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By Peter Pae and Peter Pae,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2004
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - A 12-foot experimental plane equipped with a special jet engine streaked across the Pacific Ocean at more than seven times the speed of sound yesterday, shattering a technological barrier and brightening future prospects for super-fast airline flights. Flying faster than any aircraft ever built, NASA's X-43A "Hyper X" plane reached a top speed of about 5,000 mph, or about a mile and a half per second, before the unmanned craft was intentionally ditched into the ocean.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 31, 2008
Coldplay Three-time Grammy winner Coldplay released its fourth album, Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends, in June, and it quickly became the most downloaded album in history. The album features frontman Chris Martin (above, left, with Jonny Buckland) singing in a lower register than his trademark falsetto, and a harder edge to the sounds typical of the band's earlier hits, including "Yellow," "Clocks" and "Speed of Sound." Coldplay comes to the Verizon Center, 601 F St. N.W., Washington, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 31, 2008
Coldplay Three-time Grammy winner Coldplay released its fourth album, Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends, in June, and it quickly became the most downloaded album in history. The album features frontman Chris Martin (above, left, with Jonny Buckland) singing in a lower register than his trademark falsetto, and a harder edge to the sounds typical of the band's earlier hits, including "Yellow," "Clocks" and "Speed of Sound." Coldplay comes to the Verizon Center, 601 F St. N.W., Washington, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Peter Pae and Peter Pae,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2004
EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - A 12-foot experimental plane equipped with a special jet engine streaked across the Pacific Ocean at more than seven times the speed of sound yesterday, shattering a technological barrier and brightening future prospects for super-fast airline flights. Flying faster than any aircraft ever built, NASA's X-43A "Hyper X" plane reached a top speed of about 5,000 mph, or about a mile and a half per second, before the unmanned craft was intentionally ditched into the ocean.
FEATURES
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
Maryland author Tom Clancy has made a fortune with books that detail the latest in technology. Now it seems the low-tech world is trying to get his attention.He was on the tail end of a five-day cruise Friday aboard the Queen Elizabeth 2 when the ship ran aground and all passengers had to be evacuated.In June, he was traveling to Las Vegas with his family in a private rail car when the nation's railroads went on strike, stranding him in Salt Lake City. He rented a car to finish the trip."Bad luck?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 30, 1997
MARIETTA, Ga. -- Lockheed Martin Corp. has delayed the first flight of its F-22 fighter plane after finding a potential problem related to the fuel system.The flight had been scheduled for this weekend.The concern involves "the electrical connections to the fuel tank probes," the company said in a statement. "It is necessary to inspect all fuel probe connections as a safety precaution."Those inspections mean final ground tests that must be completed before the F-22 can fly won't be done until next week at the earliest.
NEWS
By New York Times | August 23, 1993
It is hard to track the blue whale, at up to 170 tons the ocean's largest creature, which has almost been killed off by commercial whaling and is now listed as an endangered species. Attaching radio beacons to the behemoth is difficult, and visual sightings are too sporadic to give real insight into its behavior.So biologists were delighted early this year when, with the help of the Navy, they were able to track a particular blue whale for 43 days, doing nothing more intrusive than monitoring its sounds.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 1997
"The Speed Of Sound: Hollywood And The Talkie Revolution, 1926-1930," by Scott Eyman. Simon & Schuster. 390 pages. $30.Scott Eyman, author of books about Mary Pickford and Ernst Lubitsch, has written a scintillating book about that chaotic moment when talkies edged out silent movies. An indispensable and long overdue piece of film history, "The Speed of Sound" is also a page-turner of a story.At the forefront of Eyman's book is a financial drama. Only two men were visionary - and megalomanical - enough to recognize the inevitability of sound: William Fox and Sam Warner.
NEWS
By Matthew Brelis and Matthew Brelis,THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 27, 2000
It was an engineering marvel and an economic millstone. It symbolized the zenith of luxury at a time when the pleasures of air travel are at a nadir. And, until Tuesday, the Concorde had an unblemished safety record. Able to fly across the Atlantic in 3 1/2 hours, cruising more than 10 miles above the Earth at twice the speed of sound, the Concorde, with its $10,000 round-trip tickets, is the conveyance of choice for the super-rich and super-powerful. While Air France and British Airways - the only two airlines to fly the supersonic airplane - can eke out a profit on the plane through shrewd marketing and chartering the jet for about $40,000 an hour, the plane's development cost was a staggering $21 billion in current dollars, all bankrolled by French and British taxpayers.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | October 15, 1994
It defied the recession, much as it had the speed of sound. But hard times finally have caught up with the aviation toy of the rich and the royal.British Airways said yesterday that it is suspending its thrice-weekly supersonic Concorde service between Washington and London, ending nearly two decades of flying twice the speed of sound between the capital cities.The sleek, droopy-nosed Concorde will continue, however, its twice-daily service from New York to London.At a time the world's airline industry has lost billions of dollars and grounded hundreds of planes, the Concorde has endured.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - It's crunch time in Steven Garrett's laboratory - or, as is more often the case around here, Vanilla Heath Bar Crunch time. This month, executives from Ben & Jerry's will arrive at Pennsylvania State University to see the result of an unusual collaboration between the Vermont ice cream maker and the 53-year-old acoustic scientist. The goal: to create a radical refrigerator that chills not with chemicals but with sound. Garrett is a leader in the little-known field of thermoacoustics, the use of high-intensity sound to heat and cool.
NEWS
By Matthew Brelis and Matthew Brelis,THE BOSTON GLOBE | July 27, 2000
It was an engineering marvel and an economic millstone. It symbolized the zenith of luxury at a time when the pleasures of air travel are at a nadir. And, until Tuesday, the Concorde had an unblemished safety record. Able to fly across the Atlantic in 3 1/2 hours, cruising more than 10 miles above the Earth at twice the speed of sound, the Concorde, with its $10,000 round-trip tickets, is the conveyance of choice for the super-rich and super-powerful. While Air France and British Airways - the only two airlines to fly the supersonic airplane - can eke out a profit on the plane through shrewd marketing and chartering the jet for about $40,000 an hour, the plane's development cost was a staggering $21 billion in current dollars, all bankrolled by French and British taxpayers.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 27, 1999
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- His red cap is the first thing you see.The next thing is his red wheels.Then swoosh, the young man disappears, 12 cars down, carrying a red tray with two bags and two drinks. Seconds later, swoosh, he's up the sidewalk and through the door again, empty tray in hand.At Sonic, the speed of the carhops isn't the only thing getting attention.The speed of this company's growth -- in 1998, sales rose 17 percent to $1.3 billion and the company added 170 restaurants -- is turning heads, too.The company built its brand image by abandoning commercials featuring Frankie Avalon and switching to ads that emphasize the Sonic name and experience.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 30, 1997
MARIETTA, Ga. -- Lockheed Martin Corp. has delayed the first flight of its F-22 fighter plane after finding a potential problem related to the fuel system.The flight had been scheduled for this weekend.The concern involves "the electrical connections to the fuel tank probes," the company said in a statement. "It is necessary to inspect all fuel probe connections as a safety precaution."Those inspections mean final ground tests that must be completed before the F-22 can fly won't be done until next week at the earliest.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 1997
"The Speed Of Sound: Hollywood And The Talkie Revolution, 1926-1930," by Scott Eyman. Simon & Schuster. 390 pages. $30.Scott Eyman, author of books about Mary Pickford and Ernst Lubitsch, has written a scintillating book about that chaotic moment when talkies edged out silent movies. An indispensable and long overdue piece of film history, "The Speed of Sound" is also a page-turner of a story.At the forefront of Eyman's book is a financial drama. Only two men were visionary - and megalomanical - enough to recognize the inevitability of sound: William Fox and Sam Warner.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | October 15, 1994
It defied the recession, much as it had the speed of sound. But hard times finally have caught up with the aviation toy of the rich and the royal.British Airways said yesterday that it is suspending its thrice-weekly supersonic Concorde service between Washington and London, ending nearly two decades of flying twice the speed of sound between the capital cities.The sleek, droopy-nosed Concorde will continue, however, its twice-daily service from New York to London.At a time the world's airline industry has lost billions of dollars and grounded hundreds of planes, the Concorde has endured.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - It's crunch time in Steven Garrett's laboratory - or, as is more often the case around here, Vanilla Heath Bar Crunch time. This month, executives from Ben & Jerry's will arrive at Pennsylvania State University to see the result of an unusual collaboration between the Vermont ice cream maker and the 53-year-old acoustic scientist. The goal: to create a radical refrigerator that chills not with chemicals but with sound. Garrett is a leader in the little-known field of thermoacoustics, the use of high-intensity sound to heat and cool.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 27, 1999
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -- His red cap is the first thing you see.The next thing is his red wheels.Then swoosh, the young man disappears, 12 cars down, carrying a red tray with two bags and two drinks. Seconds later, swoosh, he's up the sidewalk and through the door again, empty tray in hand.At Sonic, the speed of the carhops isn't the only thing getting attention.The speed of this company's growth -- in 1998, sales rose 17 percent to $1.3 billion and the company added 170 restaurants -- is turning heads, too.The company built its brand image by abandoning commercials featuring Frankie Avalon and switching to ads that emphasize the Sonic name and experience.
NEWS
By New York Times | August 23, 1993
It is hard to track the blue whale, at up to 170 tons the ocean's largest creature, which has almost been killed off by commercial whaling and is now listed as an endangered species. Attaching radio beacons to the behemoth is difficult, and visual sightings are too sporadic to give real insight into its behavior.So biologists were delighted early this year when, with the help of the Navy, they were able to track a particular blue whale for 43 days, doing nothing more intrusive than monitoring its sounds.
FEATURES
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
Maryland author Tom Clancy has made a fortune with books that detail the latest in technology. Now it seems the low-tech world is trying to get his attention.He was on the tail end of a five-day cruise Friday aboard the Queen Elizabeth 2 when the ship ran aground and all passengers had to be evacuated.In June, he was traveling to Las Vegas with his family in a private rail car when the nation's railroads went on strike, stranding him in Salt Lake City. He rented a car to finish the trip."Bad luck?
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