Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpecies
IN THE NEWS

Species

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The eggs of a destructive foreign moth species that "poses a significant threat to our nation's forests and urban landscapes" were found aboard a carrier ship docked in Baltimore in mid-September, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said Monday. Customs agents discovered six masses of Asian Gypsy Moth eggs during a Sept. 16 inspection of the Columbia Highway, a vehicle carrier that had made port calls in Japan in June and July, the border agency said. Females of the species can travel 25 miles per day and "can lay egg masses that could yield hundreds of hungry caterpillars," the agency said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2014
Baltimore is happily celebrating our Birds, who last week clinched their first American League division title in 17 years. The O's certainly earned cheers for the joy they've brought us all season. But other kinds of birds are in trouble. A report earlier this month indicated that almost half of North America's bird species risk extinction before the end of this century. Meanwhile, a National Audubon study of over 500 species found that most face major habitat loss as climate disturbances shrink and shift the places where they can live.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tom Siegfried | July 29, 1997
YOU CAN'T FOOL Mother Nature, the saying goes. But you can fool around with her.And humans have been fooling around with nature for centuries, particularly since the dawn of the Industrial Age. Humans pollute the air, mow down forests, cover the land with the concrete of roads, replace the natural skyline with skyscrapers, scoop fish out of the oceans, and dump fertilizer and pesticides all over the place.The problem with all this, many scientists say, is that humans aren't the earth's sole inhabitants.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A shipment of aluminum sheets from China had to be fumigated at the port of Baltimore this week after a snail species never seen locally before was spotted on the outside of a shipping container, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The Acusta sp. snail species could have posed "a significant agriculture threat because they cause damage by feeding on agricultural and horticultural crops as well as native plants, thereby lowering crop yields and crop quality," CBP officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 2004
SAN DIEGO - The only captive member of what might be the world's most endangered species of bird has died in Hawaii, according to zoo officials. The death of the male po'ouli at a Maui conservation center came less than three months after its capture. Only two other po'ouli are known to exist, both in Maui's dense rain forest. Bird specialists had hoped to capture one or both of the other birds to assist in a captive breeding program. That effort has been unsuccessful. Alan Lieberman, the San Diego Zoo's avian conservation coordinator, said the chances for survival of the species were "infinitesimally small" after the bird's sudden death Friday.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | November 15, 1990
The silver spot butterfly was a common sight over the meadows of Baltimore and Cecil counties a decade ago. During the last two years, only five have been spotted in all of Maryland.The butterfly is just one of a staggering 281 species that the state is planning to add to its listing of endangered and threatened species.The state's proposal, which is up for public comment until Monday, would nearly double to 618 the number of plant and animal species whose continued existence in Maryland is considered questionable, said Gene Cooley, a data base botanist with the state Department of Natural Resources' 10-year-old Natural Heritage Program.
NEWS
By ROBERT LEE HOTZ and ROBERT LEE HOTZ,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2006
In one of Asia's most isolated jungles, the Foja Mountains of western New Guinea, naturalists have discovered a vast unexplored preserve of exotic species new to science. Among the previously unknown species researchers found during a 15-day expedition in December were more than 20 species of frogs, five palms and four butterflies. They also found hundreds of rare birds and giant rhododendrons with white blossoms the size of bread plates, believed to be the largest on record. All told, the 3,700 square miles of mist-shrouded tropical forest might be the most pristine natural area in Asia and the Pacific, Conservation International announced in Indonesia today.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 22, 2006
After the 18,000-year-old bones of diminutive people were found on the Indonesian island of Flores, the discoverers announced two years ago that these were remains of a previously unknown species of the ancestral human family. They gave it the name Homo floresiensis. Doubts were raised almost immediately. But only now have opposing scientists from Indonesia, Australia and the United States weighed in with a comprehensive analysis based on their first-hand examination of the bones and a single mostly complete skull.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2005
As wildflowers go, Torrey's mountain-mint isn't that striking. The short-stalked plant sports white blooms in late summer, but otherwise would be hard to pick out in a leafy lineup. "You have to really be on a search to find it," says botanist Cris Fleming of Chevy Chase, who recalls spying some several years ago in a rocky outcrop on a Baltimore County farm. Even when they're looking for it, though, scientists have a tough time finding Pycnanthemum torrei these days. It's rare - recorded in fewer than 20 places in the world - and likely to get rarer still, as homes, shopping centers, roads and parking lots gobble up more land in Baltimore's sprawling suburbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 7, 1995
Sometimes subtext is much more interesting than text. Take the case of "Species," for example.On the surface, it's another routine bug-hunt movie, with a team of crack experts heading down into the sewers to do battle with a slimy green monster with mandibles of steel. "Them!" did it better 41 years ago and "Alien" did it authoritatively 14 years ago.But underneath the stale sci-fi/horror conventions, the movie is saying something quite interesting and it's too bad Hugh Grant didn't see it in time to spare himself such embarrassment.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Since Charles Darwin wrote "The Origin of Species" more than 150 years ago, it's been known that nature's selection creates some species and ends others. But researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County suggest that another actor is responsible for driving wedges in animal populations to create new species - mothers themselves. A study published last month in the journal Ecology Letters suggests that female creatures' sexual preferences may launch an evolutionary process that can lead to the creation of new species.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Fishing with my nephew made me wonder - would bait worms be good to add to my garden? No! We think of earthworms as good, but some species can be very destructive. The latest non-native worm to establish itself in several states is the crazy snakeworm. Fortunately, it's not in Maryland - we don't want that nightmare here. The crazy snakeworm voraciously consumes the upper organic soil layer or mulch and turns it into grainy, dry worm-casting piles. Forest understory life is destroyed and other earthworm species disappear.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A caterpillar species never before seen in the Baltimore area and considered a potential threat to local agriculture production was intercepted at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol said Friday. The discovery of the Chrysauginae caterpillar was confirmed July 24 after a review of the caterpillar by an entomologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The caterpillar was first discovered in soursop leaves being carried by a passenger who had arrived at BWI on a flight from Jamaica on Nov. 14, customs officials said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
For as long as anyone can remember, wild orchids have rewarded sharp-eyed hikers in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains with pink, yellow and white blooms peeping from the forest floor. But these "secret beauties," as one researcher dubbed them, are vanishing at an alarming rate, likely devoured by a horde of deer feeding on every leaf and shoot they can reach, according to a new study. "Deer are like lawnmowers when they get going in a forest," said J. Mel Poole, the superintendent of Catoctin Mountain Park in Thurmont.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
An agriculturally destructive moth species never before seen in the United States was found in a shipment of Chinese soybeans at the port of Baltimore, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said Friday. The insect species, Nemapogon gersimovi, could "pose a significant agriculture threat because they are known to feed on seeds and grains, reducing a farmer's yield," the agency said. The 50,000-pound shipment of bulk organic soybeans, intended as animal feed, was not allowed into the country and was exported.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
The blue-green algae that bloomed in tidal rivers throughout the upper Chesapeake Bay last month was toxic, an independent laboratory has confirmed, but so far has not harmed wildlife or caused human health problems, state officials said yesterday. Some strains of the algae, identified as Microcystis aeruginosa, can cause skin problems and flu-like symptoms in humans and can sicken or kill livestock or pets that drink it. Tests performed at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, confirmed the presence of the algae's toxin, said Rob Magnien, director of tidewater ecosystems assessments for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
May 3, 1998
A LIST OF popular seafood compiled in the latest issue of Audubon magazine contains a surprise for the Chesapeake region. The two edible varieties in least danger of overfishing and decline, according to the nature magazine's report, are rockfish and crabs. Bluefish, another local staple, is close behind them.Since Maryland clamped down on catching rock and crab in the past decade, those species might still be considered under threat. Indeed, enforcement of catch limits on both species continues.
SPORTS
By Nate Rabner and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Joey Jobes' workshop is a small, two-story building in Havre de Grace, minutes from the Susquehanna Flats at the top of the Chesapeake Bay. The space is dominated by saws, knives, paints and hundreds of blocks in various stages of transforming into ducks, geese and other birds. Most horizontal surfaces are covered in tools and supplies, but Jobes seems to know where everything is. "My life is business," Jobes said. A second-generation decoy carver in the self-proclaimed decoy capital of the world, he has been in his business for most of his 48 years and goes about it with practiced ease.
SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
Discarded bottles, empty bags of chips and errant playground balls littered the shoreline of the Fort McHenry Wetland, a 7.5-acre hub of biodiversity home to hundreds of plant and animal species. "Anything that floats ends up downstream," said Laura Bankey, director of conservation for the National Aquarium, the wetland's steward since 1999. "Because this is a soft shoreline with vegetation, it ends up here. " To combat pollution plaguing the marsh habitat, about 250 volunteers picked up trash, dredged debris, planted trees and tended the wetland's gardens Saturday as part of a cleanup event hosted by the aquarium and the National Parks Conservation Association.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.