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Speech Recognition

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BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 30, 1992
In a few years, when you curse at your computer, don't be surprised if it tries to obey your command.After decades of work, computer scientists are coming closer to realizing one of the discipline's most sought-after goals: creating computers that respond to natural human speech.There are already a few products that let computers "understand" the spoken word. Most of them understand only one or two people who have taken time to "train" the system to understand their style of speech. But more advanced systems, ones that can understand anyone speaking to them without specific training, appear on the verge of moving from laboratory to market.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 19, 2010
Frederick Jelinek, a pioneer in creating the technology that allows computers to interpret human speech and translate languages, died Tuesday of a heart attack in his faculty office at the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The electrical engineering professor and Roland Park resident was 77. In more than 40 years at IBM Research and Hopkins, Mr. Jelinek led the way in developing the statistical theory behind modern voice-recognition systems that do everything from starting up phone service to translating intelligence intercepts from Arabic to English.
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FEATURES
May 6, 1998
"Let's Go Read! An Island Adventure" (Edmark Corp., 1997, $44.95) is a computer program for ages 4 to 6, using a variety of learning activities to engage beginning readers in the foundation skills needed for reading. Susan Rapp, a reading specialist and director of Village Reading Center in Columbia, assesses it.Unique Features:* Colorful, sequenced, interactive books that can be read to the child, read aloud by the child or printed out to save and read later.* Speech recognition allows the child to read aloud and the computer listens or responds.
NEWS
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2007
Jim and Janet Baker's home in Newton, Mass., is full of dragons - dragon statues, dragon kites and dragon curtains. A 200-pound dragon sculpted by Jim's sister sits in his living room. It's a fitting symbol for a couple who spent 25 years conquering one of digital technology's great dragons - converting human speech to written text. Today, at 62, Jim Baker is on a new quest. He is coming to Baltimore to direct a center devoted to language technology at the Johns Hopkins University. It's an urgent assignment.
NEWS
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,SUN REPORTER | July 16, 2007
Jim and Janet Baker's home in Newton, Mass., is full of dragons - dragon statues, dragon kites and dragon curtains. A 200-pound dragon sculpted by Jim's sister sits in his living room. It's a fitting symbol for a couple who spent 25 years conquering one of digital technology's great dragons - converting human speech to written text. Today, at 62, Jim Baker is on a new quest. He is coming to Baltimore to direct a center devoted to language technology at the Johns Hopkins University. It's an urgent assignment.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
Computers are ready to listen; let's talkPerhaps poet W. B. Yeats was looking ahead to the '90s when he penned the line, "Speech after long silence; it is right . . .," for we're at the dawn of an era in which computers everywhere will be speaking, and listening, to us.The past few months have witnessed an explosion of products ranging from low-end game enhancements that will let you cry "Phasers!" to blast a Romulan to complex packages that hold the promise of a "Jetsons"-like typewriter that hammers away as you talk to it.Researchers at IBM Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 28, 1999
I tried my first speech recognition program back in 1984. It was in a cartridge that plugged into my Radio Shack Color Computer, and it had a 64-word vocabulary. Occasionally, it would even guess right when I said one of those 64 words. Mostly, it guessed wrong.The state of the art has moved a long way since then. If you have a reasonably fast computer with enough memory, Dragon Naturally Speaking, IBM's Via Voice and Lehnart & Hauspie's Voice Express will all do a decent job of taking dictation and turning it into something resembling usable text.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck | December 14, 1992
Clinton taps software to help sort resumesThe big chill is ending for loyal Democrats. After 12 years of waiting, they're eyeing the choice jobs in Washington and sending in resumes by the thousands.To handle the avalanche of paper -- an expected 125,000 resumes, for 3,000 to 4,000 jobs -- President-elect Bill Clinton's transition team turned to Resumix Inc. And the Santa Clara, Calif., company has offered a solution combining optical scanning and artificial-intelligence software.Transition team staffers scan in each of the 2,000 resumes that arrive each day; Resumix's patented software adds the information to a data base of applicants and skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 8, 1998
If you'd like an entirely new surfing experience, why not talk your way around the Web?I've been doing it for a couple of weeks now with a nifty program called CoversaWeb, which lets you control your Web browser by talking to your PC.It's an entirely different feeling, and distinctly relaxing. Instead of hunching over your screen and pawing at a mouse, you can lean back in your chair, sip a cup of coffee and literally tell your computer where to go.And for those who don't have full use of their hands or suffer from repetitive stress injury, ConversaWeb is an incredibly useful tool.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 19, 2010
Frederick Jelinek, a pioneer in creating the technology that allows computers to interpret human speech and translate languages, died Tuesday of a heart attack in his faculty office at the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus. The electrical engineering professor and Roland Park resident was 77. In more than 40 years at IBM Research and Hopkins, Mr. Jelinek led the way in developing the statistical theory behind modern voice-recognition systems that do everything from starting up phone service to translating intelligence intercepts from Arabic to English.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Harrington and Mark Harrington,Newsday | November 22, 1999
As voice-control companies work to hijack control of the computer away from the keyboard, one sizable barrier threatens to foil the plot: People still are not comfortable talking to technology.Speech-recognition and voice-control technology have come a long way in just the past year, but even the industry's most ardent proponents admit to the psychological hurdles.At the recent Speech'TEK 99 conference, much of the talk centered on why Americans remain uncomfortable talking to computers. The issue is critical in light of recently released sales figures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 20, 1999
We're a long way from when computers can perform translations among languages that capture every nuance. But Desktop Translator from Transparent Language performs excellently in conveying the gist of documents back and forth among Spanish (Mexican and Castilian), French, German, Italian, Portuguese and English (British and American).The $100 Windows 95/98 program is far more sophisticated than products that rely on word-replacement translations. It uses a set of algorithms called Transcend RT to parse grammar, analyze vocabulary and follow diction patterns to convey meanings of text.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 28, 1999
I tried my first speech recognition program back in 1984. It was in a cartridge that plugged into my Radio Shack Color Computer, and it had a 64-word vocabulary. Occasionally, it would even guess right when I said one of those 64 words. Mostly, it guessed wrong.The state of the art has moved a long way since then. If you have a reasonably fast computer with enough memory, Dragon Naturally Speaking, IBM's Via Voice and Lehnart & Hauspie's Voice Express will all do a decent job of taking dictation and turning it into something resembling usable text.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 8, 1998
If you'd like an entirely new surfing experience, why not talk your way around the Web?I've been doing it for a couple of weeks now with a nifty program called CoversaWeb, which lets you control your Web browser by talking to your PC.It's an entirely different feeling, and distinctly relaxing. Instead of hunching over your screen and pawing at a mouse, you can lean back in your chair, sip a cup of coffee and literally tell your computer where to go.And for those who don't have full use of their hands or suffer from repetitive stress injury, ConversaWeb is an incredibly useful tool.
FEATURES
May 6, 1998
"Let's Go Read! An Island Adventure" (Edmark Corp., 1997, $44.95) is a computer program for ages 4 to 6, using a variety of learning activities to engage beginning readers in the foundation skills needed for reading. Susan Rapp, a reading specialist and director of Village Reading Center in Columbia, assesses it.Unique Features:* Colorful, sequenced, interactive books that can be read to the child, read aloud by the child or printed out to save and read later.* Speech recognition allows the child to read aloud and the computer listens or responds.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | July 12, 1993
Computers are ready to listen; let's talkPerhaps poet W. B. Yeats was looking ahead to the '90s when he penned the line, "Speech after long silence; it is right . . .," for we're at the dawn of an era in which computers everywhere will be speaking, and listening, to us.The past few months have witnessed an explosion of products ranging from low-end game enhancements that will let you cry "Phasers!" to blast a Romulan to complex packages that hold the promise of a "Jetsons"-like typewriter that hammers away as you talk to it.Researchers at IBM Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Harrington and Mark Harrington,Newsday | November 22, 1999
As voice-control companies work to hijack control of the computer away from the keyboard, one sizable barrier threatens to foil the plot: People still are not comfortable talking to technology.Speech-recognition and voice-control technology have come a long way in just the past year, but even the industry's most ardent proponents admit to the psychological hurdles.At the recent Speech'TEK 99 conference, much of the talk centered on why Americans remain uncomfortable talking to computers. The issue is critical in light of recently released sales figures.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck | December 14, 1992
Clinton taps software to help sort resumesThe big chill is ending for loyal Democrats. After 12 years of waiting, they're eyeing the choice jobs in Washington and sending in resumes by the thousands.To handle the avalanche of paper -- an expected 125,000 resumes, for 3,000 to 4,000 jobs -- President-elect Bill Clinton's transition team turned to Resumix Inc. And the Santa Clara, Calif., company has offered a solution combining optical scanning and artificial-intelligence software.Transition team staffers scan in each of the 2,000 resumes that arrive each day; Resumix's patented software adds the information to a data base of applicants and skills.
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