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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 25, 2006
When Robert Creamer looks at a wilted iris blossom, he thinks not of decline but of the melancholy beauty that can be found in the process of aging. When he examines the firework pattern of a dried peony or the skeletal remains of a tree frog, he is not saddened but inspired by the loveliness of a once-living thing and the magical transformations wrought by the passage of time. Now the Baltimore artist's stunning, large-scale color photographs of flowers, plants and zoological specimens in various stages of transition are the subject of a revelatory exhibition that goes on view tomorrow at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
Elaine Dodd, member of the Joppatowne Garden Club, looks through her garden for specimens to enter in the Joppatowne Garden Club and the Joppa library's Small-Standard Flower Show, "Joppa Past and Present. " The show will be held at the Joppa library, 655 Towne Center Drive, Joppatowne on Saturday, June 1 from noon to 4 p.m. There will be exhibits of plants members and others have grown in their yards and floral designs created to carry out the show's theme. For more information call Ellie Pfoutz, 410-679-4813.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
Prospectors and poachers are scouring the arid badlands of the western United States in a race with scientists to find an increasingly precious natural resource: dinosaur fossils.Public fascination with these Mesozoic beasts has triggered a competition among scientific institutions for prize specimens and created a private market in dinosaur remains, especially in Europe and Japan.Researchers worry that some of the remains being scavenged by entrepreneurs may forever be lost to science."Someone who plasters [a dinosaur fossil]
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
You know they're out there, but you seldom come across them. The ones torturing scientific data to prove that the earth is only about six thousand years old. The ones laboring to eliminate critical thinking from the public school curriculum. The ones who have documentary proof that Barack Obama was not born in the United States. Here in Wordville, we understand that the peeververein is numerous, but the fauna we come across tend to be minor cranks holding on to some half-remembered or half-understood schoolroom precepts.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Ronn Wade wants his mummy back. It's a quest that started in October, when Michigan authorities confiscated the mummified cadaver of a child illegally placed for sale on eBay. The incident briefly made headlines around the world. And Wade, director of the anatomical services division at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is convinced the body is part of an obscure but historic set of medical mummies known as the Burns collection.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | October 4, 1993
"Plastics."-- Bombshell career advice from "The Graduate."Today's weird science lesson is on plastination.Step this way -- into the basement (where else) of the Bressler Research Building on the campus of the University of Maryland at Baltimore. The place smells like biology class on frog-dissection day.The rooms inside the State Anatomy Board keep freeze-dried cadavers and donated organs -- as well as cremated, name-tagged remains that are shelved until the Anatomy Board's annual, communal burial.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
dship Garden Club is sponsoring a Standard Flower Show at Liriodendron May 15 and May 16; hours May 15 are 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.; hours May 16are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The show features yard specimens, container-grown plants and more. Information: 734-6154.
NEWS
By Jack Dolan and Dave Altimari and Jack Dolan and Dave Altimari,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2002
Lab specimens of anthrax spores, Ebola virus and other deadly pathogens disappeared from the Army's biological warfare research facility at Fort Detrick in the early 1990s, during a turbulent period of labor complaints and recriminations among rival scientists there, documents from an internal Army inquiry show. The 1992 inquiry at the Frederick facility also found evidence that someone was secretly entering a laboratory late at night to conduct unauthorized research, apparently involving anthrax.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 24, 2013
Elaine Dodd, member of the Joppatowne Garden Club, looks through her garden for specimens to enter in the Joppatowne Garden Club and the Joppa library's Small-Standard Flower Show, "Joppa Past and Present. " The show will be held at the Joppa library, 655 Towne Center Drive, Joppatowne on Saturday, June 1 from noon to 4 p.m. There will be exhibits of plants members and others have grown in their yards and floral designs created to carry out the show's theme. For more information call Ellie Pfoutz, 410-679-4813.
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November 18, 2011
On behalf of the parents of seventh-graders at St. Mark School, I want to thank science teacher Sandy Ward for securing a grant enabling our students to experience an incredible day of learning on the Chesapeake Bay. Our students participated in an on-the-water exercise in order to apply their in-class learning in a real world context. The St. Mark staff, along with guides at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Philip Merrill Center in Annapolis, provided a full day of invaluable activities for our children.
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November 18, 2011
On behalf of the parents of seventh-graders at St. Mark School, I want to thank science teacher Sandy Ward for securing a grant enabling our students to experience an incredible day of learning on the Chesapeake Bay. Our students participated in an on-the-water exercise in order to apply their in-class learning in a real world context. The St. Mark staff, along with guides at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Philip Merrill Center in Annapolis, provided a full day of invaluable activities for our children.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2009
The Natural History Society of Maryland houses a wall of cloudy-eyed snakes, drawers full of fossils, rocks, and skeletal remains of behemoths, shelves displaying Native American artifacts and glass-enclosed cases with mounted birds. More than 50,000 specimens, some preserved for more than a century, pay testament to the state's rich natural heritage and the society's tenacity at saving them. "We are about natural history here," said Ginger Mihalik, executive director of the society founded 80 years ago in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | August 19, 2008
In an extraordinary briefing yesterday, the FBI described in detail how a small army of scientists managed to trace samples of anthrax from the 2001 letter attacks to the bureau's chief suspect, microbiologist Bruce E. Ivins, at the Army's biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick. A panel of six microbiological experts joined top officials from the FBI's laboratory in the briefing - apparently an attempt to address concerns expressed by some scientists and others about the strength of the evidence linking Ivins to the high-profile case.
NEWS
By Eric Hand and Eric Hand,McClatchy-Tribune | January 26, 2007
The world's largest flower, a voluptuous beauty as red as lipstick and as big as a child, makes its physical home in the steamy jungle floors of southeast Asia. Now, analysis of the flower's DNA has placed it in a strange taxonomical home - in a family of plants with tiny flowers. Rafflesia, as it's called, is a freak of nature. But it seems the flower is also a freak of evolution. How did such big flowers, some a yard wide, evolve from flowers less than an inch across? "It's a mind blower," said Daniel Nickrent, a Southern Illinois University at Carbondale plant biologist and one of the authors of the study, which was published in the journal Science.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | December 8, 2006
Ronn Wade wants his mummy back. It's a quest that started in October, when Michigan authorities confiscated the mummified cadaver of a child illegally placed for sale on eBay. The incident briefly made headlines around the world. And Wade, director of the anatomical services division at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, is convinced the body is part of an obscure but historic set of medical mummies known as the Burns collection.
NEWS
By Nancy Wride and Nancy Wride,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2006
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- Dr. Lance Adams preps for surgery, snapping on latex gloves under a clear blue sky. Nearby, a medical team wearing hooded wetsuits administers underwater anesthesia. Members of the team hoist the doped patient out of the pool and muscle her onto a makeshift operating table. Adams, gripping sterile scissors, confers with various specialists on respiration rates and oxygen levels. "How's her gilling?" he calls out to his dozen colleagues clad in black rubber. He's about to mend a wound with the aid of boat glue, rubber bands and Popsicle sticks.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Fred Schulte and Alec MacGillis and Fred Schulte,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
A Maryland medical research institute that collects brains for studies of mental illness says it did nothing wrong in paying a Maine official $150,000 to harvest dozens of specimens, an arrangement that has prompted a federal investigation and a lawsuit alleging lack of family consent. "The institute firmly believes that it's always acted ethically and in good faith in all instances," Byrne Decker, a lawyer who represents the Stanley Medical Research Institute in Bethesda, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Diane Haithman and Diane Haithman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Laker, or Clipper? Hard to tell with this basketball player. Not only is he not wearing a team jersey - he is not wearing skin. This nameless, skinless "athlete" has just arrived in Los Angeles from Germany, to be part of the U.S. premiere of Body Worlds: The Anatomical Exhibition of Real Human Bodies, opening Friday at the California Science Center. On display will be more than 200 human specimens, about 25 of them whole bodies, each preserved through a "plastination" technique.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 25, 2006
When Robert Creamer looks at a wilted iris blossom, he thinks not of decline but of the melancholy beauty that can be found in the process of aging. When he examines the firework pattern of a dried peony or the skeletal remains of a tree frog, he is not saddened but inspired by the loveliness of a once-living thing and the magical transformations wrought by the passage of time. Now the Baltimore artist's stunning, large-scale color photographs of flowers, plants and zoological specimens in various stages of transition are the subject of a revelatory exhibition that goes on view tomorrow at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | September 20, 2006
As recently as a 100 years ago, it has been said, a squirrel could travel from Maine to Georgia without touching the ground, by hopping from one American chestnut tree to another. But a blight that was first discovered at the Bronx Zoo in 1904 has killed more than 4 billion of the trees and left most of the others too sickly to grow past a few feet tall. So when Columbia residents Larry and Gwen Peters spotted an American chestnut tree growing along Harper's Farm Road, it was a big day for the Maryland chapter of the American Chestnut Foundation.
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