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October 14, 2010
Rob Zombie — death metal heavy, horror movie director — is a tease. When asked about his Sunday show with Alice Cooper at Merriweather Post Pavilion , he brags: "Expect, without a doubt, the greatest spectacle you'll ever see. " But asked for specifics, he gave away few details. "We'll do every possible gag, gimmick imaginable. Giant robots and everything," he said. "But I don't like to give it all away. " All right, Zombie, have it your way. He doesn't need to promote the show much.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellie Kahn and For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Strolling within a mile radius of Verizon Center Wednesday night must have made for an unusual sight: Thousands of young girls walked in the same direction - donning royal blue, synthetic wigs - and hoisting posters that read “Roar” and “It's my birthday” and “KatyCats.” Wednesday night marked pop queen Katy Perry's second night in D.C. for her Prismatic World Tour (she played here Tuesday, and kicked off the tour in North Carolina over...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ellie Kahn and For The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Strolling within a mile radius of Verizon Center Wednesday night must have made for an unusual sight: Thousands of young girls walked in the same direction - donning royal blue, synthetic wigs - and hoisting posters that read “Roar” and “It's my birthday” and “KatyCats.” Wednesday night marked pop queen Katy Perry's second night in D.C. for her Prismatic World Tour (she played here Tuesday, and kicked off the tour in North Carolina over...
NEWS
By Brenda Pridgen | February 25, 2013
On Feb. 15, the Baltimore City Democratic State Central Committee-45th District convened at the Oliver Community Center to select a candidate to assume the seat once held by Del. Hattie Harrison, a longtime political stalwart in East Baltimore who died last month. Ten candidates interviewed for the position, three of whom were also members of the committee conducting the interviews, before Nina Harper, director of the Oliver Community Association, was chosen for the position. At no time did the chair or committee members appear to think it was inappropriate for them to participate as final arbiters of the decision as to who should succeed Delegate Harrison.
NEWS
By Stacey Patton | July 8, 1997
FLINT GREGORY HUNT is finally dead. For weeks we waited for his execution, getting to know him through his desperate efforts to save his own life.What happens now? Hunt's family will bury him. Officer Vince Adolfo's widow, 12 years later, says she will get on, finally, with her life. Protesters will drop their signs and return to their normal lives.There are no more appeals. The final rejections have been issued. The waiting is over.As Hunt ate his last meal and said his final goodbyes, what went through his mind?
NEWS
December 2, 2000
THE FORMER Soviet Union used to celebrate its armed forces with a massive parade of troops in Red Square every November. We do it differently in this country -- in a far less threatening manner -- by parading the best and brightest of our future military leaders from West Point and Annapolis on the day of the Army-Navy football game. It's Baltimore's turn to play host to this event, after a 56-year lapse. The city is trying to make the most of it, too. Baltimore is an ideal setting for this sporting rivalry between the nation's oldest service academies.
SPORTS
February 2, 2006
Will the Super Bowl help improve Detroit's image? Will one aspirin cure cancer? L. Ruhe Columbia I hope so. Like Baltimore, Detroit gets a bum rap. It's a blue-collar, ethnically diverse town of hospitable folks who love sports. Sound familiar? Chuck Piel Ellicott City Improve Detroit's image? What's to improve? There's poverty, violence, crime, corruption, urban decay and massive layoffs caused by long-term corporate stupidity and greed. Overlay this with a bunch of rich people watching millionaires play music and perform an ultra-violent sport spectacle.
NEWS
March 10, 1992
Iowa's Sen. Tom Harkin and Nebraska's Sen. Bob Kerrey, both of whom have now dropped out of the presidential race, had a lot in common. Both are from sparsely populated Midwestern farm states. Both have relatively liberal voting records. And both voted themselves a hefty pay raise in the now infamous sneak late night roll call last summer. That spectacle -- which so emphasized their "Washington-ness" -- probably hurt them more than their liberal voting records.But make no mistake about it, their liberalism hurt.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 27, 1994
A T-shirt on campus compares The Citadel cadets to the spotted owls. It calls them both ''Endangered Species.'' A button worn in the visitors' gallery of the courtroom makes its own point. It reads: ''Save the Males.''The Citadel -- along with the Virginia Military Institute -- is literally the last bastion of the all-male public military colleges. It's a bastion under siege by a young woman named Shannon Faulkner, who wants to join the cadet corps and thinks she has the Constitution on her side.
NEWS
April 9, 2006
1791: French soldiers in Annapolis Rather than the British, the French came to Annapolis in April 1781, encamped with soldiers who fought alongside and aided American troops in winning the Revolutionary War. A granite monument honoring unknown French soldiers was dedicated on the edge of the St. John's College's playing fields and creek by President William Howard Taft in April 1911. The French army troops were under the command of Marquis de Lafayette, 24, who cut quite a social swath, even with the Tories.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 15, 2012
How many billionaires does it take to buy a presidential election? We're about to find out. The 2012 campaign is likely to be a battle between one group of millionaires and billionaires supporting President Barack Obama and another group supporting his GOP rival. Perhaps this was the inevitable result of the Supreme Court's grotesque decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission in 2010, which opened the floodgates to unrestricted campaign money through so-called "super PACs.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
Nick Nicaise's first word was "car. " While his childhood pals mooned over Mickey Mantle, he idolized driver Dan Gurney. And when his wife glimpsed a grown-up Nicaise beaming as he flitted around the garage area at an IndyCar race, she told him, "You're acting like a 12-year-old girl at a Beatles concert. " Nicaise, a computer reseller from Catonsville by day, is one of the thousands of car nuts for whom the arrival of the Baltimore Grand Prix is an unexpected gift. These guys and gals might not be as visible as Ravens fans, but they record races on their DVRs every weekend, drive their own cars at tracks around the Mid-Atlantic and travel to see the pros burn rubber in Indianapolis, Toronto and California.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati and Gus G. Sentementes and Baltimore Sun reporters | January 1, 2011
From morning to midnight, thousands of revelers gathered at the Inner Harbor on Friday to welcome 2011. "It's festive, everybody's happy," said Sophia Finch, who was at the harbor for the annual New Year's Eve Spectacular with her husband, Burton, and their grandson, 8-month-old Isaiah. "Everybody's doing the same thing: celebrating. " The couple, who live in West Baltimore, have come to the Inner Harbor celebration for the past seven or eight years, said Finch, a cosmetologist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
The sound of holiday standards seeping into the night, candy-cane sentries at the gate and strings of twinkling lights entice visitors down a certain wooded drive, helping them find what they couldn't possibly miss — the exuberant work of a man who doesn't just embrace Christmas, he throws his arms around it in the warmest of bear hugs. While other folks go antiquing, collect stamps, hunt, run or bake, Chuck Greason does Christmas. He Christmas-izes or Christmas-ates — or whatever it is that one does when a holiday becomes not just a hobby but a reason to get up in the morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2010
Rob Zombie — death metal heavy, horror movie director — is a tease. When asked about his Sunday show with Alice Cooper at Merriweather Post Pavilion , he brags: "Expect, without a doubt, the greatest spectacle you'll ever see. " But asked for specifics, he gave away few details. "We'll do every possible gag, gimmick imaginable. Giant robots and everything," he said. "But I don't like to give it all away. " All right, Zombie, have it your way. He doesn't need to promote the show much.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
Pratt Street has a rich history in Baltimore lore. It's old enough that the street has been identified on city maps dating back as far as 1801. But in August of 2011, it will experience something it hasn't seen in its previous 200 years: Cars driving 185 mph. That's the speed that IZOD IndyCar Series officials estimate competitors will be able to reach on the Pratt Street straightaway in the Baltimore Grand Prix, which will make its debut...
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 13, 1996
Barring the remote possibility that record numbers of Americans are lining up to see "Independence Day" under the impression that at last one of Richard Ford's novels has made it to the screen, what does explain the extraordinary success of the film?I mean, it's a hoot, but one would be hard put to argue that it's really that much better than anything else out there.But then excellence has never been a prerequisite for movie success.Still, one must begin by conceding the following: that in a very real way, "Independence Day" does what no other big summer film manages.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | November 1, 1994
THE REAL miracle of television is C-Span. I lie abed at a roadside inn in Grantville, Pa., and C-Span takes me back to youth. Or whatever that fizzy condition was back there in the mists of faraway 1962.It is the spectacle of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy debating one Mitt Romney in Boston that does the trick, but there would be nospectacle here by the Pennsylvania high road if it were not for C-Span.Mightier television powers, treating this spectacle as a parochial Massachusetts exercise, decline to interrupt their nightly flow of electronic slush by showing it.Only C-Span spreads it out across the darkening continent.
NEWS
By Tania Ganguli, TRIBUNE NEWSPAPERS | May 30, 2010
CONCORD, N.C. — Tony Stewart drank so much water that weekend he forgot to eat. So, 50 laps into the 300-lap Coca-Cola 600, his second race of the day, Stewart was hungry. By the end of the nearly 1,100 miles Stewart ran in May 1999 at two tracks in two states, racing two totally different types of cars, he was so exhausted and undernourished he couldn't even drive himself home. His girlfriend drove with a sick Stewart collapsed in the car. "When you're done with the 600 after running Indy, and the flight and helicopter rides and police escorts and all that during the day, you're very, very content to lay your head on a pillow," Stewart said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | April 7, 2010
"Hubble 3D," a celebration of the orbiting space telescope and the NASA crew that gave it new life last year, provides a glimpse of how star systems looked a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. It reveals the borders of the visible universe. It drinks in the spectacle of celestial bodies born in fiery pillars of clouds. The content is scientific. The imagery gets biblical. In fact, after Baltimore-based astronaut John Grunsfeld witnessed a positive power check on a Hubble camera he'd installed, he said, "Let there be light."
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