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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Speed cameras in Prince George's County will stop issuing warnings and begin sending out actual tickets starting Wednesday. County police said the end of the 30-day warning period for the county's new automated speed enforcement program means any driver going more than 12 mph over the speed limit in a school zone could receive a $40 ticket. The cameras will remain in operation between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday-Friday in designated school zones. Michael.dresser@baltsun.com
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Bob Johnston was giving his 21-month-old son, T.J., a bath in his home on Windsor Mill Road in Franklintown the night of Dec. 18 when he felt "a god-awful shaking" and looked outside. Three lawns away, a large van had crashed into a neighbor's home. In Johnston's front yard, a small tree decorated for Christmas was in disarray. "I saw all the balls that my wife put on the tree on the ground, and I thought, 'He went right through the yard,'" Johnston said. The van, registered to the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, had actually driven through three yards, gone airborne off a 6-foot embankment and clipped the home of Samuel Johnson, who said he heard "a loud boom along with a lot of screeching" before he jumped off his couch and ran toward the rear of his home.
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NEWS
December 16, 2011
Regarding Jay Hancock 's article "Welcome to Md., becoming known as the 'Speed Trap State'" (Dec. 13): It really grieves me that a Connecticut businessman was booked by a speed camera going 67 mph in a 55-mph zone and given a $40 fine. And that Mr. Hancock himself was snapped going 43 mph in a 30-mph school zone. What is this? Can no one read anymore? You exceed posted speed limits by 12 and 13 miles per hour and bellyache that you got a ticket? And that it's Maryland's fault because the state needs to fill its coffers with money from innocent drivers?
NEWS
By Nick Cafferky, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
As the traffic signal turned yellow, a silver Honda SUV heading north on South Caton Avenue sped up. It beat the red light, but not before a flash went off as a camera snapped a picture of its license plate. The driver would likely receive a $40 ticket in the mail, courtesy of the Baltimore City Department of Transportation - another victim of the most prolific speed camera in the city. The camera, which has resided at the intersection of Caton and Benson Avenue since November 2009 and was one of the city's first, is responsible for more than 85,000 tickets - thousands more than any other in the city.
EXPLORE
August 9, 2011
Special cameras are the answer, all school areas need them. I live close to Scotchtown Hills Elementary in Laurel, and the camera helped slow down the speeders there. There is also a four-way stop close by and I've seen trucks speed through without stopping as some auto drivers do. I doubt a smiley face or frown face would mean anything to those who don't care, but a $40 fine would get their attention. Luella Cain Laurel
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Will a state or city leader with a clear set of well-considered priorities please stand up? Jill Carter and Carl Stokes are at it again ("Speed cameras yield $19.2 million," Sept. 12). I can't keep up with all the issues they keep raising. Let me tell you, Mr. Stokes, that I wish there were more cameras around Baltimore City. Seton Hill has tried for years to get the city to slow the traffic on Druid Hill Avenue, but the city refuses to help, ironically citing the need for first responders to get through the area quickly.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Bob Johnston was giving his 21-month-old son, T.J., a bath in his home on Windsor Mill Road in Franklintown the night of Dec. 18 when he felt "a god-awful shaking" and looked outside. Three lawns away, a large van had crashed into a neighbor's home. In Johnston's front yard, a small tree decorated for Christmas was in disarray. "I saw all the balls that my wife put on the tree on the ground, and I thought, 'He went right through the yard,'" Johnston said. The van, registered to the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, had actually driven through three yards, gone airborne off a 6-foot embankment and clipped the home of Samuel Johnson, who said he heard "a loud boom along with a lot of screeching" before he jumped off his couch and ran toward the rear of his home.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
As the silver Chrysler passed under the first bridge, the trooper flipped a time clock switch. He flipped it again as the car passed under a second bridge a short distance down the road.Dividing distance by time, the computer displayed the average speed in large, red digital numbers: 70.1 mph.Another speeder nabbed by the State Police Stopping Team.The Stoppers were out in force yesterday, setting up traps throughout Maryland as the agency began a crackdown aimed at reversing a trend toward higher speeds on the state's highways.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
It is most amusing to see the controversy surrounding speed cameras and the revenue they generate ("Speeding drivers get the blame," Sept. 13). I wonder what we tell our children sitting in the back seat. When they say, "Daddy, why are you speeding?" do we explain that "Daddy doesn't have to obey the laws," or do we say "Because almost everybody else is doing it too?" We claim to be a democratic country, and as such we elect officials to administer highway construction and safety enforcement on the public streets.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
Speeders beware: County police want you.Over the next two months, officers in police cruisers and unmarked cars, on motorcycles and in helicopters will use radar, lasers, chronometers, and anything else they have to catch drivers with lead feet, especially in residential neighborhoods.The initiative, announced by Police Chief Larry W. Tolliver yesterday, is funded by a $5,000 grant from the state Department of Transportation that will pay for officers' overtime.Police and reserve officers will target neighborhood speeding because that is where police get the greatest number of complaints.
NEWS
September 15, 2012
It is most amusing to see the controversy surrounding speed cameras and the revenue they generate ("Speeding drivers get the blame," Sept. 13). I wonder what we tell our children sitting in the back seat. When they say, "Daddy, why are you speeding?" do we explain that "Daddy doesn't have to obey the laws," or do we say "Because almost everybody else is doing it too?" We claim to be a democratic country, and as such we elect officials to administer highway construction and safety enforcement on the public streets.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Will a state or city leader with a clear set of well-considered priorities please stand up? Jill Carter and Carl Stokes are at it again ("Speed cameras yield $19.2 million," Sept. 12). I can't keep up with all the issues they keep raising. Let me tell you, Mr. Stokes, that I wish there were more cameras around Baltimore City. Seton Hill has tried for years to get the city to slow the traffic on Druid Hill Avenue, but the city refuses to help, ironically citing the need for first responders to get through the area quickly.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended the city's nearly $20 million in revenue from its booming speed camera program Wednesday, placing the blame on motorists who refuse to slow down. "It's a minor inconvenience for people who routinely break the law," the mayor said of the $40 speeding tickets triggered by the city's 83 cameras. She spoke after the city's spending board received documents showing a multimillion-dollar increase from the cameras. The city got $19.2 million in revenue from the program over the past year - a nearly tenfold increase in the three years the cameras have been operating.
NEWS
December 16, 2011
Regarding Jay Hancock 's article "Welcome to Md., becoming known as the 'Speed Trap State'" (Dec. 13): It really grieves me that a Connecticut businessman was booked by a speed camera going 67 mph in a 55-mph zone and given a $40 fine. And that Mr. Hancock himself was snapped going 43 mph in a 30-mph school zone. What is this? Can no one read anymore? You exceed posted speed limits by 12 and 13 miles per hour and bellyache that you got a ticket? And that it's Maryland's fault because the state needs to fill its coffers with money from innocent drivers?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Speed cameras in Prince George's County will stop issuing warnings and begin sending out actual tickets starting Wednesday. County police said the end of the 30-day warning period for the county's new automated speed enforcement program means any driver going more than 12 mph over the speed limit in a school zone could receive a $40 ticket. The cameras will remain in operation between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday-Friday in designated school zones. Michael.dresser@baltsun.com
EXPLORE
August 9, 2011
Special cameras are the answer, all school areas need them. I live close to Scotchtown Hills Elementary in Laurel, and the camera helped slow down the speeders there. There is also a four-way stop close by and I've seen trucks speed through without stopping as some auto drivers do. I doubt a smiley face or frown face would mean anything to those who don't care, but a $40 fine would get their attention. Luella Cain Laurel
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2005
Drivers in Howard County should be on the lookout for another type of camera that police will begin using next month when students return to the classroom. These "speed cameras" will not trigger $75 tickets as the ones at red lights do, but they will snap crystal-clear photos of drivers blowing through school zones. Pictures will be mailed to speeders' homes along with a formal warning and brief lecture on pedestrian deaths. Call it safety through shame. No one is disputing the goal, but some state officials are unhappy about the method.
FEATURES
By Tom Incantalupo and Tom Incantalupo,Newsday | April 30, 1992
Chronic speeders will soon have a new weapon against The Law: a --board detector that purportedly can warn drivers if police are stalking them with their newest gadget, a laser gun.The leading manufacturer of laser guns, however, claims that a detector will be useless against its device.Cincinnati Microwave Inc. says that it will begin delivering its $99 laser detector in June.Laser guns are used against speeders by an estimated 50 police departments nationwide. (The laser guns are not being used by the Baltimore City Police Department or the Maryland State Police, according to spokesmen for those agencies.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2010
Cops don't seem to like getting caught on camera. Anthony John Graber III of Harford County is finding that out the hard way. His rapid and possibly reckless motorcycle trip up Interstate 95 has landed the systems engineer in more trouble than a speeding ticket. The 24-year-old Graber is facing criminal charges after the Internet posting of a video he recorded on his helmet-mounted camera during a March 5 traffic stop. When a state trooper saw the 23-second clip on YouTube 10 days after the stop, police got a warrant, searched Graber's parents' house in Abingdon, seized his equipment and charged him with violating the state's unusually restrictive wiretapping law. It's illegal in Maryland to capture audio without the other person's consent, and Trooper J.D. Uhler said he didn't know he was being recorded.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 7, 2010
This week, Watchdog brings you updates on several previously unresolved issues. Update: The Charles Street speed trap has been disarmed. Reader Tom Lavin had noticed a 40-mph speed limit sign on southbound Charles Street, just north of a 30-mph sign obscured by a branch. That sign was just north of a speed camera at Lake Avenue - a combination that seemed designed to generate speeding tickets. But now the 40-mph hour sign has been replaced with one that alerts motorists to a 30-mph speed limit ahead.
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