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NEWS
By Lindsay Kalter and Lindsay Kalter,lindsay.kalter@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
The annual Marlborough Hunt Races at Roedown Farm in Davidsonville celebrated its 35th anniversary last Sunday and in the process offered up a musical dichotomy of sorts. Near the starting line rail at one end of the oval racetrack, three local bands played between races and produced a musical mixture of guitars, bongos and pop-rock vocals for spectators and nearby tailgaters. And, where more of the racing could be seen, the audience heard a different soundtrack - the rhythmic galloping of horses and the occasional crescendo of resounding cheers.
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SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | February 5, 2009
The Maryland Jockey Club is expected to announce changes today to the infield spectator experience at this year's Preakness at Pimlico Race Course. Although Jockey Club officials declined to be specific about those plans yesterday, an invitation to today's announcement implied some changes by advertising, "Preakness Infield Fest, a new way to party." Pictured on the invitation was a cartoon horse in jockey silks strumming a guitar while astride what appears to be a volleyball. The volleyball is emblazoned with the date of this year's Preakness, May 16. The Preakness infield has typically featured all-day partying by tens of thousands of mostly young fans.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
The fact that a Texas Western team with an all-black starting lineup was facing an all-white Kentucky team for the national championship is not what first caught Gary Williams' attention as he sat at Cole Field House on a March afternoon in 1966. "The thing I remember most," Williams said this week, "was the idea that Texas Western came in ... and was the more sound, more fundamental team. They just out-executed Kentucky. Kentucky was a very good team, small but disciplined, and [Texas Western was]
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 10, 2008
About this time of the year a set of news stories appear to reveal how the spectator side of thoroughbred racing is about to perish. I read the accounts about Pimlico's fallen glory days and that the stands are empty, except for Preakness day. When it comes to racing, I am not unprejudiced. I grew up learning about the track and was smitten by the beauty of the horses and the social tone and demeanor of the colorful spectators.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | April 19, 2008
Tiger Woods would have been impressed. St. John's College senior Tristan Evans-Wilent raised a croquet mallet and smacked a softball-sized sphere 20 feet across patchy, uneven grass and through a wiry wicket. It doesn't take much to figure out that the Ithaca, N.Y., resident has a knack for croquet, a centuries-old, genteel game played mainly in backyards as a recreational activity but also competitively among clubs and colleges throughout the country. Evans-Wilent is a member of the popular St.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | February 21, 2008
Authorities in Prince George's County say they are optimistic that they can curtail the kind of dead-of-night drag races that set the stage for the deaths last weekend of eight spectators on a dark rural road. "We're going to look at this both as a law enforcement and an engineering standpoint," Sharon Taylor, a spokeswoman for the Prince George's County Police Department, said yesterday. "There are some opportunities for using technology here."
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | February 19, 2008
Yesterday morning, the driver in the lane to the right of me decided to turn left - and did. All I saw was a flash of turquoise as it cut first in front of me and then in front of the car in the lane to the left. But, hey, that's OK - what's a little heart-jolting fright among your fellow drivers, when you have this very important need to make that left turn, right this minute. On Sunday afternoon, I was driving up I-95 and, this time, the flash was a beige one. Impatient with the seemingly brisk, 70-plus mph flow of traffic, Beige on Wheels weaved across the lanes, nosing into the smallest of openings that would propel him toward his destination, oh, maybe three minutes faster.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Melissa Harris and Rona Marech and Melissa Harris,Sun reporters | February 18, 2008
ACCOKEEK -- They come to the street races for the thrill, to win money on bets, to prove something. But yesterday, racing fans, along with residents, mourners and curious onlookers, came to a flat stretch of highway here for a very different reason: to leave flowers, to pick up car pieces, to grieve and to ask if something could have been done to stop a drag race that killed eight people early Saturday morning. Some wondered aloud whether the tragic accident will bring an end to the chronic, dangerous scene or if the races will just crop up in a new location.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
ACCOKEEK -- An audience lined a flat and straight stretch of rural highway in the middle of the night to watch what many here say is a recurring show of speed and thunderous noise. The drivers spun their wheels, throwing smoke and warming the tires for the contest to come. At some point, the spectators stepped into the road. And, police later said, a Ford Crown Victoria not involved in the illegal street race drove into the blinding haze, straight into the crowd. Eight people were killed and at least five injured in the accident, which occurred about 3 a.m. yesterday near an unlighted intersection on Route 210 - also known as Indian Head Highway - in southern Prince George's County.
NEWS
October 28, 2007
Business owners were evenly divided about whether the inaugural Annapolis Triathlon had a positive effect on the city, a new survey has found. Requested by the city council's Economic Matters Committee, the survey was one of two conducted about the triathlon. The second, by the triathlon's organizers, polled participants in the Sept. 9 competition. "We felt it was important to have a third party look at the big picture of these type of events," said Mike Miron, Annapolis' director of economic development.
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