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By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
William G. Fastie, a pre-eminent astrophysicist who helped start the Johns Hopkins University space program in the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Friday of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 83 and lived in Green Spring Valley. Mr. Fastie, called "the father of the Hopkins space program," is best known for designing a spectrometer - an instrument for measuring the spectrum of light - rugged enough to withstand a rocket launch. His invention, made public in 1952, later helped scientists gather information about other planets at the dawn of the Space Age. That invention, along with his other work, helped propel Hopkins into the field of space research, said Paul Feldman, chairman of the Hopkins Department of Physics and Astronomy.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Police investigating the grisly killing of a young Texas mother have gotten an assist from a laser technology first developed to assay the quality of the enriched uranium made for America's nuclear bombs. Called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, it produces precise, on-the-spot chemical analyses that promise to help forensic detectives quickly match materials linking suspects to crime scenes. Since 2003, the technique has been used to answer questions in environmental and medical sciences, in astronomy and archaeology.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 23, 1991
GREENBELT -- The first joint U.S.-Soviet space effort in 16 years has successfully begun monitoring depletion of the Earth's protective ozone layer, scientists from both countries said yesterday.A U.S.-built Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), launched aboard a Soviet satellite Aug. 15, is sending back "high-quality data," said an obviously pleased Dr. Vyacheslav Khattatov, deputy director of the Soviet Central Aerological Observatory.Researchers from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and from the observatory, located near Moscow, made the announcement at a news conference at Goddard Space Flight Center.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
His face set in stony concentration, Swiss engineer Karoly Molnar moved quickly between his monitors and the frosty, 13-foot creation that he was bringing to life in a basement at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. As Molnar carefully injected electric current and balanced it with hundreds of gallons of cooling liquid helium, one of the most powerful superconducting magnets ever built for medical research slowly powered up last week. This fall, David J. Weber expects the magnet - at the core of the school's new 800 megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
The early-morning quiet at the University of Maryland Baltimore County gave way yesterday to the roar of a giant twin-rotor helicopter, called in to move a weighty scientific instrument closer to its new home.A 9,600-pound superconducting electromagnet -- as big as an elevator car, and part of a $2 million nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer -- was lifted from a parking lot into a courtyard beside UMBC's Chemistry/Physics Building.Federal Aviation Administration safety officials required the evacuation of six buildings and a 100-foot corridor from the parking lot to the science building.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
Kenneth Tompkins Bainbridge, 91, a scientist who accurately measured atomic weights and directed the first atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, N.M., died Sunday in Lexington, Mass.While a postgraduate fellow at Bartol Laboratory in Swarthmore, Pa., he built a mass spectrometer to search for the then-undiscovered Element 87, called eka-cesium. The instrument was so accurate it could measure the weights of atoms and their nuclei, as well as distinguish the weight difference of various isotopes of an element.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
His face set in stony concentration, Swiss engineer Karoly Molnar moved quickly between his monitors and the frosty, 13-foot creation that he was bringing to life in a basement at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. As Molnar carefully injected electric current and balanced it with hundreds of gallons of cooling liquid helium, one of the most powerful superconducting magnets ever built for medical research slowly powered up last week. This fall, David J. Weber expects the magnet - at the core of the school's new 800 megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1996
Bill Fastie was just out of high school when he did his first physics experiment. He went around Baltimore with an instrument called a transmission diffraction grating -- a flat piece of glass with lines on it -- and aimed it at every neon sign he saw. From that he learned many had no neon gas in them. They were charged with argon or mercury gasses instead."But they were still called neon signs!"Even today, at 80 years old, his final retirement from Johns Hopkins University approaching at the end of this month, Fastie conveys the flavor of his reaction: the exhilaration of his discovery colliding with the indignation at having his expectations undermined.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
NEAR is alive. The plucky little Maryland-built spacecraft that has been orbiting the asteroid Eros for the past year was supposed to have expired Monday on a kamikaze photography mission to the asteroid's surface. But against the odds, it has survived its impact with the surface. And it has called home. "Not only did the spacecraft survive, it's remained intact. We are still in communication with it," Jay Bergstrahl, NASA's acting director for solar system exploration, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft is circling the asteroid Eros at an altitude of as little as 12 miles - its closest approach since arriving at the ancient space rock in February. "This is the payoff time," said NEAR project scientist Andrew Cheng of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab in Laurel. Thousands of photos sent back by NEAR have revealed the 21-mile-long asteroid to be a bleak and battered place, cratered by meteorites and strewn with jagged boulders the size of buildings.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
NEAR is alive. The plucky little Maryland-built spacecraft that has been orbiting the asteroid Eros for the past year was supposed to have expired Monday on a kamikaze photography mission to the asteroid's surface. But against the odds, it has survived its impact with the surface. And it has called home. "Not only did the spacecraft survive, it's remained intact. We are still in communication with it," Jay Bergstrahl, NASA's acting director for solar system exploration, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft is circling the asteroid Eros at an altitude of as little as 12 miles - its closest approach since arriving at the ancient space rock in February. "This is the payoff time," said NEAR project scientist Andrew Cheng of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab in Laurel. Thousands of photos sent back by NEAR have revealed the 21-mile-long asteroid to be a bleak and battered place, cratered by meteorites and strewn with jagged boulders the size of buildings.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
William G. Fastie, a pre-eminent astrophysicist who helped start the Johns Hopkins University space program in the late 1950s and early 1960s, died Friday of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 83 and lived in Green Spring Valley. Mr. Fastie, called "the father of the Hopkins space program," is best known for designing a spectrometer - an instrument for measuring the spectrum of light - rugged enough to withstand a rocket launch. His invention, made public in 1952, later helped scientists gather information about other planets at the dawn of the Space Age. That invention, along with his other work, helped propel Hopkins into the field of space research, said Paul Feldman, chairman of the Hopkins Department of Physics and Astronomy.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 6, 1997
The early-morning quiet at the University of Maryland Baltimore County gave way yesterday to the roar of a giant twin-rotor helicopter, called in to move a weighty scientific instrument closer to its new home.A 9,600-pound superconducting electromagnet -- as big as an elevator car, and part of a $2 million nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer -- was lifted from a parking lot into a courtyard beside UMBC's Chemistry/Physics Building.Federal Aviation Administration safety officials required the evacuation of six buildings and a 100-foot corridor from the parking lot to the science building.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1996
Bill Fastie was just out of high school when he did his first physics experiment. He went around Baltimore with an instrument called a transmission diffraction grating -- a flat piece of glass with lines on it -- and aimed it at every neon sign he saw. From that he learned many had no neon gas in them. They were charged with argon or mercury gasses instead."But they were still called neon signs!"Even today, at 80 years old, his final retirement from Johns Hopkins University approaching at the end of this month, Fastie conveys the flavor of his reaction: the exhilaration of his discovery colliding with the indignation at having his expectations undermined.
NEWS
July 19, 1996
Kenneth Tompkins Bainbridge, 91, a scientist who accurately measured atomic weights and directed the first atomic bomb test at Alamogordo, N.M., died Sunday in Lexington, Mass.While a postgraduate fellow at Bartol Laboratory in Swarthmore, Pa., he built a mass spectrometer to search for the then-undiscovered Element 87, called eka-cesium. The instrument was so accurate it could measure the weights of atoms and their nuclei, as well as distinguish the weight difference of various isotopes of an element.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2005
Police investigating the grisly killing of a young Texas mother have gotten an assist from a laser technology first developed to assay the quality of the enriched uranium made for America's nuclear bombs. Called laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, it produces precise, on-the-spot chemical analyses that promise to help forensic detectives quickly match materials linking suspects to crime scenes. Since 2003, the technique has been used to answer questions in environmental and medical sciences, in astronomy and archaeology.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
While causing fever, chills and possibly even death for its victims, the malaria parasite also leaves a telltale sign behind: waste. "It's the perfect bar code for us to identify it," said Andrew Feldman, a scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The iron-based waste compound is the key to Feldman and others' efforts to develop a portable machine to detect malaria. Malaria infects 300 million people a year and causes 1 million deaths, making it the third deadliest disease in the world after HIV and tuberculosis, according to the World Health Organization.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 23, 1991
GREENBELT -- The first joint U.S.-Soviet space effort in 16 years has successfully begun monitoring depletion of the Earth's protective ozone layer, scientists from both countries said yesterday.A U.S.-built Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), launched aboard a Soviet satellite Aug. 15, is sending back "high-quality data," said an obviously pleased Dr. Vyacheslav Khattatov, deputy director of the Soviet Central Aerological Observatory.Researchers from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and from the observatory, located near Moscow, made the announcement at a news conference at Goddard Space Flight Center.
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