirmed.Those 11 swept the three races that make up the Triple Crown . Fusaichi Pegasus, the "next great horse," failed yesterday in the second, the 125th Preakness before 98,304 damp and chilly fans at Pimlico Race Course . After winning the Kentucky Derby as if he might be the next Secretariat, Fusaichi Pegasus struggled to finish second in the Preakness as the heaviest favorite since Spectacular Bid in 1979.
NEWS
July 1, 1995
State officials are taking a huge gamble. They believe that motorists who have been driving nearly 65 miles an hour on rural interstate highways in Maryland in violation of the law will stick to that speed now that it is the legal limit. That hasn't been the experience in other states.Some of the statistics being used to justify Gov. Parris Glendening's insistence on raising the speed limit from 55 mph to 65 mph today on 265 miles of highway are suspect. A statement from the governor's office quotes his transportation secretary, David L. Winstead, as saying the number of fatalities in states with 65 mph limits has been stable since 1990.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
The air of seeming inevitability that had developed around the idea of a successful constitutional challenge to state bans on gay marriage was punctured Wednesday by a federal judge in Louisiana. After 21 consecutive decisions favoring marriage equality in federal district and appellate courts since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act, federal District Judge Martin L. C. Feldman upheld the ban on same-sex marriage that Louisiana voters overwhelmingly supported in 2004.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Within the last week the Orioles have added Jimmy Paredes, Alejandro De Aza, and Quintin Berry to their roster. The moves address a major deficiency of this club: A lack of speed. The Orioles are dead last in the major leagues -- by far -- in stolen bases. They have 36. The Miami Marlins and the Boston Red Sox are tied for the second-fewest with 49. Five individual players had more than the entire Orioles' team. The Los Angeles Dodgers' Dee Gordon leads the major leagues with 58 stolen bases, 22 more than the Orioles.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
City Councilman James B. Kraft says he's hired two investigators to help complete a City Council probe of Baltimore's troubled speed camera system.   Two paralegals - - who are paid $32 and $26 per hour, respectively - - from the Robert Half Legal staffing firm began work last week reviewing thousands of documents that the Rawlings-Blake administration turned over to Kraft's committee.   “The mayor has approved the money for two full-time investigators for up to three months,” Kraft said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Howard County police say their speed camera vendor has corrected a year's worth of inaccurate data the company submitted about the cameras there.  In a letter submitted to the County Council this week, Chief Gary Gardner reported that Xerox State & Local Solutions had resolved its data issues to the police department's satisfaction. "Xerox has resubmitted the report to the police department after manually checking the data points and it now includes all of the original, complete information," Gardner wrote.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
I agree with Christopher Winslow's letter decrying the attempt to reinstitute Baltimore City's speed cameras ( "Baltimore should not resurrect speed cameras," Aug. 26). They have never been about safety, only revenue. If nothing else, they offer perverse incentives to our esteemed politicians, who seem delighted to take money from citizens and visitors and send a good chunk of it to out-of-town vendors. I've not seen a shred of evidence that the cameras serve their intended purpose.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
I am very confused about the city's motivation to resurrect the speed camera system ( "Redflex lobbying Baltimore for speed camera contract," Aug. 21). For a very long time now, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has repeated the mantra that the speed cameras are not about the money, but for the safety of Baltimore citizens. But now we have Councilman Robert Curran saying, "Why don't we have them backup? What's going on? We're losing revenue. " And then there is Councilwoman Helen Holton's statement that "I look at the revenue that other jurisdictions are getting and ask, 'Why would we not?
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | June 24, 2001
First there were roller skates, then skateboards and inline skates. Last year, it was the scooter. And now, there are Heelys: your mother's newest nightmare. Essentially heavy-duty sneakers with a wheel right in the heel, Heelys (which have great potential to be banned by schools) do double duty as both shoes and skates -- meaning you can get a good running start before you let the wheels fly. Sprint, rest back on your heels, lift your toes and voila -- you're "heeling," which roughly translates to "zipping along at break-neck speeds."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore Immigration Court, facing an increase in the number of cases involving immigrant children who crossed the border illegally, is expediting reviews to more quickly decide whether the children should be deported, according to attorneys with clients before the court. The so-called "rocket docket," created in response to a directive last month from the Obama administration to fast-track the cases, has meant the children receive initial hearings within 21 days and in some cases are given a matter of weeks, instead of months, to find an attorney.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Andrew Baker Jr. and Angel Chiwengo were holding hands and listening to soft music on the radio as he drove her home from the Pikesville Doubletree Hilton where they worked. As they headed east on Northern Parkway and passed through the York Road intersection, a Honda Accord fleeing police blasted through a red light - at more than 100 mph - and smashed into his Jeep. Chiwengo, 46, and the two people inside the Accord died. Somehow, Baker, 54, survived. But with the anniversary of the Sept.
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