Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpecial Treatment
IN THE NEWS

Special Treatment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 7, 2014
The article, "Firefighter recruits at issue at BWI Airport" (March 5), brought to light the issue of a recent all-white firefighter recruitment class at the Baltimore-Washington International-Thurgood Marshall Airport. A comment was made that "The complaints are the latest in a series of claims from black firefighters that they don't get equal consideration in recruitment at fire departments throughout the region. " If the nine white recruits were the most experienced and qualified for the job, as the article implies, then the people making the comment don't want equal considerations in recruitment for minority recruits, they want quotas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 7, 2014
The article, "Firefighter recruits at issue at BWI Airport" (March 5), brought to light the issue of a recent all-white firefighter recruitment class at the Baltimore-Washington International-Thurgood Marshall Airport. A comment was made that "The complaints are the latest in a series of claims from black firefighters that they don't get equal consideration in recruitment at fire departments throughout the region. " If the nine white recruits were the most experienced and qualified for the job, as the article implies, then the people making the comment don't want equal considerations in recruitment for minority recruits, they want quotas.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 19, 2010
Maryland's new three-foot rule is intended to make motorists aware that they are sharing the road with bicyclists. Tragically, it took the death of bicyclist Larry Bensky to persuade the legislature, after five years, to finally pass this safety legislation. Since the folks in northern Baltimore County have opposed safety improvements like road widening and eliminating blind spots to retain the rural, scenic character of their roads, everyone who uses these roads needs to be extra careful.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
With negotiations on ending the government shutdown and debt limit impasse appearing to make progress in the Senate, there is now some reason to hope that the potential cataclysm brought on by the House tea party caucus' anti-Obamacare fever will be avoided. The Senate compromise, while far from perfect, would at least give the nation some breathing room so that Republican and Democratic leaders can (again) seek some broader agreement on spending, taxes and the deficit. But there is still, of course, the chance for House Republicans to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
When a Baltimore judge sentenced Moshe Khaver to five years in prison for nearly killing a boy over a marijuana debt, she said the son of a Park Heights rabbi was no different from violent drug dealers from Cherry Hill. Yet the 19-year-old is being treated differently. Khaver has served the first 10 months of his prison sentence not in a state facility but in the city's Central Booking and Intake Center, an often crowded facility that typically houses detainees after they are arrested.
NEWS
October 16, 1997
NEIGHBORS ANGRY at Rite Aid Corp. Chairman Martin Grass for landing his helicopter near his home in the Green Spring Valley seem to have the law on their side. Baltimore County zoning regulations do not allow helicopter landings and takeoffs in agricultural areas.However, neighbors are feeling a false sense of victimization. They say Mr. Grass is receiving special treatment because he's rich (an amusing contention, since they are wealthy, too).Yet Mr. Grass has been inspected, cited and fined just like any other citizen who breaches the law. Complaining neighbors have been told to prepare to testify in court.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Bernard L. Schwartz, a major Democratic campaign donor, said yesterday that he never sought special treatment from President Clinton for his satellite company now under investigation for possible unlawful assistance to China."
NEWS
By Louis Miserendino | December 8, 2010
John Paterakis is one of the richest guys in Baltimore. His bakery supplies supermarkets and fast food joints from New England to North Carolina, and he owns a good deal of the waterfront east of the Inner Harbor. Oh, and just last year, he pled guilty to violating campaign finance laws and paid a $25,000 fine. So does he deserve a $155 million tax break for an $800 million development in Southeast Baltimore, called Harbor Point? Councilman Carl Stokes is not so sure, and he's using the occasion to raise questions about the city's entire redevelopment strategy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - The episode has been retold so many times in the past 3 1/2 years that it has become the stuff of political legend: In the frenzied days after Sept. 11, 2001, when many flights were still grounded, dozens of well-connected Saudis, including relatives of Osama bin Laden, managed to leave the United States on specially chartered flights. Now, newly released government records reveal previously undisclosed flights from Las Vegas and elsewhere, and point to a more active role by the FBI in aiding some of the Saudis in their departure.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
I read the letter regarding the State Highway Administration sign shop with interest until I noticed a lack of interest on the writer's part about the financial soundness of the state making its own signs ("Private sector should make Md. road signs," Aug. 24). After learning of writer Roger A. Campos' minority business interests, his true intentions became clear. It is a shame that he sees a government operation as a source of income without regard for improving the operation. No where in the letter did he demonstrate how minority or small-business involvement would benefit anyone other than the businesses he represents.
NEWS
August 26, 2013
I read the letter regarding the State Highway Administration sign shop with interest until I noticed a lack of interest on the writer's part about the financial soundness of the state making its own signs ("Private sector should make Md. road signs," Aug. 24). After learning of writer Roger A. Campos' minority business interests, his true intentions became clear. It is a shame that he sees a government operation as a source of income without regard for improving the operation. No where in the letter did he demonstrate how minority or small-business involvement would benefit anyone other than the businesses he represents.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Anne Arundel County officials on Monday issued a statement denying what they said were "allegations" that former county executive John R. Leopold was receiving special treatment in the county jail, where he is incarcerated for misconduct in office. County Executive Laura Neuman said in a press release that Leopold, 70, who was been jailed since Thursday, was not afforded treatment and accommodations beyond what other inmates can have. "John Leopold has been treated in the same custodial manner as his fellow inmates and has not received preferential treatment," she said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Autistic children of federal workers in 22 states begin receiving insurance coverage this month for a key behavioral treatment, under a decision by the Office of Personnel Management. Maryland, home to the third-largest population of federal workers in the nation, is not one of them. "These families desperately need the best coverage for their kids," said Stuart Spielman, senior policy adviser and counsel for Autism Speaks. He said the advocacy group would petition the OPM to expand its coverage as quickly as possible.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Hooray for Del. Heather Mizeur for staring down oil companies over fracking in Maryland ("No studies? No fracking," Sept. 13). Delegate Mizeur is demanding solid, scientific studies of all the risks of fracking before allowing it here. The oil industry maintains that fracking is safe. But if fracking is safe, why did the oil industry seek, and get, special treatment in the 2005 Energy Bill to keep the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from regulating fracking? This "Halliburton Loophole" is named after former Vice President and Halliburton oil chief Dick Cheney.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
The former chief of the Baltimore State's Attorney's office's gun unit was arrested over the weekend and charged with a handgun violation, records show.  Matthew Fraling, 49, who spent 23 years as a city prosecutor and oversaw prosecutions of gun offenders for his final two years, was pulled over on Friday night at about 11:45 p.m. in the 2500 block of Guilford Ave. after an officer in an unmarked vehicle began following him. The officer, Det....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
There's a delicious surprise in the new issue of Sun Magazine. You have to know what you're looking for, though. There's so much to read and see in the 175th anniversary celebration issue of the Sun Magazine, great pieces by Sun staffers, past and present, and charming essays by Marylanders whose lives have been affected by the Baltimore Sun. But the surprise I'm talking about accompanies an essay by retired dining critic Elizabeth Large...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
There's a delicious surprise in the new issue of Sun Magazine. You have to know what you're looking for, though. There's so much to read and see in the 175th anniversary celebration issue of the Sun Magazine, great pieces by Sun staffers, past and present, and charming essays by Marylanders whose lives have been affected by the Baltimore Sun. But the surprise I'm talking about accompanies an essay by retired dining critic Elizabeth Large...
BUSINESS
April 4, 2004
The company that makes it frightfully easy to find information on the Internet is now ready to help you find great deals, too. Froogle, the long-awaited shopping site from search leader Google, made its official debut last week, although it has been available - for those who knew where to look - for some time. Its Web address is www.froogle.google.com. Froogle - pronounced, of course, like "frugal" - offers links to millions of products from thousands of online merchants. Results can be sorted by category and price.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
At Maryland, Austin Walker lived the dream of walk-on football players everywhere. The 6-foot, 195-pound safety from Langley High in Northern Virginia joined the Terps in 2007 and redshirted as a freshman. Over the course of the next two seasons, Walker appeared in 22 games, mostly as a special teams performer. Then before his redshirt junior season began, Walker was awarded a scholarship, which he kept for his fifth year as well.   “It was a breakthrough,” Walker said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 4, 2011
Haruki Nakamura is one of three Ravens players who hail from Ohio. But that doesn't mean that the free safety, who is a Cleveland native, gets any special treatment when he and the rest of the team visit Cleveland Browns Stadium - as they do Sunday. “When I got drafted [in the sixth round in 2008], I was getting all sorts of crap from my friends from Cleveland,” Nakamura said with a smile. “I can't win in Baltimore as far as my family goes. My mom tells me that she'll cheer for me, but she won't cheer for the Ravens because she's a Browns fan. So that's what I deal with when I go home.” Wide receiver Lee Evans, a native of Sandusky, and defensive tackle Brandon McKinney, a native of Dayton, are the other Ravens players who grew up in Ohio.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.