Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpeed Cameras
IN THE NEWS

Speed Cameras

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 4, 2011
One million bucks for two speed cameras? They must be buying them from the same outfit that sold hammers and toilet seats to the Pentagon. A speed gun costs less the $100; a good camera, $500. Does it really cost 2,500 times as much to connect them together? George B. Wroe, Glyndon
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
City Councilman James B. Kraft says he's hired two investigators to help complete a City Council probe of Baltimore's troubled speed camera system.   Two paralegals - - who are paid $32 and $26 per hour, respectively - - from the Robert Half Legal staffing firm began work last week reviewing thousands of documents that the Rawlings-Blake administration turned over to Kraft's committee.   “The mayor has approved the money for two full-time investigators for up to three months,” Kraft said.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 16, 2011
Jay Hancock 's screed ("Welcome to Md., becoming known as the 'Speed Trap State,'" Dec. 13) about speed cameras on Maryland's highways reads as an apology for speeding (which endangers other drivers, workers, children, and animals such as deer) with the implication that it is good for business. The Connecticut businessman he defends, who claims to go no more than five miles over the limit in his home state, was clocked going 12 (significant because he would need approximately another 25-35 feet to stop)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Howard County police say their speed camera vendor has corrected a year's worth of inaccurate data the company submitted about the cameras there.  In a letter submitted to the County Council this week, Chief Gary Gardner reported that Xerox State & Local Solutions had resolved its data issues to the police department's satisfaction. "Xerox has resubmitted the report to the police department after manually checking the data points and it now includes all of the original, complete information," Gardner wrote.
NEWS
December 12, 2012
Only politicians would "correct" the problems with speed cameras by creating more bureaucracies and rules ("Penalty pitched for bad tickets," Dec. 11). Get rid of the bloody things. We didn't need them for our first 100 years on the road. We don't need them now. Thomas F. McDonough, Towson
NEWS
September 28, 2011
If officials in Baltimore County were concerned about safety, they would install speed humps instead of speed cameras ("Balto. Co. to shift speed cameras, add another," Sept. 22). A camera can't make a vehicle slow down while a speed hump can. Speed humps are low tech, low maintenance and low cost. It's a no brainer. Yet the county is willing to spend our tax money on expensive gadgets that can't enhance safety, and the reason why is obvious. It's risky business when we allow our elected officials to use law enforcement as a means of revenue generation.
NEWS
December 31, 2011
After having read your editorial supporting Maryland's red light and speed cameras, I am forced to wonder how you, as journalistic heirs to the great H. L. Mencken, have so completely lost touch with the basic realities of the contemporary world ("The purpose of speed cameras," Dec. 27). These devices have nothing whatever to do with any type of road safety. They were brought to us by a cadre of manipulative, lying, thieving politicians who were too cowardly to openly raise taxes yet desperate for revenue.
NEWS
December 25, 2013
Where I live, they have speed cameras, and many complain about them being just another revenue source, saying that they don't protect children - and they are correct ("City speed cameras targeted revenue, not safety," Dec. 20). Speed limits and existing laws do the protecting. The cameras are just another way to enforce existing laws. Those who complain are usually those breaking those laws. Edward Migol - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
December 31, 2011
I was delighted to read your recent editorial in support of Maryland's speed cameras ("The purpose of speed cameras," Dec. 27), especially as it followed a column by Jay Hancock in which he departed from the genius that normally distinguishes his commentary and entered the realm of the blathering "booboisie" of AM talk radio ("'Speed trap state' new Md. motto, thanks to cameras," Dec. 12). Mr. Hancock gave us the Connecticut businessman so outraged over a $40 speeding ticket for driving 67 mph in a 55 mph work zone that he threatened to stop doing business in Maryland.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
I agree with Christopher Winslow's letter decrying the attempt to reinstitute Baltimore City's speed cameras ( "Baltimore should not resurrect speed cameras," Aug. 26). They have never been about safety, only revenue. If nothing else, they offer perverse incentives to our esteemed politicians, who seem delighted to take money from citizens and visitors and send a good chunk of it to out-of-town vendors. I've not seen a shred of evidence that the cameras serve their intended purpose.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
I am very confused about the city's motivation to resurrect the speed camera system ( "Redflex lobbying Baltimore for speed camera contract," Aug. 21). For a very long time now, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has repeated the mantra that the speed cameras are not about the money, but for the safety of Baltimore citizens. But now we have Councilman Robert Curran saying, "Why don't we have them backup? What's going on? We're losing revenue. " And then there is Councilwoman Helen Holton's statement that "I look at the revenue that other jurisdictions are getting and ask, 'Why would we not?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Traffic camera giant Redflex has been lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration and City Council to take over Baltimore's once-lucrative speed and red-light camera network - stressing that it should not be judged by an unfolding scandal in Chicago in which a former executive is charged with bribery. The Arizona-based firm ran Chicago's red-light cameras for a decade, generating $500 million in revenue, but lost the work last year amid city and federal investigations. Officials in Baltimore said Thursday that the company, which was once a finalist to run this city's system, has used the recent talks to distance itself from the Chicago indictments.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The speed camera company blasted in Baltimore for issuing tickets to people who weren't speeding is now facing criticism in Howard County, where it submitted a year's worth of inaccurate data about the program there. Data submitted by Xerox State & Local Solutions for the county's four cameras repeatedly listed more vehicles speeding than there were cars on the road, according to documents reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The 2013 data sometimes reported that 200 percent, 400 percent or even 600 percent of the number of cars that passed by a camera were speeding.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Well, it seems that Vincent DeMarco and his Maryland Citizens Health Initiative Group are back at it again proposing yet another $1 per pack increase in Maryland's tobacco tax which is already highest in the region. In his latest letter to the editor, there's even a thinly-veiled threat to Attorney General Doug Gansler and the Republican candidates for governor that, if elected, they'd better not try to repeal any of the tobacco or alcohol taxes enacted during the O'Malley-Brown administration ( "Md.'s tobacco, alcohol tax increases are saving lives," May 28)
NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
A 19-year-old Glenelg man was arrested after Howard County police said he set a speed camera box on fire earlier this week and tried do it again Saturday. Connor Lynn Eash, of 13680 Bold Venture Drive, has been charged with first- and second-degree malicious burning, attempt to burn and multiple counts of destruction of property. A report of the fire about 4:45 a.m. Thursday sent to police to 14000 block of Burntwoods Road in Glenelg where they found the equipment aflame and extinguished the fire, police said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
You've likely heard about the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera program, which found error rates much higher than city officials had acknowledged. Turns out that's only part of the story. Engineering firm URS Corp. also delivered to City Hall a second audit report that found additional errors at even more cameras. And it, too, was kept secret for nearly a year. The second report came to light when the city's law department turned over roughly 100,000 pages of documents to a City Council committee investigating the cameras.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Thursday making Maryland one of a handful of states to extend anti-discrimination laws to protect transgender people. The transgender rights legislation, which prohibits discrimination in employment and housing, was one of scores of bills O'Malley signed during the last scheduled public signing ceremony of his eight years as governor. Other bills he approved will overhaul Maryland's speed camera law to add safeguards for drivers from malfunctioning systems and outlaw "revenge porn" — the posting of intimate pictures on the Internet as a way of getting back at a former spouse or lover.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.