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Speed Limit

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NEWS
May 22, 1991
A vast majority of respondents to The Evening Sun's informal telephone survey favor raising the speed limit on many of Maryland's interstate highways to 65 mph.Of 1,396 callers to SUNDIAL, 84 percent (1,166 respondents) said the speed limit should be raised; 230 callers favored keeping it at 55."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
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NEWS
August 7, 2014
Congratulations to Howard County for trying to figure out sensible speed limits ( "Are Howard County's speed limits too low?" Aug. 5). While it's a shame that the company contracted to study the issue messed up, similar studies should be required throughout the Baltimore area. I'd also like to congratulate Maryland's law enforcement personnel. Many times a driver I know has driven 65 or 70 mph on Maryland 295, I-95, or Route 100, and he has never been bothered by police or state troopers.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
If you're driving Coastal Highway south of the Route 90 bridge, now is the time to slow down. Ocean City officials have lowered the speed limit on a stretch of highway from 58th Street to 32nd Street from 40 mph to 35 mph. The change, recommended by the town's pedestrian safety committee, went into effect Nov. 1. The section of Coastal Highway south of 32nd Street is already limited to 35 mph. The speed limit north of 58th Street will remain...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Are Howard County's speed limits too low or too high? That's one question some county officials hoped to answer when they reviewed a report of speed camera data from their vendor, Xerox State & Local Solutions. Traffic engineers have attempted for decades to set reasonable speed limits by analyzing traffic flow, setting the limit at the 85th percentile speed of vehicles on the road - meaning 15 percent of drivers travel faster than the limit. The thinking goes that drivers set a natural limit based on perceived risk.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
Lightly traveled and pothole-free, the newly opened Inter-County Connector is an invitation to speed, and that has become a sore spot with commuters. A review of the toll road's speed limit is under way and preliminary results and recommendations are expected in a month, said Doug Hutchinson, the Maryland Transportation Authority's chief engineer. The study will take into account the sharpness and bank of curves, sight distances and accident history on the road, formally known as Route 200. "There are a lot of facets that need to be checked out," Hutchinson said.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
How is traffic safety improved by telling people that traveling 12 mph above the posted speed limit is acceptable? I suggest Increasing most speed limits by 10 mph instead. That would stop the practice of slowing down otherwise safe traffic flows simply for the purpose of raising revenue. Drivers obeying speed limits that are set too low cause accidents when other people are forced to change lanes trying to get around them. Dan Griffin, Perry Hall
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | January 10, 2010
The problem: Tree branches conceal a speed limit sign in North Baltimore. The backstory: Tom Lavin knows the speed limit on Charles Street. He's lived in different North Baltimore neighborhoods along Charles Street for most of his life, and usually remained within a safe threshold of driving 30 mph on the road. "I knew the speed limit on Charles Street in the city was 30 miles per hour, but I couldn't tell you exactly where it started," he said. But about a month ago, he went running and saw city workers installing a 40-mph sign on the west side of Charles Street, just north of Gittings Avenue near the Baltimore County border.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
The Sun has failed to note in its investigation of Baltimore City speed cameras that there are obviously many places where motorists can drive safely at speeds more than 12 mph above the posted limit. I suggest that speed limits be raised by 10 mph, which would still leave a margin of error for tickets and would allow those few drivers who choose to obey the speed laws to stop holding up the rest of us. Dan Griffin, Perry Hall
NEWS
December 23, 1991
Everyone who has ever gotten behind the wheel in Maryland knows full well that the state's 55 mph speed limit isn't working. And Marina Sarris' story in Friday's Evening Sun, which describes I-97 between the Baltimore Beltway and U.S. 50 as "Maryland's autobahn," offers more evidence. Sarris reports that drivers routinely speed there, as they do on I-95 north of Baltimore and I-83 south of the Pennsylvania line.Officials should have seen this coming. The 55 mph limit was mandated by Congress in the oil-squeezed '70s, when drivers were routinely hitting 65 or 70 mph on the interstates, and gas conservation was a key national goal.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 14, 2003
HOW ALERT some of you are sometimes astounds me, especially when you notice something I probably wouldn't. Charlie Jennings has observed some illogic with speed limits around Howard County, and he e-mailed about it. "I am fascinated by the process that determines speed limits. It is not the level of the speed limit that bothers me. I will drive at the posted limit, despite the attitude of drivers queued up behind me - I suggest that they vent their frustrations on the people who put the signs up, not at me. My fascination lies with the logic that is sometimes applied to the process.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Maryland State Highway Administration plans to lower the speed limit and add median fencing and a new traffic light on U.S. 1 near the University of Maryland, College Park, after a startling number of pedestrian deaths on the road. Officials decided to expedite the safety measures - ideas that came from a months-long study of the area - to have them in place by the upcoming fall semester. Three pedestrians have been killed crossing U.S. 1 in the past six months. Beginning Aug. 1, U.S. 1's speed limit will be dropped to 25 mph from 30 mph between Guilford and Berwyn roads, the highway administration said.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
In regard proposals to increase the speed limit on some Maryland roads ("Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 3), I have driven a moving truck, with attached flatbed trailer, carrying my car, two cats, one dog, my son and a guinea pig, across country. Any Maryland legislator who thinks that making that trek at 70 mph would be a good idea is welcome to try. It was bad enough at 55 mph. R. Beitler, Owings Mills - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Why would The Sun wish to keep safety lower than could be the case with artificially-low posted limits on the safest types of roads, the interstates and equivalent freeways, when the number of fatalities on those roads averages one per year ( "Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 4)? The Sun must be in the financial pocket of the groups that make money from speed traps on safe roads where the posted limits are set far below the 85th percentile speeds of free-flowing traffic under good conditions.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
Here's a number that ought to be memorized by every elected official in the state of Maryland: 485. That's how many people died in traffic collisions in 2011 in this state (the most recent year for which such statistics are available from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). That's the equivalent of about 10 full motor coaches. Yet the number that's being discussed these days in the General Assembly is 70. That's how fast, in miles per hour, some believe motorists should be allowed to drive on certain state highways, and under the circumstances, it's more than a little surprising that raising the speed limit is even on the legislative agenda.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The House unanimously passed a bill Thursday that would allow the State Highway Administration or the Maryland Transportation Authority to raise the maximum speed on expressways and interstate highways to 70 mph. The legislation, which now goes to the Senate, would not require either agency to raise speed limits. The current maximum is 65 mph. The bill would apply to parts of the federal interstate highway system and limited-access highways such as the Intercounty Connector. David Buck, spokesman for the highway administration, said parts of such roads as Route 32 and Route 100 are also classified as expressways and would be eligible, but noted that the agency has set their speed limits below 65 mph. Any changes to current speed limits would be made only after traffic studies showed the roads could handle higher speeds safely, according to the agency.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
For months, speed cameras have quietly been clicking away in Annapolis, recording speeders and sending them $40 fines. Between the launch of the program in April 2013 and Wednesday, the cameras have generated 8,981 tickets that will net $242,487 for the city once they're all paid. That's a bit above the pace the city anticipated - officials expected to generate $200,000 in the first year of the speed camera program. Thus far, 5,511 tickets have been paid, resulting in $148,797 for the city.
NEWS
December 29, 2013
Let me start off by saying that I am not opposed to speed cameras by themselves. I am only opposed to speed cameras that do not accurately measure speed and/or do not provide sufficient information in their documentation to violators to prove that the speed limit was exceeded by the amount specified by law. Baltimore officials insist that the city's speed camera program is intended to protect the safety of schoolchildren and not to make money....
NEWS
December 18, 2013
Baltimore City taxpayers are now the proud owners of 155 speed cameras and 81 red light cameras, none of which are currently operable. For a mere $600,000 (on top of $2.2 million for the cameras themselves), Baltimore has ended its relationship with a vendor that was unable to assure reliable and accurate use of the city's extensive traffic enforcement camera network. Now some City Council members are suggesting that we wash our hands of speed cameras altogether, with one proposing that we fund new police traffic enforcement by putting the equipment on eBay.
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